Are you ‘sure’ you want your relative to work for BigWind?

I don’t know about you, but I work to earn money, period. Most people try to earn the most money they can, in order to provide for their family, and they will change jobs if they can earn more somewhere else. Apparently, the Democratic party and this administration, believe you should serve the renewable industry, for the sake of climate change (which renewables are not proven to change), and you should forego the salary you desire….

While the Democrats are gearing up for their convention in Philadelphia with a strong renewable platform, they do so against the backdrop of Pennsylvania energy policy concerns expressed last week: “Industry officials described government policies as crucial to the survival of a clean energy operation. For example, the federal wind production tax credit, which Congress in December extended for another five years, grants wind farm developers about $23 a megawatt-hour in tax credits when the projects begin producing electricity. That’s about a third of EverPower Wind Holdings Inc.’s capital costs of building wind farms, said Jim Spencer, president and CEO of the Strip District developer. Without the subsidies, EverPower’s projects in Pennsylvania — where construction costs are higher and wind speed is lower than in the Midwest — would not be able to compete, he said. “We’re suffering from low power prices from low natural gas, but in terms of our actual business environment, it’s almost never been better in the 17 years I’ve been in the industry,” said Mr. Spencer, whose company has grown to own about a third of the wind generation now installed in Pennsylvania and pulls in $150 million a year in annual revenue.”

This article also points out an important fact about the much touted jobs benefits from renewables: “The mismatch that we see is that jobs in the fossil fuel industry are high wage jobs, and jobs in clean energy generally aren’t,” Mr. Mosley said. “ That will be a problem for Mrs. Clinton who has promised to replace all the lost coal jobs with jobs in clean energy….

…For example, the federal wind production tax credit, which Congress in December extended for another five years, grants wind farm developers about $23 a megawatt-hour in tax credits when the projects begin producing electricity. That’s about a third of EverPower Wind Holdings Inc.’s capital costs of building wind farms, said Jim Spencer, president and CEO of the Strip District developer.

Without the subsidies, EverPower’s projects in Pennsylvania — where construction costs are higher and wind speed is lower than in the Midwest — would not be able to compete, he said.

“We’re suffering from low power prices from low natural gas, but in terms of our actual business environment, it’s almost never been better in the 17 years I’ve been in the industry,” said Mr. Spencer, whose company has grown to own about a third of the wind generation now installed in Pennsylvania and pulls in $150 million a year in annual revenue.

A central question surrounding employment is the role that clean energy plays in helping transition workers who have been laid off in the coal industry.

The young boilermaker or welder whose work is drying up as coal-fired power plants shut down is making $75,000 to $90,000 a year — salaries that aren’t being matched by jobs in clean energy, said Khari Mosley, regional programs manager for the BlueGreen Alliance, a national group advocating for both blue-collar workers and environmental issues.

“The mismatch that we see is that jobs in the fossil fuel industry are high wage jobs, and jobs in clean energy generally aren’t,” Mr. Mosley said. “One of the things we’re trying to figure out is how to bridge that gap.”…

Source: Industries give Pa. clean energy policies mixed reviews

Advertisements