What do we do with Toxic BigWind trash??

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More than 10,000 of the existing 28,000 turbines need to be decommissioned!! Can you imagine multiple industrial wind energy sites like this? When each one consumes tens of thousands of acres? What are we doing to our landscape, our neighbors, our countryside. Oh, but wait, we forgot, BigWind claims THEY will decommission and take care of their machines- HAHAHA.  And, how, my goodness, HOW is this environmentally friendly? It’s NOT! It’s time to change the discussion and highlight the truth about these industrial sites. There is nothing green about industrial wind energy turbines….except the green $$$ the taxpayer gives to them…

Germany has more than 28,000 wind turbines — but many are old and by 2023 more than a third must be decommissioned. Disposing of them is a huge environmental problem. Expert Jan Tessmer tells DW he’s optimistic.

DW: Dr Tessmer, disposing of wind turbines is extremely difficult.  Their concrete bases go as deep as 30 meters into the ground, and are hard to fully remove, while the rotor blades contain glass and carbon fibers — they give off dust and toxic gases so burning them isn’t an option. Some environmentalists say this problem is being swept under the carpet, what do you think?…

Jan Tessmer: I actually think everything is relative. Of course it is an issue and of course you don’t get anything for free, but you always have to see it in relation, what are the values you get out of the wind turbine and I think yes, some efforts have to be made to efficiently, and also without environmental  damage, get turbines recycled or out of the ground.

There are huge concrete foundations that have to be gotten out but I don’t see there being any principal problem  that could not be overcome. It will probably be a challenge for technology. It will really be an issue over the next years and decades probably to get old turbines off the field, so I expect industry will find technologies to cope with it.

Is the difficulty in disposing of wind turbines hurting wind energy’s reputation as a green power source?

Yes, sure…DW eco@africa - wind turbines in Germany (picture-alliance/dpa/P. Pleul)

Wind turbines pose a big environmental problem when it comes to disposing of them…

Do you think that environmentalists are still mostly pro wind energy or do you think there’s been a pushback regarding the difficulties in disposing of wind turbines?

I think we have more and more problems with the issue of acceptance. I wouldn’t say it’s because of the disposal issue, I think it’s more on issues like noise or the lightning effects during the night, that people feel disturbed. I don’t think people think so much about the disposal issue, although it might be important and I also think that we have to address this issue.

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(Big)Wind NOT a boon for ALL Van Wert county, Ohio, residents

Wind not a boon for all Van Wert County residents

This letter is in response to Jason Dagger’s guest perspective concerning a PILOT for Logan County. Van Wert County went through this just a few years ago and we know the local Van Wert Chamber of Commerce director, Susan Munroe(currently employed by ALLEN COUNTY), is active in promoting wind energy for both Iberdrola and Apex. We are unsure how promoting wind energy around the country is a part of her job in supporting the local prosperity of our community. Yes, the construction of an industrial wind site brought temporary jobs for the months it was under construction, When construction was finished only a few positions were established for the maintenance of these turbines. The Blue Creek project manager has not even bought a home in our community nor has he moved his family here although there are plenty of residences for sale under the windmills. We were also told when we built the new schools that the industries would be impressed and decide to locate here. It hasn’t happened. We even have a mega-site that is ready for occupancy and no one seems to be interested in that either.

What we have had instead are landowners who were leased from at different rates. Decommissioning bonds set at, I believe, $5,000 per turbine in Van Wert County vs. $75,000 in Paulding County. Farmers whose crop yields will never be the same again because of the destruction of massive cranes traveling across farm drainage. Roads will never be close to original condi- tion. Many homeowners suffer from headaches, nausea, sleep deprivation etc. The Blue Creek wind project refused to hand over post-construction reports on bird and bat kill even though an area exterminator has to clean under the windmills before the coyotes do. Expect massive bird kill as Ohio is on many migratory routes. The bald eagle is starting to be re-established in this area and what a shame it will be if this protected bird is destroyed by wind energy.

Two of the county schools have reaped benefits and are almost giddy at what wind energy has provided them. They seem to forget where the money originated. You and me. Now some of the poorer districts around the state want their share. What is to stop Columbus from taking from the rich districts to give to the poor? Sounds like Robin Hood.

Now there is “buyer remorse” by those who leased their valuable farms. They are promised where the meteorological towers and turbines will be placed, but it is never where they say because the landowner has given his property right over to the wind developer. He can’t even park his wagons on the drive back to the tur- bine to fill them during harvest even though he owns the land. There is something about a no interference clause. You can’t even build on your own property without permission nor plant trees.

Wind energy is like a very attractive woman, but anybody who has a relationship with her ends up with extremely serious social issues.

http://www.examiner.org/images/WebEdition/041916_BEweb.pdf

 

Farmers’ coalition warning us about BigWind !!!

Please share with your neighbors and family members. The $ offered to farmers is very enticing….

The Informed Farmers Coalition IFC was formed five years ago to study the impacts of wind turbines on our agricultural and residential community. The group consists of past or present union iron workers, school teachers, township officials, lawyers, a farm manager, a plumber, a fireman, a mechanic, school board members, county board member, union truck drivers, a dentist, retail workers, construction workers, nurses, union equipment operators, hospital workers, a social worker, bookkeepers, a school administrator, salesmen, an electrical engineer for Com Ed, an EMT, numerous local business owners, large/small landowners, homeowners, and of course, farmers – many of whom are the third and fourth generation on that farm. Many are lifetime residents of this agricultural community.

They have discovered, through sworn testimony throughout the state, that people are suffering from the same health issues, noise disturbances, untruthful wind company promises, property value losses, etc. The ongoing research brings the discovery our local landowners may be responsible for the property taxes and decommissioning of the wind turbine should the wind company walk away from the project. The turbine property tax bill stays in the name of the landowner with the bill being listed c/o of the wind company. So ultimately if the wind company doesn’t pay, it will be sent to the landowner.

IFC became aware some of our local landowners with signed contracts had never seen a map where their turbines were projected to be placed. The map presented with the petition to the county also shows underground transmission lines. Some landowners were not aware transmission lines would go through their property and did not think they had signed up for that. One landowner agreed to a contract but for only 80 acres of his property. But when IFC was researching at the county, they discovered his contract was filed containing all 560 acres of his property.

The real experts about wind turbines are the citizens living among them. IFC has attended numerous county meetings across the state of Illinois only to realize the people testifying under oath all have the same story – homes where they can no longer live or sell due to noise and health issues; wind companies that townships must sue to collect their rightful money; trespassing of heavy equipment on non-participating land that compact the soil for years as well as damage crops and tile; crop dusting problems; GPS systems that no longer get a signal; cell phones and TV reception problems; etc.  IFC is aware that Lifeline helicopters may not choose to land in a turbine area; this was needed this spring for a local farm accident. A letter from a school superintendent states the children in his school district are suffering from the effects of the turbines, since they went online.

IFC also became aware that once a person signs a contract they have agreed to a gag order that restricts them from talking about the wind company…

via Guest Commentary | BCRNews.com.

Illinois dead turbines create a headache for county and farmers

In Illinois where Everpower purchased the assets of a bankrupt wind facility, local authorities debated how to handle decommissioning costs.  The debate revolves around whether having the cash up front is best or whether to allow Everpower to simply have a letter of credit.  The Bureau County residents  researched the costs associated with decommissioning and estimate it would be.  “The group of residents had an in-depth study done by a Virginia-based company on decommissioning costs, looking at a specific 87-turbine wind farm, Gerdes said. The total cost to take down 87 turbines was just over $19.4 million, or about $224,000 per turbine. At that rate, the cost to decommission the Big Sky wind farm could be more in the $10 million to $12 million, he said.” 

It was interesting to see the Bureau County State’s Attorney advise that if Everpower was not able to take the turbines down, it would be the responsibility of the leaseholder.  In response to a comment from a local citizen, the Attorney said that “I would think these landowners would start thinking twice but nobody attends these meetings to ask or listen to what could happen to the land in our county.  I guess my question would be to anyone who has a lease, is the $8,000 or $10,000 you get a year worth it when is 10, 15 or 20 years it may cost you, the leaseholder over $250,000 to take it off your own property?  This is so sad that this is all coming out now and not sooner.”…

The county of Bureau is moving into negotiations with the new owners of the Big Sky wind farm, located north of Ohio, to determine just how future decommissioning costs of the Big Sky wind farm will be met.

The Bureau County Board’s decision to go into negotiations followed a lengthy board discussion at Tuesday’s meeting, which also included comments from a concerned resident as well as comments from a representative of the new Big Sky owner, the Pittsburgh-based EverPower Wind Co. The new owner has asked the county board to agree to a letter of credit for the decommissioning plan, rather than keep the current cash-on-hand arrangement….

Bureau County resident Ed Gerdes addressed the board, representing a “big group of us,” who are concerned about the decommissioning plan, specifically the amount of money for the decommissioning plan and how that money would be guaranteed.

The group of residents had an in-depth study done by a Virginia-based company on decommissioning costs, looking at a specific 87-turbine wind farm, Gerdes said. The total cost to take down 87 turbines was just over $19.4 million, or about $224,000 per turbine. At that rate, the cost to decommission the Big Sky wind farm could be more in the $10 million to $12 million, he said.

“Who’s going to pay for the rest?, ” Gerdes asked.” I don’t think the taxpayers should have to pay for taking those down.”

The group’s other concern is that when landowners signed their leases with these companies they were promised the companies would take down the turbines or, if the company was no longer here, the county would have the needed money set aside to take the turbines down, Gerdes said. But Bureau County is not going to have enough money and the landowners might end up with a bill for $150-$200,000 to dispose of the turbines, he said….

via Decommissioning costs still a concern | BCRNews.com.

Is Everpower trying to ‘pull the wool’ over a county’s eyes?

Ohio does not require money in escrow to protect our citizens from a company going bankrupt. Our bonds aren’t even big enough to pay for the cranes which will dismantle the machines, but this county was SMART. Why is Everpower requesting this? Could it be that they plan to leave this area after a short time? Because these foreign companies are given accelerated depreciation and then tax subsidies for the 1st 10 years of production, some companies ‘leave Dodge’ at approximately year 7. Remember, the gearbox warranties typically expire at year 5 and some studies show an actual turbine life of only 10-15 years….Everpower appears to be making exit plans….

When the Big Sky wind farm started a few years ago in Bureau County, it set aside money in escrow, in case the company abandoned the project and the county needed to take down the turbines.

That money was required by the county. The account contains nearly $1.8 million.

Now, the wind farm’s prospective owner wants to do away with the escrow account and go, instead, with a letter of credit, which is a bank-guaranteed promise to pay….

Ever Power has 114 turbines, about evenly split between Bureau and Lee counties, many of which surround the Bureau County village of Ohio.

Deb Anderson, who lives in that area, has long called for more regulation of wind turbines, including tough decommissioning standards.

“A letter of credit is only as good as the paper it’s written on,” Anderson said. “The way the banking industry is right now, what’s to say the bank won’t go belly up?”

Besides, she said, the nearly $1.8 million is nowhere near the amount of money that would be needed to take down the turbines.

Former Franklin Grove Village President Bob Logan, who has researched wind energy issues, agreed.

“Cash escrow means you have the money on hand,” Logan said. “If the [wind] companies go bankrupt, as many of them do, the letters of credit are worthless. Cash escrow is definitely better than a line of credit.”…

via Firm wants requirement loosened in Princeton | SaukValley.com.