If BigWind wants to play with fossil fuels, then it needs to PAY fair share of TAXES

We have to love the quote below, ‘you (BigWind) also have an impact, and the state has an interest in mitigating that impact. That’s what taxes are for’ That sentence should end in a exclamation point, instead of a period, because BigWind ALL OVER THE USA doesn’t seem to understand this concept.  Additionally, this is well stated below, ‘I appreciate the fact that people can say it has great environmental benefits, but those are people who don’t live next to them, or whose wildlife habitat isn’t being disrupted, or the bird population isn’t being affected, or whose view isn’t being altered’.  BigWind produces FEW jobs, LITTLE energy (compared to traditional fuels) and CONSUMES THOUSANDS of acres, yet it wants lucrative tax deals. Look below, at how much BigWind pays, compared to the traditional energy producers…pathetic.  The Ohio PILOT, payment in lieu of taxes, should be abolished for BigWind. If BigWind wants to play with the big boys in the energy sector, then it needs to pay a fair share of taxes. Our Ohio PILOT allows them to pay, approximately, 1/6th of what they ‘should’ be paying to the Ohio taxpayer….

By failing to increase the tax on wind generation in Wyoming, even a small bit, the Joint Revenue Committee has given it an exalted status among the various energy producers in the state….

who feared that North America’s largest wind farm that’s been in the works for 10 years there would disappear.
The committee said it wanted to be more business-friendly and feared that changing course now with an additional tax could have grave consequences on proposed projects…

Opponents say that Wyoming already is at a disadvantage because it is the only state to tax wind.
The arguments sound very much like those made 40 years ago as Wyoming was emerging as a leader in the energy industry when coal mines started to be built in the Powder River Basin.
Companies protested the severance tax rate as an impediment to development. Wyoming still ended up approving a hefty severance tax. The argument was similar then to what it should be now: Yes, you bring jobs to the state, but you also have an impact, and the state has an interest in mitigating that impact. That’s what taxes are for.
Then, as now, some of our leaders recognized that Wyoming shouldn’t be afraid to take the offensive. If indeed Wyoming has the best wind, as one legislator said last week, it will be developed, just as its coal, oil, gas and uranium reserves have been developed.
The wind tax was suggested six years ago by then-Gov. Dave Freudenthal against the wishes of the wind industry….
It’s also worth noting another similarity between coal and wind. It is a product captured here, but sent out of state for the benefit of others, including the stockholders in the corporations running them.
“I appreciate the fact that people can say it has great environmental benefits, but those are people who don’t live next to them, or whose wildlife habitat isn’t being disrupted, or the bird population isn’t being affected, or whose view isn’t being altered,” Freudenthal said.
By the Legislative Service Office’s own study, the wind tax generated about $14.5 million in total in 2015 ($8.7 million for the six counties where projects are located) and $5.8 million for the state. Compared to that $1 per megawatt hour wind pays, coal companies pay $3.97 to $7.33 per ton of coal (depending on low or high quality BTUs), about $1.77 to $2.69 per megawatt hour. Natural gas pays $3.49 to $4.89 per metric cubic foot produced….

Put another way, taxes from those coal leases built new schools in Carbon County. Will taxes from industries in Carbon County build a new Campbell County High School in the future?…

In the end, the committee decided against even raising the tax by 25 cents. And it ended up with no answers to the niggling question of how the state will pay its future bills, particularly in school funding.
Source: How the wind blows

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