BigWind WILL die, and then new problems begin

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We have blogged about this before.  In order to build a turbine, there are hundred of gallons of oil, toxic chemicals, concrete, steel, etc. that is generated.  Turbines do not last forever and certainly, they do not last anywhere near that of a traditional nuclear or coal facility. What happens then? Recycled? NOPE, well maybe a small portion. The reality is that tens of thousands of machines and concrete will end up in landfills. Yes, landfills. Real green energy, huh! And, if you are a farmer and the BigWind company rolls belly up, who will pay for this? Will you feel safe farming below a dilapidated turbine? Of course not….

…Germany now has 29,000 wind towers. The nightmare of scrappage and decontamination has already started, with 250MW decommissioned last year. Close to 10,000 towers must be decommissioned by 2023. One tactic has been to ship the toxic parts and rubble to corrupt African states to deal with. As for the US, it will have more than 720,000 tons of blade material alone to dispose of by 2040, blades being a particularly enduring space-age construct. 

There’s some public-record material about decommissioning US wind farms, and it’s not reassuring. In Minnesota, the ten-year-old Nobles Wind farm has 134 turbines of about 1.5MW and is operated by Xcel Energy. Xcel estimates a cost for scrapping each turbine at up to $US530,000, or $US71million total. Each turbine has a tip height of 120 metres. Just to scrap one 40m blade involves crunching composite material weighing more than 6 tonnes. The turbines themselves contain a smorgasbord of toxic plastics, oils, lubricants, metals and fibreglass.

As American Experiment points out, even $US71million doesn’t finance a thorough clean-up. The contracts oblige Xcel to restore the land to a depth of only 4 feet, i.e. about one metre, whereas the foundations go down 5 metres. Moreover, underneath the 56 square miles of this Minnesota wind farm is 140km of cabling and pipes. The documents don’t say if the cables would stay or go. But Palmer’s Creek, another wind farm in Minnesota with 18 turbines, will be allowed to leave cables in situ below four feet.

As to local terms, the Australian Clean Energy Council says:

Decommissioning means that the wind turbines, site office and any other ancillary infrastructure is removed from the site, and roads and foundation pads are covered and revegetated, allowing land to be returned to its former use.’ Elsewhere the council says, ‘Typical landowner contracts require that the turbine is removed from its concrete foundation, and that the turbine site is covered in topsoil so that farming activities can continue. (My emphases. Would government greenies allow a decommissioned mine a similar latitude?)….

What if the Operator goes into liquidation? This is perhaps one of the major potential risks of entering into any wind farm agreement. If the company that you enter into the agreement with (or its successor if they sell the rights) goes into liquidation, then there may be insufficient funds to de-commission the plant, and therefore the items could be left in place, potentially in a state of disrepair. If the equipment had value it would probably mean that it would be removed. There is a real risk however that useless equipment could be left on the property at the end of the Lease.

Others add that landowners have no title over abandoned wind farm material and can’t even sell it to defray their own clean-up costs….

The decommissioning issue will generate a new set of horror stories in the decade to come. Count on it.

When wind turbines die link

 

BigWind requires a BigDig (for expansion)

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We just blogged about this 4 days ago. From the couple of hundreds of gallons of oil, to the NON recyclable blades to the hundreds of lbs of rare earth elements, to the massive toxic batteries, there is NOTHING GREEN about renewable energy. This is a falsehood, a lie, spread by BigWind and their green fanatics. Please help us change the public opinion by learning the truth and sharing it with others…..
Democrats dream of powering society entirely with wind and solar farms combined with massive batteries. Realizing this dream would require the biggest expansion in mining the world has seen and would produce huge quantities of waste. “Renewable energy” is a misnomer. Wind and solar machines and batteries are built from nonrenewable materials. And they wear out. Old equipment must be decommissioned, generating millions of tons of waste….

What do ya mean, Wind Turbines AREN’T Green?

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This article, could make you, both laugh and cry. We should cry because of the realities of this industry, as the USA adds tens of thousands of turbines every year; therefore, tens of thousands of blades end up in our landfills.  We should laugh b/c the company “did not respond” to the request for exact lifespan of these specific blades. This industry is very good at hiding/twisting the truth. I wouldn’t be surprised if they never responded to the question. One falsehood is that many believe each machine lasts 20-25 years. In reality, the gearbox and blades are the ‘Achilles heel’ of each turbine and require frequent maintenance. Just ask their insurers! We have blogged about this reality, before! In Van Wert, Ohio, for instance, we have pictures of dozens of blades lined up in neat and tidy rows. Why? Our industrial wind site is nowhere near 20 years old???!!!!…..

The disposal of approximately 1,000 wind turbine blades at the Casper (Wyoming) Regional Landfill will generate an estimated $675,485….

the blades and the motor housing are non-recyclable because they are made from fiberglass.

Instream Environmental did not respond immediately to Oil City’s request for comment on Thursday, Aug. 1, so it is unclear the exact lifespan of these specific blades…

Landfill link

 

What would Ohio farmer do with this ‘rare’ BigWind event?

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Why is it that something, BigWind touts as ‘RARE’, seems to be occurring so darned often?? We have blogged about countless fires. This nacelle (middle of machine) is described as being as large as a school bus and we know the blades to be longer than a football field.  People, mistakenly, do not realize the size and danger of these machines.  We liken it to walking the strip in Las Vegas.  A casino may ‘appear’ to only be a block away, but our view is distorted because of the size. The walk ends up being much farther away.  Turbines ‘appear’ to be small machines, from a distance, but in reality, they are very large industrial machines.  Such machines do NOT belong next to a child’s playground or a home! Imagine if this fire had occurred in Ohio during a summer? The fire would have spread like a wildfire out West!…..

A wind turbine caught fire in West Pubnico, N.S., late Friday afternoon, throwing huge, burning pieces of material to the ground.

Firefighters were called to the scene…there was little firefighters could do to douse the flames.

“We couldn’t get nowhere near because the blades was still turning, so, and pieces was breaking off the blades,” he said. “So if a piece was to fall off, it would go a long ways with the wind and that. So it wasn’t safe to go nowhere near the tower at all.”…

Amiro said when the blades turn, the tips are more than 100 metres up in the air — too high to fight the fire from the ground….

Amiro said two of the blades were completely burned and the nacelle, the gearbox at the centre of the blades that’s “almost as big as a school bus” was also seriously damaged…

Amiro said it’s a good thing it was raining and the ground was covered with snow.

“If that would have been August, we’d still be there trying to put wood fire out,” he said Saturday morning.

Original article

Van Wert blade shear gets NO media attention? Help us change this!

Against the backdrop of an upcoming election and a diminishing legislative calendar, the wind lobby is working overtime to press its case for reduced setbacks.   President Trump is a broken record on fake news but what about “no news”?   A blade failure occurred at Avangrid’s Van Wert County Blue Creek project on August 26th.    The turbines in the project are 476’ and a 10-foot section was documented by the local people via use of a drone to have flown approximately 825’.    Neither a 1.1x turbine height from the property line nor a 1.2x distance as suggested in H.B. 114 would have protected the neighbors, children or livestock from the thrown fragment.   

 

In this recent case, it appears the “systems” designed to stop the turbine did not work.  The rotor continued to spin for at least ten minutes after the blade fragment was thrown.  Neighbors called 911.  The Avangrid representative arrived two hours after the failure.  As far as we know, there has been NO media report or statement from the Blue Creek operator. 

 

Likewise, in Texas where a blade failure caused an overspeed situation and possibility of fire, a family of five was evacuated from their home.   There has been almost no press coverage of this event which occurred on the same day as Blue Creek   Lack of access to timely, actual  failure reports is one more compelling reason for statutory protective setbacks measured from property lines.  As seen in the story below, the mechanical safeguards intended to prevent the Texas overspeed situation, did not work.  ….

Texas family forced to leave home

BigWind bullies Ohio community

How ILLogical is it for a community to pay 14 cents per kWh for electricity, when they can purchase it for 10? This is the dilemma of the city of Conneaut, Ohio.  You will read that the turbine has $250,000 worth of repairs and NexGen will happily repair it IF the city renews a 10 year purchase contract with them….for more expensive energy than they can purchase from the grid.  Once again, another turbine is plagued with expensive repairs. Don’t they pay this electric bill with tax dollars?….

The owner of a damaged wind turbine that provides some of the electricity used at Conneaut’s sewage treatment plant wants a reworked contract with the city in order to make repairs financially feasible.

City Manager James Hockaday told City Council members at Monday night’s work session that NexGen is seeking a 10-year extension to the existing 10-year contract that will expire in 2020. The company says it needs a new contract to make repairs to the 400-kilowatt turbine — which has been idle since a lightning strike at the end of February.

Lighting blasted away one of the turbine’s blades and essentially destroyed its generator, Hockaday said. NexGen has said it will cost $250,000 to fix the machine, erected in January 2010.

 To justify the expense, NexGen has submitted a contract proposal that would stretch the contract, set to expire in three years, through 2030. NexGen’s initial proposal calls for slight kilowatt-per-hour increases each of the contract years, officials have said.

The turbine supplies about 20 percent of the electricity used at the plant located along the Lake Erie shore.

In 2016, the city paid NexGen almost $59,000, according to information from the city finance office. In February, NexGen charged the city $11,135 for its services.

The city is not paying NexGen while the turbine is inoperable, Hockaday said.

Last year, the city paid NexGen a combined generation/distribution charge of 12 cents per kilowatt hour. In 2017, the seventh year of the 10-year original contract, the city is paying 12.5 cents per kWh, according to the finance office. NexGen’s combined charge will climb to 12.9 cents per kWh next year, topping out at 14 cents in 2020, per the contract.

Direct Energy has been the primary power supplier to the sewage plant, and is filling the void left by the turbine, officials said. Direct Energy this year is charging a combined 10 cents per kWh, Finance Director John Williams said at Monday’s meeting.

Hockaday told council the city has multiple options regarding the turbine, such as explore pricing available through conventional utilities, talk with other turbine operators or negotiate with NexGen.

“We can counter-offer (NexGen),” he said. “(The contract) is a proposal.”

Hockaday said he feels the turbine has merit…

Source: Conneaut will examine options regarding damaged turbine | Local News | starbeacon.com

BigWind ‘autopsy’ will educate students alright

I suppose autopsies can, theoretically, be useful in fields other than medicine.  Take for instance, the broken turbine story below.  More often than not, it does appear as though turbines don’t operate well for schools.  They often need expensive repairs, repairs that the schools cannot afford, and rarely produce the energy they promise- no surprise. Anyway, this story involves a new strategy.  Maybe if students start studying the autopsies of BigWind deaths- an epidemic in America- they will become educated about the waste of taxpayer dollars given to this failing industry. An industry that produces intermittent, expensive energy that must always be backed up with fossil fuels…..

The blades and other components were removed this week from the two 30-foot-tall, 100-kilowatt wind turbines on the campus of Lake Land College as part of a remediation project for these damaged, malfunctioning turbines.

However, the south turbine tower and its nacelle equipment housing have been left standing for ongoing educational use by students in the Renewable Energy Program at Lake Land. A set of turbine blades and the north turbine’s nacelle will be left at ground left for student use, as well.

The two 100-kilowatt wind turbines were installed near the West Building in 2012. Vice President for Business Services Bryan Gleckler said the north turbine was funded by a federal grant and the south one was funded by a state grant from the Illinois Department of Commerce & Economic Opportunity….

 “They never really operated at the level we hoped,” Gleckler said of the performance of the two wind turbines.

Source: Wind turbine blades removed | Local | jg-tc.com