List of BigWind REJECTIONS all over the USA. Need help? Look here!

Screen Shot 2016-07-21 at 9.19.09 AM

Do you wonder what other states are doing to fight BigWind? It is a growing list of actions that have been taken to protect individuals and communities. Please click the link, below and view the spreadsheet and see if there has been an action that could help you!!!

An interesting addition to our post from 2 days ago…we posted a video of a noisy turbine that is affecting a household in Van Wert, Ohio.  Iberdrola developed this industrial wind site LESS than 6 years ago and we have repeatedly blogged about developers SELLING their sites BEFORE the 10 year mark, due to maintenance issues and the end of the PTC $ at the 10 year mark.  Iberdrola has LEFT THE VAN WERT AREA and sold/merged the project! This household has been UNable to get through the telephone line of the ‘new’ BigWind company that is ‘supposed’ to be operating the site!!! Don’t let this happen to your neighborhood!!!

 

Advertisements

Think the Van Wert, Ohio turbines are without problems? Watch this!!

Is this just the beginning? As wind sites age, noise and maintenance issues rise. Some developers will then sell their site, prior to the 10 year mark, which is when their federal handout ends…the production tax credit.  This has already happened to 1 site in NW Ohio. Is the Blue Creek site, owned by Iberdrola, next to sell?  Please educate yourselves and your legislators….

 

Van Wert county commissioner opinion of BigWind

A Van Wert county commissioner opinion about the new potential for a 35,000 Apex project. He compares this to living next to a hog farm…which no one wants to do. If you have heard that communities are torn apart by the wind industry, he hints at that reality in Van Wert. What will happen if the Apex Long Prairie Project moves forward? It looks like the one commissioner wants to leave this decision up to the people who will reside amongst it. Read a lot of common sense in this article…

Wanna start an argument? Go to almost any random group of people in Van Wert County and state your opinion about windmills. Chances are, you will quickly find someone with whom to disagree…

But, if you are going to build something on your property, you are subject to a tax assessment. Real property taxes are assessed on all land, buildings and structures. If a property owner would choose to build a windmill, they would be taxed on its full value.

The question then is should a wind farm receive a tax break? The pro crowd argues that, yes, most definitely, this is economic development and a tax break should be automatic. The current wind farm is taxed pursuant to a Payment In Lieu of Taxes (PILOT) wherein the schools, county, townships, and other agencies receive a fixed payment instead of the windmills being normally assessed. This results in about a 70-80 percent reduction in tax payments.

A few years ago, before the state changed the setbacks and after several conferences with our township trustees, the Ohio Power Siting Board and Iberdrola, we determined that the PILOT eliminated our ability to negotiate with wind companies and was not in our county’s best interest. We revoked the Alternative Energy Zone designation for our county that had allowed the Blue Creek Wind Farm to be taxed under the PILOT.

Should the setbacks be returned to a manageable distance for Apex or Iberdrola to build a farm, this is the issue we would present to voters. We would ask the affected townships and the wind company to negotiate a tax scheme that has a chance to be approved and then submit it for an up or down vote.

A concern becomes who gets to vote on this issue? It does not seem appropriate that areas that stand only to benefit from a taxing scheme be allowed to vote to burden another area. For example, if a mega hog farm would want to locate on the outskirts of Convoy and the tax benefits would accrue to every other part of the county, what might be the result in Middle Point of that vote? Or if the roles were reversed, what might be the result in Convoy?

Van Wert City Schools would receive a significant monetary benefit if turbines were located in Liberty Township. But it is the residents of Liberty Township who would be burdened by the presence of the windmills and it would be that township’s tax revenues that are affected by a reduction in the amounts paid by windmill owners. I don’t know a definition of fair that would allow Van Wert City voters, an overwhelming majority of the school district, to determine this issue for Liberty Township….

Personally, I think I’ve been clear on my position in the past. I think windmills are horrible federal policy but as long as the federal government is intent on bankrupting our next generation, I wouldn’t object to see some of that money get wasted locally.

If you are in the pro crowd, I would advise against trying to pressure us to force windmills on a population that, as of now, does not want them. That has been the tactic of the wind companies for the last few years and it continues to have a zero chance of success. Replace lecturing with negotiation – the antis are well aware of the reasons to build these things and are not convinced. Perhaps you can pay their electric bills to win some support….

 

How Big will the turbines be, planted next to you, in Ohio? Bigger than you think…

 

No sooner had we written about the prospects for the Clean Power Plan, Justice Scalia died and now there is much speculation about his successor and whether the U.S. Senate will hold hearings on any nomination that might be made by President Obama. We cannot speculate on what will happen but thought you should know the constitutionality of the Clean Power Plan hangs in the balance. In some states, including Michigan and Wisconsin, the Governor has ordered that no further work on the CPP be undertaken while in Kansas and Missouri, the legislatures are working to halt activity. Ohio waits to hear what happens next.

In advance of a major Wind Operations and Maintenance conference coming up in Texas, a report has been issued reviewing issues that are arising as the fleet of wind turbines deployed across America age. The numbers are sobering and should give any community thinking about approving a wind facility second thought. Principal findings include:

• Bearing failure/ repair & maintenance focus set to double by 2017

• Original Equipment Manufacturers could lose 15% share of the O&M market by 2020

• Condition Monitoring Systems & Analytics investment to increase 1/3 by 2017

• Optimization of power generation, not cost cutting the real driver of investment (63/37%)

This means among other things, the noise from turbines is going to get a lot louder as the turbines age and are in need of gearbox repair. Also, repowering existing turbines with longer blades will increase. Moreover, those turbines that cannot be viably repowered will be decommissioned (or left to rust in the fields). Finding Q13 “What is the single biggest focus for you over the next 12 months?” was decommissioning.

What does “optimization of power generation” mean? It means taller turbines and longer blades and it should mean longer setbacks. We think the giants are coming to Ohio. The FAA reviews all potential structures that exceed 200 feet in height for possible air traffic obstruction. Recently, they have reviewed a wind development planned for Bellevue for turbines listed at 660 feet! Bellevue straddles Erie, Huron and Sandusky Counties. We include an article about this sort of monster below with a link to the monster movie showing its construction.

Going back to the Operations and Maintenance issues, our colleague, Tom Stacy, advises us to think about them in the context of annually increasing renewable energy mandates. Tom says, “Consider the implications of annually ratcheting energy market share mandates with a total schedule term longer than the lifespans of wind turbines. The deployment rate must increase markedly in later years of the program when new turbines are required to meet both replacement of old machines as well to meet annual benchmarks. And all this to produce randomly timed energy without firm capacity – dictating redundant infrastructure that includes necessarily underutilized conventional power plant assets. “

With respect to the setbacks defined in law, the notion of having the minimum be defined as a formula like 3xtower height plus blade length would be more desirable than a fixed number like 1,250 feet from a property line. In the case of the 660’ turbines, the minimum would then be 1,980’. That is a significant difference.

If you haven’t read the blog from, yesterday, please see that Kevon Martis, Director of Interstate Informed Citizens Coalition, has teamed up with Senator Seitz to challenge those who would seek to override the property line setback law through HB 190. They coined the phrase “trespass zoning” and have written a terrific opinion piece for the Ohio media. They conclude by saying: “Good neighbors don’t trespass. If Big Wind wants to be a good neighbor in rural Ohio, it needs to abandon its demand for trespass zoning.” The Lima News has printed the article and we hope the papers in Van Wert, Bellefontaine, Urbana and Springfield follow suit. We believe it was distributed to all of them.

Notwithstanding all of the above, on February 18th, Trishe Wind filed an Amendment to the next phase of the Blue Creek project in Paulding County proposing larger turbines and seeking to be considered under old rules that measure setbacks from homes even though Amendments to previously approved projects are supposed to be subject to the revised setbacks.  Looks like that ole “optimization of power generation”! Attention! Trespass Zoning coming to Paulding County…again!

  Enercon E126 – The Most Powerful Wind Turbine in the World

 

 

This video shows why Ohio needs significant turbine setbacks!

It is absolutely ludicrous that BigWind should be allowed to bully our legislators into shrinking our turbine setbacks (House Bill 483), as Apex/Everpower/Iberdrola are rumored to be doing. The setback is, currently, only 1250 feet from a property line. Watch this turbine fall, and you would wish that length to be significantly FARTHER! Turbines are only getting taller and blades only getting longer, yet the setbacks remain the same. Add some wind to this fire and catastropic damage could ensue to structures and property, fields and woods nearby…

https://www.facebook.com/AgricultureTechnologies/videos/1305115356180828/

 

Source: (1) Renewables Versus Fossil Fuels Facts and Myths

How much do turbines benefit (or hurt) Ohio schools?

How are the Ohio school turbines performing? Finally, we hear ‘some’ truth. First, USV was a disaster with and $800,000 liability created by the UNDERperforming turbine on their property. Their new superintendent saw the truth- the turbine produces too little energy and the energy is too expensive. He chose to switch to a traditional energy provider.  Second, is the Ada school district, where the cost to savings ratio is a “wash”. It is only a wash b/c the turbine was paid for by our taxdollars through a grant. It would be a loss, otherwise. At what point will their superintendent see that the maintenance costs outweigh the benfits? Finally, we take a look at Lincolnview schools. Their situation is entirely different that the previous 2 schools, because Lincolnview sits in the county within an industrial turbine site.  Taxpayer dollars, from all of us that live OUTside that district, and our state, have funded this project. Each industrial wind site costs us, the taxpayer, hundreds of millions of $ to build. Then, we pay them to produce power through the wind production tax credit. No other energy producer is given this gift. Mr. Snyder must be thankful that ‘we get the value off the turbine itself , not how much power they generate’ because the facts paint a dismal picture for NW Ohio wind energy. According to a federal site, the NW Ohio industrial wind sites produce LESS than 30% of the power that they are capable of producing. How many industries do you know that can survive by only producing 30% of what they told the public? None, unless the government supports you!  Finally, Mr. Snyder mentions what a great benefit it is for OSU to have purchased this wind energy and that it supports 20% of their energy usage. Baloney! That is just a lie. OSU purchased this energy because they wanted to ‘appear’ green to their students and they were probably given a tax credit or break from some grant. They could surely purchase energy from another supplier, cheaper, just like USV schools…

Superintendent Rector had quite the challenge when he first began.
“We had less than seven days cash remaining in our budgets,”…In a very short period of time he cleared out an $800,000 liability owed to the state from the former wind academy...
Rector spoke of the wind farm and academy which he believes led to large fallout in the community.
“Everybody did things with the best of intentions but it really tore at the heart of this community.”…
As for the two windmills on the school property, the negotiated price for their generated power costs more than what they can get directly from the local utility company. So far they have saved over one hundred thousand dollars by switching to a commercial provider.
“And money saved, is money made,” he stated as he looks toward a better future. “What is done is done. They’re not going anywhere. Will they eventually see a savings? That would be nice. By the same token we’ve been able to, through negotiation, bring costs down.”
Ada School districts acquired a windmill on their property during the same period taking advantage of grant funding during the alternative energy incentive program. Ada Superintendent Suzanne Darmer believes the cost to savings ratio comes out as a wash and everything is working fine.
“That was a onetime opportunity many years ago,” Darmer said. “When that came into place we had the opportunity to secure a grant through the federal government through the NexGen Company.”
Darmer further added, “It has not been a problem for us. We have regular maintenance, but nothing to speak of about them being down.”
The wind turbine is not an issue at the school, however, they do not have any plans to put in any more….
“I’d like to see enough windmills in Hardin County so that it’s giving back to the school districts.” said Superintendent Jeff Snyder at Lincolnview.
The Lincolnview school district has reaped the benefit of a $400,000 annual payment from the 42 windmills located there. Snyder said the program was developed from federal legislation and tax incentives for alternative energy and brokered by the Van Wert county commissioners. The county commissioners worked out the deal with the wind energy company, Iberdrola Renewable, a Spanish public multinational electric utility company. The company pays the school and the county directly.
“We get value off the turbine itself, not how much they generate,” Snyder said. “We don’t get any energy to run our school districts off our turbine. The turbine is putting power onto the grid for us to consume. What they try to do is to get people to buy into their energy in advance.”
Snyder says the Ohio State University (OSU) has already seen a tremendous savings with the locked in rate from their windfarm. He stated, “Twenty percent of all the power OSU uses is coming from this wind farm. They locked in their rate for the next twenty years.”
Snyder says the revenues generated from the windfarm greatly benefits the school and saves the taxpayers. Lincolnview received a mere $81,000 in funding from the state this year, which, by the way, won’t even pay for a school bus….
“We’re one of the first school districts to provide laptop devices to every student from kindergarten through 12,” he added, “We’ve started pre-engineering and bio-medical programs in high school, knowing we have this money for the next twenty years. It’s been a world of difference for our school district and we’re going to keep doing great things here because we have the opportunity to do that.”

Source: Ada Herald

BigWind doesn’t need a Christmas present!!

Screen Shot 2015-12-10 at 8.28.20 AM

This takes very little of your time to send a message to Congress. Please do not miss this opportunity to give them a piece of your mind…

Congress is once again working on a tax extenders plan that includes a multi-year extension of the wind Production Tax Credit (PTC).

This tax credit, which expired last year, is a massive handout to large corporations to build and operate industrial wind facilities.

But you can help stop it by contacting your Republican leadership today!

The subsidy is so large that a two-year extension alone could transfer $10 billion over the next decade from taxpayers to the companies who get the credit.

And many of the largest PTC recipients are foreign-owned energy conglomerates that have grown accustomed to handouts.

With subsidies drying up abroad, they’re turning to U.S. taxpayers to keep the spigot open.

Should Congress move forward with this deal, it will come as an early Christmas present to large, multinational corporations like GE at the expense of taxpayers everywhere.

This is why we must act now to stop Congress from extending this costly taxpayer-funded subsidy for the wind industry.

And you can take action right now by sending an email to your Republican leadership today! (click the link below)

Together, we will make it clear to our elected officials in Congress that they either stand on principle, and with the American people, or with industrial wind lobbyists and President Obama.

Thank you for your support!

Sincerely,

Tom Pyle
President of the American Energy Alliance

Source: Stand Against Corporate Welfare