What does an electric Co-op (and engineer) think of BigWind?

We have shared the opinion of some Ohio co-op’s opinions in the past with you. Here is another from a state with tremendous BigWind presence and it is authorized by a professional engineer.  Additionally, many of the links on our website show you countries and states battling rising electricity rates, that are attributable to BigWind. Note, below, that the mission of an electric co-op is long-term, low-cost reliable electric service. Isn’t that what all of us ‘should’ desire for our homes, businesses, hospitals and manufacturing? Please share with skeptical friends….

THE ROLE OF WIND ENERGY IN AGRICULTURE A COOPERATIVE’S POINT OF VIEW…

UNDERSTANDING ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES

  • We are not-for-profit entities
  • Electric rates are based on cost of service, not on a return on investment
  • Member consumers are the cooperative’s owners
  • Consumers elect a governing board of directors from their members
  • The mission is long-term low-cost reliable service...
  1. WIND ENERGY IS NEGATIVE LOAD TO A UTILITY
    • Intermittent capability to generate energy
    • Does not provide Capacity or base load energy
    • Compares favorably with intermediate and peaking variable costs
    • Increases system volatility and costs…
  1. PROPOSED NET METERING
    • Net metering is a concept where a customer can use the utility system as a “bank” or “battery” to store and withdraw energy (at no cost to the customer)
    • Often described as a system where the meter can run backwards when customer generates more energy than needed
    • The problem is that the product taken out costs the utility much more than the benefit of the product put in
    • Net metering is not currently available in Kansas but is currently being discussed
    • Coops opposition to net metering is an issue of fairness

o Why should the utility be forced to pay retail cost (transmission,generation capacity and energy) to receive only wholesale energy? o Why should some customers be advantaged at the cost of other customers on the system?

    • Would probably not advantage a commercial customer with a

      demand/energy rate structure

    • Could benefit cost recovery for residential customer-generators

      FINAL COMMENTS

…pursuing a 25×25 renewable energy goal (similar to Ohio’s legislation that mandates renewable energy)

However, intermittent renewable energy does not, and cannot, cure the shortage of economical base-load generation

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