BigWind is NOT Green, but ‘Wildlife in a Blender’ RED

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Is the dirty TRUTH about BigWind beginning to spread? The Audubon society, well respected for caring for birds, has been blatantly biased in FAVOR of BigWind, aka Bird Blenders, but here we read about a professor sharing the TRUTH to a room of them. Bats are VITAL to our species! Why? Just read this excerpt from one of our past blogs, 

“…Estimates range between 600,000-1 million bats are killed every year by wind turbines. What will industrial turbines do, in the long run, to your family legacy? How much money do you want to spend on insecticides? Do you think it is responsible for you to accelerate the use of pesticides? You should think twice before signing a new lease when you consider how detrimental industrial wind turbines are to the bat populations. A new study published by the National Science Foundation finds that bats contribute over a billion dollars in value to corn farmers in preventing crop damage.  Boston University previously reported the economic value of bats as $72 per crop acre in avoided pesticide costs….”

In the grassy cornfields of Southern Illinois bats are on the hunt for insects, and according to new research, farmers have more than a billion reasons to be grateful for it.

Research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences today confirms that bats play a significant role in combating corn crop pests, saving more than $1 billion a year in crop damages around the world.

Many of Indiana’s bats are disappearing at an alarming rate, but if you’re hoping that means a bat is less likely to sneak into your attic or church, you’re out of luck.

A recent bat talk by Ball State University biologist Tim Carter to local Audubon Society members…

A longtime bat researcher who displays affection and admiration for the creatures, Carter has noticed that some species have become hard or impossible to find.

The primary cause is white-nose syndrome (WNS)…

Unfortunately, migratory bats are being killed by what Carter calls “wildlife in a blender,” or wind turbines. “People call this green energy,” he said recently to a crowd of bird lovers at Kennedy Library. “I call it red energy. I call them all kinds of terrible things.”

Not meaning to downplay the threat of wind farms to birds, but bird mortality at a wind farm is measured in dozens or hundreds, Carter said, while bat fatalities are measured in the thousands.

“A single wind farm can kill 4,000 bats in a single season,” he said.

The 150-foot-long blade of a wind turbine might not look like it’s moving fast, but on a windy day, it can complete one revolution in four seconds, which equates to the tip of the blade traveling more than 200 mph…

“Like it or not, we are part of the ecosystem,” Carter told The Star Press. “You can think of the ecosystem like a car. There are lots of parts and certainly some are more important than others. But we all know if you have enough parts on your car break, the car stops working and you are stranded.

“Species are the parts of the ecosystem. If we lose one or two we will likely be fine, but if we lose enough the ecosystem will struggle and eventually stop. That ecosystem is what makes the air we breathe, the water we drink and the food we eat. We need a healthy ecosystem for our existence.”…

Indiana professor article

BigWind FAILS in Hawaii. Will Ohio learn?

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Ohio will become a graveyard of industrial wind turbines, unless our citizenry educates themselves and others, about the realities of this industry. We canNOT rely on our legislators to protect us, as many have either been bribed by or have drunk the BigWind Kool-Aid.  Why is is that our legislators will not educate themselves about these realities? Why are they ONLY listening to the BigWind lobbyists, paid for decades, by our tax dollars??????? Maybe it is time for some new policitians, who know how to THINK…..

Recently, my wife and I were blessed with an early Christmas gift from our son. We spent a week in the beautiful state of Hawaii….I wish instead to tell you what I observed and discovered with relevance to the Hawaiian people’s experience with wind turbines.

At 7,000 feet above sea level, we stopped at a ranger station, and I had an interesting conversation with a young ranger who held a degree in biology from the University of Oklahoma….

When I asked about the wind turbines that rest silent and unmoving on the jetties close to the rugged seashores of the mountains, he responded with the following statement.

“We are more concerned with the ecology of our island than of wind energy. We have two species of bats that near extinction. That is more important to our people.”

He continued, “I am not an expert of wind turbines, but I do know they were installed around 2008, and they did not prove to be as efficient as they were advertised to be.”

We continued up the mountain to our destination, stopping at a sheep-shearing station around 9,000 feet for a meal. It was there our tour bus driver — another ranger, with a degree in wildlife management from UCLA — continued with his knowledge about the subject. He had listened quietly to the conversation that was engaged earlier in the day.

“The wind turbines are not cost efficient. When they stop working, the maintenance to repair them is not a good business move. Although we built them on shorelines where people do not live, their appearance is ghastly. Most of them remain still as they rust away. The big energy companies took advantage of the Hawaiian people.”

Broken promises:

The rusting wind turbines of Hawaii

A breathtaking sight awaits those who travel to the southernmost tip of Hawaii’s stunningly beautiful Big Island, though it’s not in any guidebook. On a 100-acre site, where cattle wander past broken ‘Keep Out’ signs, stand the rusting skeletons of scores of wind turbines….

Yet the 27-year-old Kamaoa Wind Farm remains a relic of the boom and inglorious bust of America’s so-called “wind rush,” the world’s first major experiment in wind energy.

At a time when the EU and the British Government are fully paid-up evangelists for wind power, the lesson from America — and the ghostly hulks on this far-flung coast — should be a warning of their folly.

— By Tom Leonard, a correspondent for Hawaii Free Press (www.hawaiifreepress.com/ArticlesMain/tabid/56/ID/6350/Broken-promises-The-rusting-wind-turbines-of-Hawaii.aspx)

Why do we not listen to the people in Hawaii, Indiana, Colorado, California, and New York when they warn us about the exploitations of wind energy companies? Is it the genuine desire to save our planet that makes us rush to hasty decisions created by outsiders? Is it the temptation of financial rewards for our family? It certainly cannot be based on research or history, for research warns of extreme danger and history speaks of consequences that result in regret as we rush to discover clean renewable energy…

Original article January 2019