Buckeye Wind pauses to enjoy spring?

Please read the next blog posting…The Ohio Power Siting Board approved amendments to the Buckeye I project as expected.  But as Logan County’s Tom Stacy says; ““From my perspective it’s not what you get, it’s what you gave away.”    The PILOT is about 20% to 25% of what would be paid without the PILOT.  As we have said before, if you are going to sell your county, don’t leave money on the table.  And for goodness sake, don’t take it from the residents who will have to live with the project. 

As UNU’s attorney says in the story, “Concerns about safety and noise for neighboring homeowners should also be considered first, regardless of potential revenue for the county, said Jack Van Kley, an attorney for UNU who has argued against the project. “No amount of money is going to compensate people for the loss of comfort in their own homes,” Van Kley said.  Yesterday’s fire in Benton County, Indiana brings that message home in a  truly frightening way. In Ohio, our setbacks are so small, this fireball could have been just a little over 1000 feet from a home or school. Reports from Indiana noted the relief from citizens that their fire did not happen during the dry season- and it was one MILE away from town!…

So, why could Buckeye Wind be “pausing”? Read the next blog please…

Developers of the Buckeye Wind Project are trying to determine if construction could begin this year after members of the Ohio Power Siting Board approved changes to portions of the first phase of the project….

However, now that those changes have been approved, Dagger said company officials are reviewing possible timelines for the project. Construction could start this year, although no decisions have been made.

I think we’re trying to weigh that as we work into spring here,” Dagger said.

If construction does begin this year, it would likely not be until fall. The company could also wait to see what happens with the project’s second phase before beginning construction….

Earlier this month, county officials in Van Wert and Paulding Counties received the first PILOT payment from Iberdrola Renewables as part of the separate Blue Creek Wind Project in northern Ohio. In that case, Van Wert County Auditor Nancy Dixon said her county received about $2,070,000, which was split between schools and other taxing entities, including about $230,000 for that county’s general fund.

“From my perspective it’s not what you get, it’s what you gave away,” Stacy said.

However, without the PILOT, proponents of the wind farm have repeatedly said it could make the project too expensive to move forward.

Concerns about safety and noise for neighboring homeowners should also be considered first, regardless of potential revenue for the county, said Jack Van Kley, an attorney for UNU who has argued against the project.

“No amount of money is going to compensate people for the loss of comfort in their own homes,” Van Kley said.

via Champaign turbine project could start | www.springfieldnewssun.com.

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