BigWind bullies Ohio community

How ILLogical is it for a community to pay 14 cents per kWh for electricity, when they can purchase it for 10? This is the dilemma of the city of Conneaut, Ohio.  You will read that the turbine has $250,000 worth of repairs and NexGen will happily repair it IF the city renews a 10 year purchase contract with them….for more expensive energy than they can purchase from the grid.  Once again, another turbine is plagued with expensive repairs. Don’t they pay this electric bill with tax dollars?….

The owner of a damaged wind turbine that provides some of the electricity used at Conneaut’s sewage treatment plant wants a reworked contract with the city in order to make repairs financially feasible.

City Manager James Hockaday told City Council members at Monday night’s work session that NexGen is seeking a 10-year extension to the existing 10-year contract that will expire in 2020. The company says it needs a new contract to make repairs to the 400-kilowatt turbine — which has been idle since a lightning strike at the end of February.

Lighting blasted away one of the turbine’s blades and essentially destroyed its generator, Hockaday said. NexGen has said it will cost $250,000 to fix the machine, erected in January 2010.

 To justify the expense, NexGen has submitted a contract proposal that would stretch the contract, set to expire in three years, through 2030. NexGen’s initial proposal calls for slight kilowatt-per-hour increases each of the contract years, officials have said.

The turbine supplies about 20 percent of the electricity used at the plant located along the Lake Erie shore.

In 2016, the city paid NexGen almost $59,000, according to information from the city finance office. In February, NexGen charged the city $11,135 for its services.

The city is not paying NexGen while the turbine is inoperable, Hockaday said.

Last year, the city paid NexGen a combined generation/distribution charge of 12 cents per kilowatt hour. In 2017, the seventh year of the 10-year original contract, the city is paying 12.5 cents per kWh, according to the finance office. NexGen’s combined charge will climb to 12.9 cents per kWh next year, topping out at 14 cents in 2020, per the contract.

Direct Energy has been the primary power supplier to the sewage plant, and is filling the void left by the turbine, officials said. Direct Energy this year is charging a combined 10 cents per kWh, Finance Director John Williams said at Monday’s meeting.

Hockaday told council the city has multiple options regarding the turbine, such as explore pricing available through conventional utilities, talk with other turbine operators or negotiate with NexGen.

“We can counter-offer (NexGen),” he said. “(The contract) is a proposal.”

Hockaday said he feels the turbine has merit…

Source: Conneaut will examine options regarding damaged turbine | Local News | starbeacon.com

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Illinois ‘over’pays for BigWind power, will Ohio?

 

Wise people learn from the mistakes of others, so they don’t repeat the mistakes, themselves. Will Ohio legislators learn from this lesson (and a multitude of other states and countries)? Let us hope so, for the sake of our businesses and residents…

For Springfield aldermen opposed to the 10-year-old Sierra Club deal that required the city to buy power from two wind farms, December 2018 can’t come fast enough.
By then, both contracts will have expired, at which point City Water, Light and Power estimates it will have spent up to $150 million. So far, the utility has spent about $101 million.
Ward 10 Ald. Ralph Hanauer, who wasn’t on the city council when the deals were approved, calls the wind-power contracts “the most costly mistake in the city of Springfield.” He added that the lack of a clause that allows the restructuring of the contacts to keep costs closer to market value — as just happened with CWLP’s coal contract — was part of the mistake….

The Sierra Club’s wind-power agreement… The 2016 price for both contracts for wind power is $58.97/MWh, according to figures provided by the city.
The variable cost of producing the same power from CWLP’s own generation has been about half that — less than $30/Mwh — over the course of the wind contracts. And the new price in the most recent coal contract makes CWLP’s variable cost of generation even lower — roughly $17 to $26/MWh, depending on the unit….

“Wise economics should determine whether future wind and solar investments are pursued,” McMenamin said. “Generally speaking, going forward, municipally owned electric utilities should concentrate on electricity distribution rather than generation.”…

“At the time, we didn’t realize how devastating it was going to be,” Redpath said.
While walking his ward and talking to the residents, Redpath said he’s run into a lot of people who are opposed to the wind-power contracts.
“There’s definitely a lesson for the future,” he said. “We have to be very, very careful when this contract comes back up. I don’t know how I could vote for it in most any form.”
Source: CWLP shells out $100M-plus for wind power

States that pay the most for power FORCE you to BUY BIGWIND

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(note California, the leader in BigWind) video here: Foxbusinessnews

In the video with Stu Varney, with energy expert Robert Bryce, he details the insane cost of attempting to power economies with sunshine and breezes; and does what policy makers have failed or refused to do: he connects the bitter consequences, born by the many, with the follies of the feckless few.New study finds states that offered greater support for green energy, pay more for electricity. Manhattan Institute Senior Fellow Robert Bryce with more….(stopthesethings.com)

Why don’t our Ohio Representatives understand this simple truth? Instead, they are being persuaded by the sales teams who advocate for BigWind, like Iberdrola, Everpower, Apex and now Amazon. Remember, Amazon wants to purchase the wind energy, but NOT build their facilities withIN a wind energy blueprint…hmmmmm…..

Source: States that pay the most for power

Are you willing to pay more taxes to support BigWind? See what MIT thinks

I don’t know about you, but I think I pay enough in taxes. Particularly, when I read the ’50 examples of government waste’ by the Heritage Foundation. Enough is enough. MIT has a tremendous reputation of graduating and recruiting some of the brightest minds in America. It is no surprise, then, that they have confirmed what so many of us have been screaming for years.  Now, if you live in Ohio, know that BigWind is pushing our legislature to reduce our wind turbine setbacks, so they can plant MORE turbines across our state!! What happens if the rug is pulled out from under this renewable technology? What will happen to the structures that will dot our landscape? They will deteriorate and then become dangerous, as maintenance will be cost-prohibitive. Who is then at risk? Everyone below…

Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have confirmed what many in the energy world already knew: Without government support or high taxes, green energy will never be able to compete with conventional, more reliable power plants.

The study, announced by MIT’s News Office Wednesday, determined that conventional energy would be consistently less expensive than green energy over the next 10 years. The study concludes that the government could make green energy competitive by offering enormous amounts of taxpayer support.

The study confirms that green energy can only work when energy prices are extremely high and require government support. Projections from the International Energy Agency estimate that developing wind and solar power enough to substantially impact global warming could cost up to $16.5 trillion by 2030….

The MIT study also noted that solar and wind power are more than twice as expensive as natural gas, and tax on carbon dioxide emissions could increase electricity prices enough for green sources to compete. Even environmental groups such as The Sierra Club worry increasingly cheap energy will make the case for green power weaker.

“Wind and solar can’t compete with conventional sources on their own merits,” Chris Warren, a spokesperson for the Institute for Energy Research, told The Daily Caller News Foundation. “That’s why the national environmental lobby and their allies are peddling the idea of a carbon tax. They want to punish the use of natural gas, oil and, coal to make their preferred sources appear more profitable. In practice, a carbon tax would have a devastating impact on American families already struggling in the Obama economy–hurting the poor and middle class the most.”

Critics have said carbon taxation disproportionately harms the poorest members of society….

 

Source: MIT: Green Energy Can’t Work Unless You Tax Everything Via @dailycaller

What is the True Cost of Electricity? More thanks to the EPA

This data substantiates what we have been saying for years. BigWind will make our electricity rates skyrocket, which destroys jobs, families, and our way of life.  Americans need to stand up to this administration, this EPA, and this liberal agenda before it is too late….and it is almost too late!!! What will the Ohio study mandate committee decide to do with our renewable portfolio standard? Let us hope they use common sense. 

Today, the Institute for Energy Research released a first-of-its-kind study calculating the levelized cost of electricity from existing generation sources. Our study shows that on average, electricity from new wind resources is nearly four times more expensive than from existing nuclear and nearly three times more expensive than from existing coal. These are dramatic increases in the cost of generating electricity. This means that the premature closures of existing plants will unavoidably increase electricity rates for American families….

The LCOE-E framework allows for cost comparisons that are relevant for today’s energy policymakers. For example, when all known costs are accurately included in the LCOE calculations, we find that existing coal ($38.4), nuclear ($29.6), and hydroelectric resources ($34.2) are about one-third of the cost of new wind resources ($112.8) on average. By increasing the transparency of the costs associated with policies favoring new resources over existing conventional resources, we hope to inform policymakers with the best available data and raise the level of the electricity policy debate….

What is the True Cost of Electricity? – IER.

Maui experiences power outage when the BigWinds stop blowing

This story will become commonplace as we put more industrial wind sites on our energy grid. Why? The wind does not blow at a constant rate. The output of an industrial wind turbine looks more like a polygraph test, with the line going up and down. Everytime the line drops down, we need traditional energy producers (coal,n.gas,nuclear,hydro) to make up that difference and this is where complexity exists. It is nearly impossible to allow for uninterupted energy supply when wind turbines are on/off/on/off.  Supposedly, this wind site utilizes batteries to store some of the excess load, but this technology is clearly flawed. Additionally, someone needs to tell them that batteries are anything BUT green for our environment. Would you like to live in a home where these ‘brownouts’ will become commonplace?  All of us will be, unless we can convince our legislators to wise up to the truth behind these machines….

The wind farm mills along Ulupalakua Ranch quit working for a while today. Maui Electric Company says  19,258 customers lost power today at 12:34 p.m. for about 20 minutes when the Auwahi Wind Farm tripped offline resulting in a sudden and severe loss of wind generation on Maui Electric’s system….

As a result, MECO was forced to “load shed” customers in order to protect and stabilize Maui’s electrical grid. Presumably that means shutting down as many customers as it takes to operate efficiently for as many customers as possible until the windmills were powering again….

Did The Lights Flicker For You, Too? – Maui’s Weekly Online and Television News Program.

Low wind speeds in 2015 cut BigWind production across USA

Wow, coupled with the fact that most BigWind sites produce less than 40% of their actual capacity, this is disasterous news. Does anyone think global warming could be to blame? 🙂

US: In the first quarter of 2015, wind speeds in California and Texas were the lowest in 47 years, according to weather monitoring firm Vaisala.

In January, nearly all states west of the Rocky Mountains, west US, saw wind speeds at least 20% below their long-term monthly average. Some areas experienced wind speeds nearly 50% below usual in January….

Project developer Pattern Energy said the low wind speeds meant it lost 5% of its annual expected production in the first quarter in the western US and Texas…

Low US wind speeds cut production | Windpower Monthly.