Will BigWind ‘Trick or Treat’ the American taxpayers?

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TRICK! Charles McConnell, executive director of Rice University’s Energy and Environment Initiative and a former assistant secretary of Energy at the Department of Energy under Obama was interviewed about the federal Clean Power Plan and flatly asserted that “If you look at it, really, fundamentally it’s more or less a forced renewable portfolio standard that requires the deployment of an enormous amount of wind. If you boil it down, that’s really what we’re talking about. It’s approximately 127,000 new windmills in the next 15 years in this country that’ll take up, if they were all deployed, about 10 million acres of land.” We urge everyone to read the interview with McConnell below.

BEST TREAT OF ALL! Another great interview with Ohio Senator Bill Seitz who spoke with a Michigan news outlet. Seitz explained, “As you can imagine, our committee recommendations aren’t popular with our enviro-socialist friends. But, in spite of what they say, this isn’t about clean energy versus dirty energy. It’s about efficient energy.” Seitz also stated, “The federal government has no power to tell states or utilities they need to have wind farms or how many they need to have.” And when asked if the average residents in Ohio realize the extent to which wind energy is actually reliant on fossil fuels, Seitz replied “No, most of the public and the press generally don’t know that. It’s a dirty little secret the public and press are unaware of [including the Cleveland Plain Dealer] and there are people who want to keep them unaware of it. Obviously, the better informed the general public is, the better off we’d all be.”…

CLIMATE:

Former DOE official McConnell says power plan a forced renewable portfolio standard

Aired: Wednesday, October 21, 2015

Does the Clean Power Plan help spur carbon capture and storage technology innovation and investments? During today’s OnPoint, Charles McConnell, executive director of Rice University’s Energy and Environment Initiative and a former assistant secretary of Energy at the Department of Energy, discusses the Obama administration’s fossil energy strategy and the challenges ahead for technological innovation. He also explains why he believes the Obama administration has been “disingenuous” about its plans for an all-of-the-above energy strategy.

Transcript

Monica Trauzzi: Hello, and welcome to OnPoint. I’m Monica Trauzzi. With me today is the Honorable Charles McConnell, executive director of Rice University’s Energy and Environment Initiative and a former assistant secretary of Energy at DOE from 2011 to 2013. Charles, it’s nice to see you. Thanks for coming on the show.

Charles McConnell: Pleasure.

Monica Trauzzi: Charles, you were one of the critics of the efficiency building block that was part of EPA’s draft Clean Power Plan. With that block out of the final rule, how has the game changed for coal as states begin crafting their compliance mechanisms and utilities strategize on investments?

Charles McConnell: Well, I think it’s pretty obvious what it is to coal, but it’s not just coal. It’s coal and gas. If you look at it, really, fundamentally it’s more or less a forced renewable portfolio standard that requires the deployment of an enormous amount of wind. If you boil it down, that’s really what we’re talking about. It’s approximately 127,000 new windmills in the next 15 years in this country that’ll take up, if they were all deployed, about 10 million acres of land.

Monica Trauzzi: From a technological standpoint, can that be met?

Charles McConnell: No, it can’t. And that’s a little bit of what’s flawed with many of the calculations and how some of the decision making and rulemaking came about is that, if you look at the practical aspects of it in terms of deployment and in terms of the reliability and cost for people in this country, it’s just really not something that’s … for our efforts here.

Monica Trauzzi: But there’s no directive written into the final rule specifically on wind — driving all the investments towards wind. There’s this Clean Energy Incentive Program that seeks to incentivize all clean energy, so why specifically do you think that this is going to drive wind?

Charles McConnell: Well, if you look at gas as an example, which a lot of people have seen as the replacement for coal, many of the states that are going to be bearing the burden of this — and by the way, of the 50 states, seven of the states bear roughly 40 percent of the responsibilities for all of the reductions. And so what you end up with are technical milestones and hurdles that, unless you do deploy wind, you’re — you’re unable to meet them…..

And the quote, above, from Senator Seitz= An article on liberty and free markets as sound public policy for Michigan, Michigan Capitol Confidential.

Source: Interview with Ohio Sen. Bill Seitz

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