What happens to old/broken BigWind BLADES?

How many of you have heard that dead/obsolete wind turbines can be recycled? This is a common myth. If the average wind turbine lasts a mere 10-15 years (per some very good studies), then we have A LOT of blades going to landfills over the next few decades, as wind sites explode across our continent! Additionally, note what a difficult task it is to BUILD the crane on site that disassembles the machines- it takes 20 semis to carry the parts!  With such an energy intensive transport and expense, do you really believe that these companies do the appropriate maintenance on their machines? Like change the 200 gallons of oil in the nacelle every 5 years? Do you believe that our counties can afford to pay for the decommissioning when the turbines die? If you do believe this, then I have some land to sell you….

Starting June 8 and continuing over the next two months, 14 turbines will be repaired at DTE Energy’s Echo Wind Park (Michigan)….

One crane is currently in position on Crown Road between Farver and Maxwell roads in Chandler Township. Another crane will be delivered in the coming week and placed to the east of the initial crane on Crown Road between Farver and North Elkton roads.

“One will be assembling the blades, and another will be assembling a crane,” Serafin said. “The first seven will be all new blades, the second seven will be recombining all the good blades.”…

Occasionally, you’ll see the crane boom up,” he said. “Typically, they can take a rotor down, disassemble the blades and have the rotor back up within a day or two. It takes about 20 semis to move all the crane parts. It’s really not going to be that noticeable.

“If you happen to notice (the crane), you will stop because it’s pretty impressive to see the huge blades go up.” …

During Tuesday’s board of commissioners meeting, Board Chairman Clark Elftman asked Serafin of the fate of non-functioning blades….

Serafin said the blades will be destroyed, with the exception of the root, mid-section and tip of a blade to be donated to three educational institutions, per the request of the planning commission. 

via DTE to repair 14 turbines; Work set to begin in June; 19 other blades get OK – Huron Daily Tribune: Local News.

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How ‘green’ is BigWind’s 45 tons of concrete and 630 yards of concrete PER turbine?

We invite you to look at the photos at http://www.cashton.com/North_Wind_Turbine_Const-DM-CS-SB-2-reduced-in-size.pdf .

These pictures are wonderful views of wind “farmers” planting 45 tons of rebar and 630 yards of concrete to grow one wind turbine.  How ‘green’ is this? It is certain nothing else will ever “grow” in this field. Can you imagine the quality of the field and drainage tiles after this construction? Remember, there will be maintenance with the crane, again, at approximately 5 years – if the developer changes the (approximate) 200 gallons of oil in the nacelle. Don’t forget to check our out FARMER tab on our website. It has links to problems that wind ‘farmers’ can experience….

 

Weren’t we told that BigWind was “safe”?

Wasn’t an Ohio community recently told that these turbines are “safe”? How far away will one of these things fly in high winds? Additionally, look at the complications of dealing with such a “rare” incident- I guarantee you this- these incidents will become significantly less “rare” as we blanket our farmlands with these industrial machines. How far away is enough? We are in the middle of an experiment, particularly at schools which have one of these machines on site…And, how would you like to be this farmer, who now risks further damage to his fields when they bring the crane in for repair. Who will determine how “soft” the ground is and when it is appropriate to move the crane on site? 

It stands idle on the northeast side of Tipton County, one of its three blades broken off. But more than two weeks after wind turbine G14 lost its blade, it is still unclear why, and when the turbine will be back up and running.

The turbine’s size and the equipment needed to take it apart to determine what caused the break are making for a difficult repair schedule.

A representative of E.On who asked not to be identified said Tuesday that the company is in the process of acquiring a rare crane, which will be brought to Tipton County to disassemble the entire turbine hub. The turbine, which is located in the Wildcat Wind Farm near 650 North and 725 East in Windfall, broke on the afternoon of Feb. 1.

Once a crane arrives, E.On will be able to conduct studies to determine what caused the break, but that could take until late March because there are only a few of those types of cranes available in the U.S. Heavy snowfall this winter also could complicate the process of bringing in equipment to disassemble the turbine if the ground is still soft when the crane is available, the E.On representative said….

via Cause of turbine blade break unknown » Local News » Kokomo Tribune; Kokomo, Indiana.