WOW, AWEA can’t do basic math

In Ohio, BigWind is/has building/proposing projects that consume, on average 16,000 acres each. Now, if we look at Blue Creek, alone, there are 152 turbines. 16,000 divided by 152 is 105 acres/turbine.  Obviously, each turbine does not take up 105 acres, but when you include setbacks, homes, roadways, communities, etc. AWEA is blatantly WRONG.  You canNOT extrapolate acreage based on the actual, physical consumption of land by the industrial wind turbine.  According to Ohio’s average land consumption of 16,000 acres, our math shows that the AWEA assumption needs to be revised to be multiplied by 141!! In this case, the mass of Rhode Island x 141 = 169,200 square miles…LARGER THAN THE SIZE OF CALIFORNIA.  And, does this actually power America? NO, because we need MORE coal and MORE gas to ‘backup’ the intermittency of the turbines….

…The Supreme Court put a hold on enforcement of the plan in February to allow legal challenges to it to be resolved in court. If the Court of Appeals rules that the government can legally enforcement the plan, the country will have to start using a lot more renewable energy (like wind and solar) — and much less coal — by the year 2030.

Part of the plan calls for the creation of incentives to encourage states to build wind farms. Though the US invested $14.5 billion in wind-power project installations last year, wind farms still provide less than 5% of the nation’s energy, according to the American Wind Energy Association.

But what would a US powered only by wind actually look like?

To answer that question, AWEA’s manager of industry data analysis, John Hensley, did the following math: 4.082 billion megawatt-hours (the average annual US electricity consumption) divided by 7,008 megawatt-hours of annual wind energy production per wind turbine equals approximately 583,000 onshore turbines.

In terms of land use, those 583,000 turbines would take up about the total land mass of Rhode Island, Hensley says, because wind projects typically require 0.74 acres of land per megawatt produced….

Source: Here’s how much of the US would need to be covered in wind turbines to power the nation

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(Big)Wind NOT a boon for ALL Van Wert county, Ohio, residents

Wind not a boon for all Van Wert County residents

This letter is in response to Jason Dagger’s guest perspective concerning a PILOT for Logan County. Van Wert County went through this just a few years ago and we know the local Van Wert Chamber of Commerce director, Susan Munroe(currently employed by ALLEN COUNTY), is active in promoting wind energy for both Iberdrola and Apex. We are unsure how promoting wind energy around the country is a part of her job in supporting the local prosperity of our community. Yes, the construction of an industrial wind site brought temporary jobs for the months it was under construction, When construction was finished only a few positions were established for the maintenance of these turbines. The Blue Creek project manager has not even bought a home in our community nor has he moved his family here although there are plenty of residences for sale under the windmills. We were also told when we built the new schools that the industries would be impressed and decide to locate here. It hasn’t happened. We even have a mega-site that is ready for occupancy and no one seems to be interested in that either.

What we have had instead are landowners who were leased from at different rates. Decommissioning bonds set at, I believe, $5,000 per turbine in Van Wert County vs. $75,000 in Paulding County. Farmers whose crop yields will never be the same again because of the destruction of massive cranes traveling across farm drainage. Roads will never be close to original condi- tion. Many homeowners suffer from headaches, nausea, sleep deprivation etc. The Blue Creek wind project refused to hand over post-construction reports on bird and bat kill even though an area exterminator has to clean under the windmills before the coyotes do. Expect massive bird kill as Ohio is on many migratory routes. The bald eagle is starting to be re-established in this area and what a shame it will be if this protected bird is destroyed by wind energy.

Two of the county schools have reaped benefits and are almost giddy at what wind energy has provided them. They seem to forget where the money originated. You and me. Now some of the poorer districts around the state want their share. What is to stop Columbus from taking from the rich districts to give to the poor? Sounds like Robin Hood.

Now there is “buyer remorse” by those who leased their valuable farms. They are promised where the meteorological towers and turbines will be placed, but it is never where they say because the landowner has given his property right over to the wind developer. He can’t even park his wagons on the drive back to the tur- bine to fill them during harvest even though he owns the land. There is something about a no interference clause. You can’t even build on your own property without permission nor plant trees.

Wind energy is like a very attractive woman, but anybody who has a relationship with her ends up with extremely serious social issues.

http://www.examiner.org/images/WebEdition/041916_BEweb.pdf

 

Apex whines (in Ohio) for BigWind setback changes

Apex continues to push for legislation to override property line setbacks. When Apex bought the approved BP project in Van Wert County, the old setbacks were in place. Now that Apex wants to pursue Phase II, they are confronted with the new setbacks and they are not happy about it. After reading press reports of Apex whining, Sen Seitz remarked,

“The most interesting thing about this article to me is that the former County Economic Development Director (Sarah Moser) is now working for the wind developer. That, plus the fact that the County benefits financially from the PILOTS while the township/village does not, makes it quite dangerous to allow the county commissioners to override the statewide setbacks. “

The Van Wert County Board of Commissioners heard an update on the Long Prairie wind farm project from Apex Clean Energy representatives and also talked to officials from county villages about economic development.

Scott Hawken and Sarah Moser from Apex Clean Energy provided an update on the project to the commissioners and representatives from the nine county townships that could potentially be included in one of the two planned phases of the Long Prairie wind turbine project. Representatives from the three school districts involved (Van Wert, Crestview, and Lincolnview) were also present, as was County Engineer Kyle Wendel and Van Wert Area Chamber of Commerce President/CEO Susan Munroe.
Hawken, Apex development manager, said the Ohio General Assembly was the biggest hurdle the project had to clear to become a reality.
“The major roadblocks slowing us down in development are the current setbacks the state has in legislation,” Hawken said, noting that industry groups are currently working to educate legislators on the impact the setbacks have had on Ohio wind energy projects….

Source: Apex gives wind energy project update

BigWind leaseholders in Michigan have regrets

How many of you think that all residents living INside industrial wind sites are happy? You need to listen to this Youtube video from residents & leaseholders in Michigan. Will this happen to our neighbors in Ohio? Remember, BigWind is now lobbying, in Ohio, to reduce our 1,250 foot setback and give the decision-making rights to our county commissioners….

Two Michigan residents share their experiences living inside utility scale wind plants. One is a long time supporter of wind energy and another is a man who has leased his ground to wind developers. Both now have profound regret….

https://youtu.be/ps6tJMSXKic

 

 

What are bats worth to our farmers? More than BigWind!

As Halloween approaches, we have scary news for Ohio farmers who want to lease acreage to BigWind. Bats are already under assault d/t the white nose fungus, but turbines are a close 2nd. Estimates range between 600,000-1 million bats are killed every year by wind turbines. What will industrial turbines do, in the long run, to your family legacy? How much money do you want to spend on insecticides? Do you think it is responsible for you to accelerate the use of pesticides? You should think twice before signing a new lease when you consider how detrimental industrial wind turbines are to the bat populations. A new study published by the National Science Foundation finds that bats contribute over a billion dollars in value to corn farmers in preventing crop damage.  Boston University previously reported the economic value of bats as $72 per crop acre in avoided pesticide costs. Union Neighbors United (Ohio) is continuing its challenge to the USFWS rules for threatened and endangered bats….

In the grassy cornfields of Southern Illinois bats are on the hunt for insects, and according to new research, farmers have more than a billion reasons to be grateful for it. 

Research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences today confirms that bats play a significant role in combating corn crop pests, saving more than $1 billion a year in crop damages around the world. Bat Conservation International funded the two-year experiment in cornfields near Horseshoe Lake in Southern Illinois, conducted by graduate student Josiah J. Maine and his adviser at Southern Illinois University Carbondale, Justin Boyles….

“The main pest in my system was the corn earworm, a moth whose larvae cause billions of dollars’ worth of damage to corn, cotton, tomatoes, and many other crops,” Maine said….

Keeping the bats out meant pests, such as the corn earworm, were largely free to reign havoc on the corn crops….To ensure only bats were excluded by the exclosures Maine moved the structures twice daily so birds could forage normally.

After analyzing the results, Maine said he found nearly 60 percent more earworm larvae inside the exclosures – protected from the hungry bats – than in the unprotected control areas. He also found more than 50 percent more corn kernel damage per ear in the corn inside the exclosures.

“By consuming crop pests, bats have tremendous ecological impacts in crop fields. Based on the difference in crop damage I observed, I estimated that bats provide a service to corn farmers worth about $1 billion globally” Maine said.

In addition to controlling pest populations, bats were also found to suppress pest-associated fungal growth found in corn— a money-saving agricultural service not reflected in Maine’s suggested estimate.

“This was sort of a serendipitous discovery of this research,” Maine said. “I found that [bats] seemed to be suppressing the population of crop pests and thereby suppressing the abundance of the toxic fungus and also the toxins produced by that fungus.”….

Source: Bats Worth More Than $1 Billion to Corn Industry | Agweb.com

Apex wants to blanket Van Wert County, Ohio with turbines

We have been watching Apex, since they purchased the leases for southern Van Wert county. Their plans are now official and stated on the website. A new office has been opened in Ohio City. What will the Van Wert county commissioners say this time? Despite complaints from farmers and townships, the commissioners only see $$$. May we remind you where all of the $$$ comes from….our pockets! Hundreds of millions of taxpayer $ will be given for the building of this project and it will produce less than a dozen long-term jobs. But, Apex will throw $ back to the leasing farmers and the county….pocket change for them. Why should YOURS and MY tax$ fund their project? It will also produce far LESS energy than they tell us! How do we know this? Because it is public information how much electrical energy wind sites produce and Van Wert county has dismal, pathetic results. These sites will never replace the energy we can produce from a coal, nuclear or natural gas plant. NEVER.

Apex Clean Energy has acquired the development rights for and is exploring the feasibility of constructing Long Prairie Wind, a wind energy project in rural southern Van Wert County, Ohio….

Source: Long Prairie Wind

IKEA/APEX BigWind problem causes LIENS to be Filed Against Local Farmers (Illinois)

How is this possible? Isn’t BigWind great for our communities? Isn’t IKEA a great store to shop in? They support renewable energy, so how can that be bad? Your mother probably taught you that if something ‘seems’ too good to be true, then it probably is. The $$$ that rolls into local farmers and communities from BigWind is not free. This $ is our tax dollars, hard at work, being handed to foreign-owned manufacturers, and then they kindly give a few of us, some pocket change, in order to make them appear to care about us and our communities.  This $ will never be enough to save neighbors from sleepless nights and headaches. This $ will never be enough to restore the acreage to its natural, prewind state.  This $ will never be enough to decommission the hundreds of thousands of ‘dead’ turbines that will dot our landscape in the next couple of decades. Farmers now need to realize that this $ may not appear at all and it may now affect their ownership rights and what they may (or may not) be able to pass on to the next generations. APEX is prowling in NW Ohio and now owns leases (formerly BP Wind Energy) that are South of Van Wert, county…

IKEA (the furniture company) and APEX (a wind energy company) failed to make payments to Ambassador Steel Fabrication, LLS from Auburn, Indiana. The failure of IKEA and APEX to make their payments in a timely manner is now causing issues for farmers and other land owners who leased their properties for the project. Below is a link(or click here for names) to the list of names which are found on the documents recorded at the Vermilion County Recorder’s office in Document # 14-09577. This document is a “NOTICE OF SUBCONTRACTORS CLAIM and ILLINOIS MECHANIC’S LIEN CLAIM-LEASEHOLD IMPROVEMENT” For details, please see the lien documents which you can view HERE and HERE.

The lien is for $1.4 million dollars.

If you know somebody on this list, perhaps they would be interested in knowing that their property will have a permanent record of having had this lien filed. Until IKEA/APEX settles this issue and the lien is released, it may be difficult to complete real estate or financial transactions.

A lot of questions arise out of this issue:

–Are ag input loans for fertilizer/seed affected?
–Will real estate transactions such as mortgages, land purchases using existing lien subject property as collateral at risk?
–Will there be legal problems for trustees if the benefactors of the trust learn their land is listed and subjected to a lien collection proceeding?

Before signing agreements to host wind turbines, access roads, or cables, remember that anything can happen. If a wind company fails, does a lien holder have rights to take action against the land owners? This list of  landowners (HERE) should probably review their lease agreements to see if they have a protections in place against complications….

IKEA/APEX Wind Farm Non-payment Causes Liens to be Filed Against Local Farmers – | Illinois Leaks.