Will Ohio legislators be liable if BigWind tragedy occurs here?

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Our Ohio legislators are delusional to believe that Ohioans are safe with these industrial machines planted next door to our homes. A German turbine scatters blade debris 800 METERS away from the turbine.  That is NOT a typo….800 METERS.  What is the current setback from a property line that our legislature is preparing to REDUCE? 1125 FEET.  Tragedy will happen someday and it will change the course of this industry; unfortunately, it will also change the course of a family’s lives.  Will it occur in Ohio first? Will our legislators be held liable for their actions??????????????????????????????????????????

Jimmy Fallon Makes the Best Argument Against BigWind

Jimmy Fallon Makes the Worlds Best Argument Against Solar and Wind Energy

 

Jimmy Fallon Makes the Worlds Best Argument Against Solar and Wind Energy

BigWind is a parasite that requires a host….

But a few years ago, when he was host of Weekend Update, Fallon made one of the best arguments ever why solar, wind, and other forms of renewable energy work very, very badly….

“…in the future, cars could be powered by hazelnuts.  That’s encouraging, considering an 8 oz. jar of hazelnuts cost about $9.  Yeah.  I’ve got an idea for a car that runs on bald eagle heads and Faberge’ eggs.”

In other words: if your form of energy is UNAFFORDABLE, who cares it it’s based on the sun or works in a lab?…

The diluteness problem is that the sun and the wind don’t deliver concentrated energy—unlike coal or oil—which means you need a lot of materials per unit of energy produced….mFor wind, they can include high-performance compounds (like those used in the aircraft industry) for turbine blades and the rare-earth metal neodymium for lightweight, high performance magnets, as well as the steel and concrete necessary to build thousands or tens of thousands of structures as tall as skyscrapers.

Here’s a comparison of how steel (and iron) intensive it is to generate electricity from wind as compared with coal, nuclear, or natural gas….

The only way for solar and wind to be truly useful, reliable sources of energy would be to combine them with some form of extremely inexpensive mass-storage system. No such mass-storage system exists, because storing energy in a compact space itself takes a lot of resources. Which is why, in the entire world, there is not one real or proposed independent, freestanding solar or wind power plant. All of them require backup—except that “backup” implies that solar and wind work most of the time. It’s more accurate to say that solar and wind are parasites that require a host….

As you look at the jagged and woefully insufficient bursts of electricity from solar and wind, remember this: some reliable source of energy needed to do the heavy lifting. In the case of Germany, much of that energy is coal. As Germany has paid tens of billions of dollars to subsidize solar panels and windmills, fossil fuel capacity, especially coal, has not been shut down—it has increased.

Why? Because Germans need more energy, and they cannot rely on the renewables.

They might be better off relying on hazelnuts.

Jimmy Fallon Makes the Worlds Best Argument Against Solar and Wind Energy.

Clean Energy’s Dirty Secrets and Hidden Costs to USA!

Are you confused as to why renewables can COST us $? And how can anyone say that they DON’T reduce our carbon emissions? Read below, and you will find excellent analyses of why they do NOT belong on our grid and how they will cost all of us in our pocketbook.  Thank you Governor Kasich and our legislators for passing SB 310 to ‘freeze’ our renewable mandates while their effects are studied!…

…In May of this year, President Obama declared the shift to clean energy a “fight” that was about shaping the sector “that is probably going to have more to do with how well our economy succeeds than just about any other.” At least on that, the president was right. If we get energy wrong, America will throw away the world-leading energy advantages bestowed on it by geology, technology, and capitalism….

Presenting the administration’s Clean Power Plan, EPA administrator Gina McCarthy admitted it was not about pollution control. “It’s about investments inrenewables and clean energy,” she told the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works in July. “This is an investment strategy.” The president’s favorite corporate-tax inverter has a different take on the nature of the investment opportunity. “We get a tax credit if we build a lot of wind farms,” Warren Buffett told Berkshire Hathaway’s investors. “That’s the only reason to build them. They don’t make sense without the tax credit.” While wind investors hoover up the $23 production tax credit per megawatt hour (MWh) of electricity produced, the real costs of intermittent renewables such as wind and solar are many times greater. And they’re not even good at what they’re meant to do — reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

Deriving a large proportion of energy from renewables is proving extremely costly for Germany…Despite lower economic growth in Germany than in the U.S., German emissions have been rising seven times faster — up 9.3 percent between 2009 and 2013 compared with 1.3 percent for the United States….

The closure of a nuclear-power station shows that something is amiss. Nuclear-power stations emit no carbon dioxide. Their running costs are low and much of the costs are unavoidable whether the stations are kept open or closed — construction and commissioning at the front-end, de-commissioning at the back. Since 2008, the output of America’s nuclear-power stations has fallen by 0.480 billion MWh, a decline of 6 percent. In a properly functioning market, this shouldn’t be happening….

To the life-cycle cost of renewables must be added short-term balancing and longer-term-capacity adequacy to match supply to demand. Because renewables output depends on the weather, an electricity system with a high proportion of renewables needs much more generating capacity. Without renewables, Britain would need 22GW of new capacity to replace aging coal and nuclear-power stations. With renewables, Britain will need 50GW, i.e., 28 GW extra to deal with the intermittency problem. And the more renewables in the system, the worse the problem is…

Levelized costs also ignore extra spending on grid infrastructure. Texas is the leading wind state, accounting for nearly 22 percent of the nation’s wind-generated electricity.  Transmitting electricity from wind farms in the rural north and west of the state to cities such as Dallas and Houston caused grid congestion. The state decided to have consumers back the inaptly named Competitive Renewable Energy Zones (CREZ) grid program to give wind investors a windfall subsidy in the form of access to nearly 3,600 miles of transmission lines. Subsidies via grid infrastructure spending can be more costly than overt plant-level subsidies. Bill Peacock and Josiah Neeley of the Texas Public Policy Foundation reckon that CREZ costs attributable to wind amount to $6.8 billion. This compares to plant-level subsidies of $4.14 billion in the ten years between 2005 and 2015.

Perhaps the dirtiest secret of renewables is how ineffective they are at displacing carbon dioxide emissions. Brookings senior fellow Charles Frank has calculated that replacing coal with modern combined-cycle gas turbines cuts 2.6 times more emissions than using wind does, and cuts four times as many emissions as solar.  If anything, these figures are likely to be too generous to renewables…

The most insidious and destructive effect of renewables, however, is on the wholesale electricity markets. Intermittent renewables, particularly wind, can flood the market at random times of day with zero marginal-cost electricity. The production tax credit means that renewable investors make money from negative prices down to minus $23 per MWh. Episodes of negative prices are evidence of an electricity market that isn’t working. They imply that what is being produced is garbage — someone has to be paid to take the electricity away.

Negative prices crush incentives to invest in the conventional capacity needed to keep the power on when the wind doesn’t blow and the sun doesn’t shine. The OECD report warns that gas, coal, and nuclear-power stations would experience lower electricity prices, reduced load factors, and higher costs because of intermittent renewables. To avoid the risk of “green outs” caused by inadequate investment in conventional and nuclear capacity, governments and regulators have to intervene and construct capacity markets to redress the distortion created by renewables. These don’t come cheap. In the case of Texas, the Brattle Group estimates that a capacity market would cost Texans an extra $3.2 billion a year….

Across the Atlantic, the calamity of renewable energy is becoming more visible each day. It will not be only good economists who see that imitating Europe would be a colossal blunder….

via Clean Energy’s Dirty Secrets | National Review Online.

German OFFshore BigWind humiliates their country

As BigWind eyes our sea shores, with particular focus off the New England coasts, we should learn from the mistakes of other countries. Germans now pay approximately 36 cents/kWh of energy. What do you, in America, pay? Look at your bill.  It is probably LESS than 9 cents. Thank you, Ohio legislators, for passing SB 310 which ‘freezes’ our mandates for this expensive energy. BigWind does NOT deserve our generous subsidies or tax breaks…

Germany’s flagship Bard 1 offshore wind farm has been described as “a faulty total system” as technical problems continue to plague the project, casting major doubts on the feasibility of large scale offshore projects.

The wind farm was officially turned on in August last year but was shut down again almost immediately due to technical difficulties that have still not been resolved – and now lawyers are getting involved.

The wind farm comprises 80 5MW turbines situated 100 km off the north German coastline. The difficulty facing engineers is how to get the electricity generated back to shore. So far, every attempt to turn on the turbines has resulted in overloaded and “gently smouldering” offshore converter stations.

Built at a cost of hundreds of millions and costing between €1 and €2 million a day to service, the project is estimated to have cost €340 million in lost power generation over the last year alone. And if the problems with the technology are deemed not to be the fault of the operator, German taxpayers will be on the hook for the running and repair costs, thanks to the German Energy Act 2012….

Germany already has amongst the highest energy bills in the world, not helped by the EU’s commitment to carbon reduction measures at the behest of an increasingly hysterical climate change industry, and the rest of Europe fares no better. British and European climate change policies already add an extra ten percent to British householders’ energy bills, at a time when fuel poverty affects one in four people….

However, with the Bild 1 turbines are already being tagged “white elephants in the North Sea” by sources such as the Economist, and with costs mounting and no end in sight, the question being asked, in Germany at least, is “Is the wind boom over before it even really began?”

via Flagship German Offshore Wind Farm Project Humiliated by Technical Faults.

What we should learn from the ‘wind’ers and losers in Germany

We should learn from the mistakes of other countries. Renewable energy can collapse their grid and create blackouts; there are more articles about this risk popping up all over the web. Additionally, BigWind is causing electricity rates to skyrocket. Are there real ‘winners and losers’ here? Looks like only ‘winders’ and ‘losers’….

Germany’s push toward renewable energy is causing so many drops and surges from wind and solar power that the government is paying more utilities than ever to help stabilize the country’s electricity grid.

Twenty power companies including Germany’s biggest utilities, EON SE and RWE AG, now get fees for pledging to add or cut electricity within seconds to keep the power system stable, double the number in September, according to data from the nation’s four grid operators. Utilities that sign up to the 800 million-euro $1.1 billion balancing market can be paid as much as 400 times wholesale electricity prices, the data show….

Lawmakers last month backed a revision of a the country’s clean-energy law to curb green subsidies and slow gains in consumer power prices that are the second-costliest in the European Union…

via German Utilities Bail Out Electric Grid at Wind’s Mercy – Businessweek.

When will BigWind destroy OUR grid, in the USA?

The realities listed, below, are inevitable. How will it affect YOU? Your place of business? Your hospital? The green lobbyists are hiding these truths from our legislators and, instead, focusing on the benefits for climate change (zero proof of this benefit). In a previous blog, we have referred to the BigWind lobby group as ‘illusionists’ and that could not be more true here. As we add more INstability into our grid in the USA, we will eventually see the problems discussed below…

Most supporters of renewable energy development are probably pretty comfortable with the way things are going.  Wind and Solar generation has been increasing both in “nameplate capacity” and in actual production of electricity.  There have not been any significant grid failures that can be blamed on renewables.  Apart from a consolidation within the solar cell manufacturing sector there have not been any notable bankruptcies within the electricity generating sector.  All visible signs are positive for a continued expansion of renewable resources….

But a new day is dawning in the U.S. and it could be a darn cold (or hot) one.

The EPA announced regulations in December 2011 that will require coal-fired thermal generation plants to clean up or shut down.  The reality is that for many of these plants it will not be feasible to clean them up.  In fact, in some cases the EPA will not even allow them to be updated with modern pollution controls.  As a result more than 40 GW of firm generation capacity will be decommissioned over the next several years.

Plans to replace this loss are in some cases vague and have been changing often.  Increased conservation and better utilization of existing plants are frequently included in Integrated Resource Plans.  In other cases greater reliance upon renewables is explicitly identified.  These are not really replacements for firm capacity.

A number of new Natural Gas fired plants are also under construction.  While current low gas prices make this an attractive option the threat of future significant price hikes as well as the EPA’s stated goal to regulate CO2 emissions are worrisome and are impacting the ability to secure financing of these plants in some cases.

As more and more coal-fired plants are retired it is likely that total system firm generation capacity will drop resulting in smaller reserves.  This, in turn, will make the system more susceptible to storms or other unplanned outages.

The degree to which grid security is compromised will vary from region to region depending upon the penetration of renewables, number of coal-fired plant retirements and the health of the local economy which has a major impact on electricity demand.  Based upon those factors I believe Texas and the Mid-west are the areas most at risk.

It may be that the reduction in coal-fired generation will do nothing more than cull excess capacity out of the system with no negative impacts.  But groups such as the Institution of Engineering and Technology in the UK have issued warnings about the progressive stress on a system that has taken decades to evolve and is now faced with unprecedented challenges.

Like the concrete block in the Youtube video the system is not displaying any outward signs of weakness.  The question is this – will the North American electricity system encounter its own version of second 2:41?

Why Renewables Havent Destroyed the Grid – Yet! – Pennenergy.

Germany’s BIGwind FAIL: A lesson for the USA

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How often do we hear that other countries are doing well with their BigWind experiments? The reality is very different. Below, you will read about Germany’s disaster. Educate yourselves, your neighbors, and share with your legislators! Our US Senators, last week, verballly agreed to extend the “wind production tax credit” at an estimated cost of $12B ANNUALLY. They obviously do not know the truths below! Additionally, we have added a new ‘tab’ on our website titled, International Failures. Other countries failures with BigWind will be included here for your education….

GERMANY’S GREEN ENERGY DISASTER
Green Energy Programs Are Forcing German Families Into Energy Poverty

WASHINGTON – The Institute for Energy Research today released the first entry in a new series of case studies on Europe’s green energy programs. For years, some policymakers have pointed to Europe as an exemplar of good energy policy, arguing that the U.S. should subsidize renewables through programs like the wind production tax credit or green energy mandates. Now that Europe’s green energy policies have been in place for years, IER decided to see how they were working.

The first case study focuses on Germany’s energy policies and finds that these policies are driving up energy prices and forcing hundreds of thousands of people into energy poverty. Specifically, the study found:

As many as 800,000 Germans have had their power cut off because of an inability to pay for rising energy costs.
Germany’s feed-in tariff scheme provides lavish subsidies to renewable energy producers.
On-shore wind has required feed-in tariffs that are in excess of 300 percent higher than market prices.
Germany’s Renewable Energy Levy, which subsidizes renewable energy production, cost German households €7.2 billion ($9.6 billion) in 2013.
The cost to expand transmission networks to integrate renewables stands at $33.6 billion, which grid operators say accounts “for only a fraction of the cost of the energy transition.”

To read IER’s full case study on Germany, click here: 

http://www.instituteforenergyresearch.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/German-Green-Energy-Study.pdf