BigWind tries to ‘huff and puff’ Ohio House down

As the Senate Energy and Public Utilities Committee gears up for its first hearing on HB 6, the opposition is flooding the print media with articles and opinion pieces that argue against the provisions of the bill, advocate for closing the nuclear plants and reducing wind turbine setbacks.   An assortment of articles is provided below. 

In a disgusting turn of events, the Icebreaker Wind developer, LEEDCo, is asking senators for a portion of the funding that would be made available through HB 6.  Democrats have proposed numerous changes to HB 6 including an Icebreaker subsidy.  Recall that Icebreaker is a pilot project designed as a test to see if putting 1,500 wind turbines in Lake Erie is feasible.   They don’t seem to care that it would be in the middle of the world’s third most important migratory flyway.  Senator Sandra Williams was quoted as saying LEEDCo  wants an earmark of 10₵ for every dollar raised in the Clean Air Program.  They are shameless enough to not even pretend that their subsidy would be based on the amount of power they produce.

“LEEDCo leadership is meeting with senators to discuss the importance of Ohio being the first location in North America to build a freshwater offshore wind facility,” spokeswoman Nancy Lesic said. “Our goal is for leadership in Columbus to recognize the economic significance of this project and provide the necessary support to allow us to access federal and international investments.”

One definition of being “green” is to pursue policies and actions that claim reduced, minimal, or no harm upon ecosystems or the environment.  Being green means having the smallest ecological footprint.  This is achieved in energy generation by utilizing resources that have energy density.  Generation sources that are not dense are called “dilute” .  Wind and solar are dilute.   Jim Feasel does a density calculation and determines that 33.65 of Ohio’s 88 counties would be covered with 600 foot tall turbines (9.99 million acres) if you replaced current generation with wind.  That is not GREEN.

Elsewhere, 

  • We also encourage you to read Michael Shellenberger’s article on solar energy called, If Solar Panels Are So Clean, Why Do They Produce So Much Toxic Waste?   It is reported, “The fact that cadmium can be washed out of solar modules by rainwater is increasingly a concern for local environmentalists like the Concerned Citizens of Fawn Lake in Virginia, where a 6,350 acre solar farm to partly power Microsoft data centers is being proposed.
  • “We estimate there are 100,000 pounds of cadmium contained in the 1.8 million panels,” Sean Fogarty of the group told me. “Leaching from broken panels damaged during natural events — hail storms, tornadoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, etc. — and at decommissioning is a big concern.”  There is real-world precedent for this concern. A tornado in 2015 broke 200,000 solar modules at southern California solar farm Desert Sunlight.
  • How ironic that just as the dirty truth about solar panels is being exposed, the Governor Michigan in a moment of true lunacy, removed conservation protections on more than 3 million acres of Michigan farmland, opening up previously protected land to commercial solar development. The Governor says the land must be returned to a state allowing for agriculture production after solar panels are removed.  “This administrative decision will not result in a loss of usable farmland,” McDowell said. “The change ensures that Michigan’s farmland is preserved so we can continue to feed our communities while also balancing the need to develop renewable energy sources.”   Would you like a little cadmium with your corn?  Reminds us of the lead in the drinking water.
  • A lady from suburban Cincinnati writes an Opinion piece about wanting to come home to Ohio to build wind turbines.  Kim Smith is vice president of Engineering & Construction for ACCIONA.  “As the Ohio Senate considers this energy policy proposal, my hope is that they’ll to listen to local county officials who are hoping for the added revenue that utility scale renewable energy projects can deliver, and that they hear the landowners who have already reached agreements with developers to bring projects to their land.”  This opinion piece definitely deserves some comments!  Ask her what Acciona’s position is on local zoning or a township referendum.
  • Governor Strickland wins the Pelosi-Schumer Award for excessive whining about HB 6.  It was Strickland who took our right to zoning away and gave uncompensated easements over our land to wind developers.  Hey, Governor Strickland remember the one about pigs get fed and hogs get slaughtered?
  • The US Department of Energy officials attended a conference this week in Salt Lake City where they said they are committed to making fossil fuels cleaner rather than imposing “draconian” regulations on coal and oil.  Secretary Rick Perry previously said the administration wants to spend $500 million next year on fossil fuel research and development as demand plummets for coal and surges for natural gas.  “Instead of punishing fuels that produce emissions through regulation, we’re seeking to reduce those emissions by innovation,” Perry said at the conference.   DOE believes the US economy will continue to run on baseload power provided by coal, gas and nuclear energy.
  • Consulting firm Wood Mackenzie reported that “well over half of the $15bn the onshore wind industry will spend on operations and maintenance (O&M) this year will go to unforeseen repairs and correctives caused by component failures. Unplanned failures are currently costing as much as $30,000 per turbine each year for repairs and spare parts, as well as leading to an average seven hours of lost production per machine – not including downtime for pre-emptive shutdowns or long delivery-times for materials, equipment and technician call-outs, all totting up to a total $8.5bn a year.”
  • G.E. is having a hard time with tower collapse.  Two went down in separate incidents which were said to be isolated events.  BUT! Any third turbine collapse involving a GE machine in quick succession should set alarm bells ringing at the manufacturer, given the rarity of such incidents globally, said a leading insurer of renewable energy projects.  Fraser McLachlan, CEO of specialist insurer GCube, said the two collapses so far this year of GE turbines at US wind farms is already enough to give pause for thought.

https://deref-mail.com/mail/client/Keku1CJEOlk/dereferrer/?redirectUrl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.dispatch.com%2Fopinion%2F20190609%2Fletter-city-dwellers-wouldnt-tolerate-wind-turbines

http://www.sanduskyregister.com/story/201906060037

https://www.ohio.com/opinion/20190608/beacon-journalohiocom-editorial-board-state-sen-wilsons-nuclear-option

https://deref-mail.com/mail/client/Kl4joOY_Zgo/dereferrer/?redirectUrl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.vindy.com%2Fnews%2F2019%2Fjun%2F10%2Fohio-energy-bill-becomes-prize-for-speci%2F

https://www.cincinnati.com/story/opinion/2019/06/10/opinion-closing-door-renewable-energy-bad-news-rural-ohio/1327550001/

https://deref-mail.com/mail/client/S5AoDIB6OBk/dereferrer/?redirectUrl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.toledoblade.com%2Flocal%2Fenvironment%2F2019%2F06%2F09%2Fformer-governor-ted-strickland-frustrated-to-see-ohio-dumping-renewable-energy-goals%2Fstories%2F20190606150

https://deref-mail.com/mail/client/evhllDisNVw/dereferrer/?redirectUrl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.eenews.net%2Fenergywire%2F2019%2F06%2F04%2Fstories%2F1060472835

https://deref-mail.com/mail/client/nntzNvnJvoE/dereferrer/?redirectUrl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.forbes.com%2Fsites%2Fmichaelshellenberger%2F2018%2F05%2F23%2Fif-solar-panels-are-so-clean-why-do-they-produce-so-much-toxic-waste%2F%23d490f8d121cc

https://deref-mail.com/mail/client/mfOgYgXCAcQ/dereferrer/?redirectUrl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.power-eng.com%2Farticles%2F2019%2F05%2Fdoe-making-fossil-fuels-cleaner-better-than-penalizing-coal-oil.html%3Fcmpid%3D%26utm_source%3Denl%26utm_medium%3Demail%26utm_campaign%3Dpower_engineering_e-newsletter%26utm_content%3D2019-06-04%26eid%3D326852857%26bid%3D2458527

Third GE wind turbine collapse would be sign something’s wrong’: insurer

CEO of insurance specialist points to relative rarity of collapses as US wind group continues probe

By Andrew Lee  03 June 2019 Recharge

RECHARGE

US wind turbine collapses ‘not linked’, says GE

Incidents ‘separate and isolated’ says OEM as latest academic research flags complex factors at play

by Andrew Lee 31 May 2019Updated 03 June 2019

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Thumbs Down to Ohio BigWind Alternative Energy Zone

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A great victory was achieved this week for the warriors of Seneca County when two of the three County Commissioners voted to repeal the county’s designation as an Alternative Energy Zone.  Seneca County now joins Van Wert as a county which has repealed their designation.  Remaining AEZ counties include Sandusky, Delaware, Franklin, Putnam, Paulding, Hardin, Clinton, Noble and Summit.  Recently, requests to approve individual PILOT requests were turned down in Logan, Huron and Erie Counties.  Had these counties been designated AEZ, tax abatement and PILOT payments would have been automatically granted. 

Dale Arnold and the traveling Farm Bureau circus made an appearance in Urbana this week to tout the latest “ag commodity” – solar energy.  Harvest away.  We are still waiting to farm coal and gas, maybe raise a little nuclear. Among the points reported to us by attendees were that many of Ohio’s 33 solar companies have left the state because permitting is difficult; solar projects under 50 MW are subject to local zoning;  10 solar projects are in the OPSB pipeline; and permitting can take between 36 and 48 months.

PILOT is apparently important to solar developers.  According to a summary report written in 2010 by the law firm of Bricker & Eckler, PILOT “significantly reduced the state tax burden on renewable and advanced sources of energy generation, such as solar, wind, co-generation, and clean coal. Under the old laws, taxes on solar and wind were estimated to be approximately $115,000 and $40,000 per megawatt (MW), respectively – rendering Ohio a less competitive marketplace for deployment of these technologies.” Current PILOT law reduces the tax burden on qualifying projects to $6,000 to $9,000 for wind and $7,000 per MW for solar.

At the very bottom of this issue of Wind News is a very readable publication by Mark Mills of the Manhattan Institute.  We think it will make you laugh out loud as Mills explains the physics of energy and shows why there is no possibility that the world is undergoing— or can undergo—a near-term transition to a “new energy economy.” Mills takes on wind, solar and battery storage.   One example: “The annual output of Tesla’s Gigafactory, the world’s largest battery factory, could store three minutes’ worth of annual U.S. electricity demand. It would require 1,000 years of production to make enough batteries for two days’ worth of U.S. electricity demand.”  The US routinely maintains two months of stored energy to meet demand in the event of emergency.  You do the math.

An interesting bill was introduced recently.  HB 126 would bar an action challenging an act for violation of the one-subject rule if it is commenced later than 275 days after the act’s effective date.  This has applicability to the lawsuit filed in Paulding County by wind leaseholders and AWEA against the state which alleges current setbacks violate the Ohio Constitution because they were included in a budget bill in 2014.  HB 126 would forbid a lawsuit like the one filed in Paulding County unless it was filed 275 after it was enacted.   Rep. Seitz is a co-sponsor of this bill.

 

In this week’s news:

 

  • The Icebreaker Wind project in Lake Erie received important approvals from the Ohio EPA and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers issued a permit to commence construction.  We wonder if these turbines will be granted PILOT and, if so, what entity would have the authority to grant it?

 

  • The General Assembly is getting closer to the introduction of legislation to promote low and no carbon energy generation.  Rep. Jamie Callender, who chairs the House Public Utilities Committee, is leading the effort and says, “We’re looking at promoting lower emissions not just with nuclear but also solar and wind and also with other types of generation here in Ohio,” he continued. “How can they take what they’re doing and move it to be clean? We’re being very cautious to the extent we cannot play favorites but come up with a global solution that helps everyone move toward lower carbon emissions.”  Callender is a self-proclaimed fan of renewables. He expects legislation to be introduced in early April, possibly as early as this week.

 

  • Kevon Martis swats back at Rep. Casey Weinstein’s comments reported last week about wind turbine setbacks not being a matter of safety concern in that all generation carries risk.  “Any risk of wind turbine failure must be added to the risks of gas extraction, transportation and power generation because wind generation is wholly dependent upon the gas resource. It is not a replacement for those resources. Thus your colleague’s comparison collapses.”

 

  • North Carolina could permanently ban big wind-power projects from the most energy-intensive parts of the state’s Atlantic coast, but a state senator said Wednesday the move is necessary to prevent hindering military training flights.  Legislation introduced by Republican Sen. Harry Brown would prohibit building, expanding or operating sky-scraping wind turbines within about 100 miles from the coast. The bill would apply to the area that stretches from the Virginia border to south of the Camp Lejeune Marine Corps base.

 

  • In Ohio, the General Assembly has ignored and avoided the issue of wind turbine interference with military training routes but perhaps that could come to an end.  An assessment of the Seneca Wind project states “Considering the low altitudes associated with these routes, it is possible that wind development could have an impact on military operations. It is possible that these routes are used frequently by aircraft from Mansfield Lahm Air National Guard Base and other nearby units. If this is the case, the originating activity of these routes may object to proposed wind development within the route boundaries. The units may also object to any wind development over 499 feet AGL due to the likely increase to the minimum cloud ceilings required to fly the routes.”  This study and its concerns should be of importance to any community near a military airfield including Wright-Patt.  The study is attached.

 

  • Another great article on the renewables scam focuses on Georgetown, Texas – part of the 100% renewable gang.  “Like other places said to be 100-percent reliant on “renewable energy,” Georgetown doesn’t actually have its own wind turbines, solar panels, and biomass resources powering it. It simply pays an upcharge for electricity that is said to come from renewable sources. If the green communities and businesses actually did use all renewables, it would likely be very easy to tell: On calm nights the lights would go out. A very few locales in the nation might have the geological features necessary to keep the lights on when renewables fade — such as hills and water that allow a sizeable hydroelectric dam — but most don’t.”   Of course, the 100-percenters have figured out a slick way to get around these physics truths: They pretend.   The 100-percent renewables scam is being sold to us by the government, the utility companies, and the towns and businesses that participate. The “scam” buys goodwill with the duped public and is not only good public relations, it’s also an easy route for them. But as with most governmental interference in the free market, the public ends up taking it in the pocketbook.

 

  • The scammers and pretenders are forming a trade association.  Imagine that.  Companies from a variety of industries — including Walmart, General Motors, Google and Johnson & Johnson — are forming a trade association to represent firms that purchase renewable energy and remove barriers that make it complicated to shift away from carbon.  The new organization, the Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance, is building on years of work between corporations and climate advocacy nonprofits. Currently, about 200 companies, cities and universities are involved. Miranda Ballentine, the CEO of the new trade group, says the organization will help push energy markets and public policies to make it easier to actually choose to buy green energy.   This story from National Public Radio actually states: Many companies have set green energy targets as part of overall sustainability efforts — whether out of a sense of corporate responsibility or in the pursuit of positive PR.    And don’t forget the blackmail/extortion from those “climate advocacy nonprofits”!

 

  • The US DOE is about to waste some more taxpayer dollars to advance offshore, distributed and ‘tall’ wind across the lower-50 states. DOE is looking at supporting 140 meter towers.  That is a 459’ tower before measuring the blade.

 

  • The Grain Belt Express appears to be moving forward again under the management of its new owner, Invenergy.

It continues to be an active climate, in Ohio, filled with ‘constant change’…..

Seneca County commissioners voted 2-1 Thursday to “sunset” the alternative energy zone put in place in 2011 by a previous board. The AEZ will end June 30….

Phasing out the AEZ in about three months does not affect the Seneca Wind or Republic Wind proposed projects, but would mean the AEZ is not automatically in place for companies that might propose new wind projects after June 30…

Commissioner Mike Kerschner changed his vote since the November vote was taken.

“The fact is that if we rescind it we then have the power within this group of negotiation,” Kerschner said. “It puts a lot more power on this group.”

He said Erie and Huron counties also have rescinded their AEZ programs…

Chris Aichholz, spokesman for the local anti-wind organization, said “We consider today’s decision by the commissioners to rescind the alternative energy zone another achievement. These types of successes only come as a result of our tireless efforts to educate the community on the industrial wind turbine projects being proposed for our county.”

He said the group has been asking for the AEZ to be rescinded for almost a year.

Original article

About Ohio nuclear

Tuesday, March 26, 2019

First Energy Solutions to Lawmakers: Time Running Out to Save Nuclear Plants

Kevon Martis

North Carolina

The Renewable Energy Scam

Walmart,GM,Google want more renewables.

Recharge

US opens wallet to offshore, rural and ‘tall’ wind

Department of Energy earmarks $28m with eye on ‘significant opportunities’ for cost reductions

By Darius Snieckus

28 March 2019

Corporations promise more renewables

No timeline for $2.3bn US Midwest wind link despite state OK

Invenergy says still ‘premature’ to look at construction schedule for 4GW Grain Belt Express after regulatory boost

By Richard Kessler in Fort Worth

26 March 2019

Mark Mills of Manhattan Institute **********

 

Has BigWind become a BULLY in Ohio?

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This week the Senate announced the members who will be serving on the Senate Energy and Public Utilities Committee. Senator Steve Wilson (R-Maineville) has been appointed Chairman.  Wilson is a former bank CEO and member of the Board of the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.  Vice Chair will be Sen. Rob McColley of Napoleon in Henry County who is an attorney. Senator Sandra Williams (D-Cleveland)  is the ranking member.  Filling out the Committee are Republicans Brenner (R-Powell); Burke (R-Marysville); Dolan (R- Chagrin Falls); Eklund (R-Chardon); Hoaglund (R-Adena); M. Huffman (R-Lima); Peterson (R-Sabina); Rulli (R-Salem); Craig (D-Columbus) and O’Brien (D-Bazetta).

Several interesting issues have arisen in various forums this week.   A spokesperson for Innogy announced that they would be backing up wind developments onsite with batteries the size of semi-truck containers.  They propose to stack five of them one on top of the other to provide 5MW of back-up power to smooth out variable winds.  But their spokesperson claimed there would be no need to involve the OPSB because they would not meet the over 5MW for state regulation.  We fail to see how batteries installed at a wind facility would not be considered a part of the total project and therefore included in the total MW for the facility. And, how ‘green’ are batteries? We are told NOT to dispose of them in regular trash because of the risk of the acids.  What will they do with batteries the size of semis??

A question has arisen as to whether a tenant will be afforded adequate protection if a non-resident landowner/landlord signs a wind lease waiving setback restrictions.  Will the landlord be obligated to inform the tenant?  Does the landlord have a duty to ascertain whether the tenant family has any medical conditions? Does the tenant have any right to claims against the landowner if adverse impacts are experienced?  Setback waivers generally include agreements not to publicly complain about noise, shadow flicker and other nuisance effects.  Would the tenant be bound by such terms if they are not party to the agreement?

The Findlay Zoning Board of Appeals rejected an application for approval of two on-site wind turbines for an industrial facility.  The 400 foot turbines exceed Findlay’s height limits of 100’ for wind turbines. The existing turbines in the Findlay area at Ball and Whirlpool are in Allen Township which has no zoning.  The company seeking to erect the turbines was originally rejected by the Marion Township Zoning Board of Appeals. This led them to annex their 37-acre property into Findlay where they were met with another rejection.  The company may seek to overturn the decision in court.  Press reports indicate the turbines would be as close as 1000’ from neighboring residences.  In the Findlay, Ohio article, Jereme Kent of One Energy is quoted as saying, “We will have to evaluate our other legal recourses to resolve this”…I don’t know about you, but that sounds like a threat to those who were opposed to the turbines! City administrators assert there would be negative impacts on these properties. We hope the folks in Findlay are aware of what happened in Falmouth, MA.

The Ohio Conservative Energy Forum has gone into an over-spin condition with a new poll claiming widespread support for clean energy in Ohio.  (You might even call it a “mandate”. ☹)  The poll was conducted by Public Opinion Strategies in the D.C. area.  P.O.S. states on their website: “Public Opinion Strategies is one of the nation’s leading public opinion research firms specializing in political, public affairs, public policy, and corporate positioning research. Our roots are in political campaign management. As such, our research is focused on producing data that compels decisions – to get results.”  Gee – seems like they admit their polls are designed to get whatever result the client wants. In this case, the objective is reduced setbacks measured from homes.  How noble.  

There have been several media reports covering the poll but it is unclear whether any reporter has actually seen the questions that were asked.  It appears that the attached memo was carefully crafted to “appear” as though it is presenting the questions but it is not.   Our question is when did Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez join the Ohio Conservative Energy Forum?  Representatives of OCEF spent the week meeting with legislators to convince them they need to vote for renewables if they want to keep their elected office.  Meanwhile, newly elected Rep. Cross from Hardin County spoke to the Annual Indian Lake Chamber meeting and said that “quality of life is now Number 1 in attracting growth.”  Wonder if they took the survey?

A short video of an energy conversation with Bill Gates is worth watching: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d1EB1zsxW0k

PILOT payments for the solar field in Hardin County were the recent subject of discussion with the County Commissioners.  No resolution was reached and there continues to be much uncertainty surrounding the PILOT program.  “County Auditor Mike Bacon had questioned if taking the productive farmland off the property tax charts would result in an increase to other taxpayers to balance the loss.  Klooster said the issue has been a major concern of Invenergy, who doesn’t want the solar field development to not result in “a penny of increase to anyone’s taxes.”  A public hearing on Phase II of the solar farm will be held on March 14 in Hardin County.

In other news:

 

  • Hardin County’s Upper Scioto Valley schools want to get rid of two turbines on their property.  One of the turbines does not work and the cost of a needed part is $100,000, which NexGen is not willing to pay unless USV extends its contract for services.   “But the board and administration questioned why it would be interested in doing that since the amount they pay per kilowatt to NexGen is double the cost paid by the district on the commercial electric grid.  “It is cheaper for me to have them not working,” said Treasurer Stacy Gratz.”….How many schools across the state know this reality?

 

  • “American Electric Power (AEP) is paying $551m in cash to acquire full or partial interests in 724MW of US wind projects from Sempra Energy, continuing an aggressive drive to add capacity since the spectacular collapse last year of its 2GW Wind Catcher project. The deal, expected to close next quarter, includes Sempra’s 100% stake in the 100MW Apple Blossom wind project in Michigan and 78MW Black Oak Getty facility in Minnesota.  The remaining 546MW comprises projects that Sempra jointly owns with BP Wind Energy: Auwahi Wind in Hawaii, Ridge 2 Wind in Kansas, Mehoopany Wind in Pennsylvania, Cedar Creek 2 Wind in Colorado and Fowler Ridge 2 Wind in Indiana.”

 

  • Supporters and opponents of the Lake Erie Icebreaker project are sounding off about whether the benefits outweigh the risks of putting wind turbines in the lake. “Final approval could come soon for Icebreaker, a six-turbine wind installation in Lake Erie, eight miles off Cleveland’s shoreline. Lake Erie Foundation board member John Lipaj noted it’s actually a pilot project for a massive, 1,500 wind turbine installation throughout the lake. The developer has said each turbine holds about 400 gallons of industrial lubricants, and Lipaj said that’s just not worth the risk. “Lake Erie, which is the source of drinking water for 11 million people, isn’t the place to be building an industrial wind facility,” Lipaj said. “Build the wind turbines onshore; build them where farmers need that extra income. It just makes so much more sense and it’s better for the lake.”   The Ohio Power Siting Board could decide on the project at a hearing February 21.

 

  • The United States Senate has voted to approve a large measure protecting public lands.  One provision of the bill is a bird measure sponsored by Ohio Senator Rob Portman that will provide $6.5 million each year through 2024 on conservation. Portman said hundreds of bird species migrate through Ohio each year, making Lake Erie a popular bird watching destination. The Senate approved the bill in a 92 to 8 vote. The House of Representatives has not yet taken it up. “Protecting and conserving these bird populations is critically important and I am pleased the Senate approved this bipartisan legislation,” said a statement from Portman. “I’m looking forward to this legislation being signed very soon.”    It remains to be seen whether the OPSB will consider this federal legislation when deciding the Icebreaker project.

 

  • In Tippecanoe County, Indiana has decided that industrial wind development will no longer be allowed. “Wind turbines are not appropriate for our county,” said Julie Peretin. Speaking on behalf of several Tippecanoe County residents who share the same concern Peretin said,  “We are too densely populated and we have some of the best farm ground in the state.”   “Wind farms are a great economic opportunity for rural areas and areas with declining populations,” said Murtaugh.  “Our population is constantly growing, our economic development activities are escalating, to tie up that type of ground for up to 50 years is way premature,” said Murtaugh.  “A commercial developer who just kind of sweeps in, the potential to cause harm to a community cannot be understated,” she said.

 

  • The aggressive left-wing group “Checks & Balances” had a complete meltdown over the citizens in NW Ohio (aka “fossil fuel operatives”) who are effectively using social media to speak out against industrial wind.  You can read C&B’s incomprehensible screed at https://checksandbalancesproject.org/van-wert-wind-development/.  We find it interesting that they blame citizen groups, such as our own, for Apex pulling out of NW Ohio, yet Apex said NOTHING like this when they left.  Read the Apex article here
  • Why did Apex leave VW Ohio?

 

  • Google re-confirms its data center investment in New Albany as well as an opioid addiction program in Dayton.

 

  • An Illinois School Superintendent challenges Apex on a misleading marketing campaign concerning a wind development’s  “windfall” for local schools. “I feel the school district should only be taking a stance on any issue that has a direct impact on the schools. The other political issues people are having when it comes to the environmental impact, etc., I as Superintendent of the school district should not be making any statements on those issues. So we are absolutely neutral on this issues and we will just see how it plays out, but I just felt that I needed to clarify any perception people in the community might have that this would be viewed as a windfall for the school district,” says Ptacek.

 

  • The authors of a 2016 study found steeply diminishing returns when a lot of battery storage is added to the grid. They concluded that coupling battery storage with renewable plants is a “weak substitute” for large, flexible coal or natural-gas combined-cycle plants, the type that can be tapped at any time, run continuously, and vary output levels to meet shifting demand throughout the day.   Building the level of renewable generation and storage necessary to reach California’s goals would drive up costs exponentially, from $49 per megawatt-hour of generation at 50 percent to $1,612 at 100 percent. And that’s assuming lithium-ion batteries will cost roughly a third what they do now.  These forces would dramatically increase electricity costs for consumers.  “You have to pause and ask yourself: ‘Is there any way the public would stand for that?’”   The Ohio Conservative Energy Forum would say “YES!” 

 

Findlay vs OneEnergy

Polls

Yet another poll

Cleveland poll

Kenton questions $ behind renewable

AEP

Lake Erie questions arise

Indiana BAN on BigWind

Battery problems w renewables

USV school

 

 

Ohio Lake Erie fish NOT excited about potential BigWind addition

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Fish and Oil don’t mix. We find it incredibly sad that people are so incredibly misinformed about industrial wind energy. It is a large part of the ‘New Green Deal’. But, read below, and you learn that an industrial wind turbine is anything BUT clean.  400 gallons of industrial lubricants and 55 gallons of oil in EACH turbine. Think about that folks, the ‘New Green Deal’ can’t eliminate fossil fuels because BigWind NEEDS fossil fuels, inside their bellies, to function!!!!! Will the Ohio Power Siting Board see this? Probably not, their nickname, remember is the Say Yes to BigWind Board……

CLEVELAND, Ohio – The first freshwater wind-energy installation in North America could be coming to Ohio. While agreeing that a move to cleaner sources of energy is important, opponents say there’s not enough evidence that the benefits of the project outweigh the risks.

Final approval could come soon for Icebreaker, a six-turbine wind installation in Lake Erie, eight miles off Cleveland’s shoreline. Lake Erie Foundation board member John Lipaj noted it’s actually a pilot project for a massive, 1,500 wind turbine installation throughout the Great Lakes. The developer has said each turbine holds about 400 gallons of industrial lubricants and 55 gallons of oil, and Lipaj said that’s just not worth the risk.

“Lake Erie, which is the source of drinking water for 11 million people, isn’t the place to be building an industrial wind facility,” …

Cleveland article

It’s a ‘mad world’ (for BigWind right now)

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Mad dashes, mad men, mad money—its a mad world!! Loads and loads of news this week.  Important Ohio news is presented but the big picture news is a focus this week as well.  It is important to understand the big picture and context in which each local battle is being waged.  The upcoming elections at national, state and local levels will shape the future direction of energy development.  Left-wing environmentalists (mad men) have billions of dollars (mad money)  invested in the fight and many angry Ohioans are seeing the effects in their own backyards.   Developers are madly dashing to secure 100% funding from the Production Tax Credit (more mad money!) but as a back-up, they hope to retake the US House of Representatives and EXTEND the PTC for wind.  Stay informed!

Regional Economic Development Alliance Study Committee

Ohio Senate President Larry Obhof has appointed Senator Rob McColley (R-Napoleon) and State Senator Jay Hottinger (R-Newark) to the Regional Economic Development Alliance Study Committee.   The committee is charged with studying the features, benefits and challenges of establishing regional economic development alliances and partnerships between Ohio communities.   Senator McColley has worked hard to address the concerns of NW Ohio residents who face the threat of industrial wind development.    Senator Hottinger represents an area where one of Amazon’s data centers is located.  Amazon is seeking to power their data centers with renewable energy.

The study committee is composed of 17 members: three members of the Ohio Senate; three members of the Ohio House; the Governor or their designee; two representatives of academia; two economic development professionals; the chairperson of the Regional Prosperity Initiative or their designee; the president of the Ohio Association of Regional Councils or their designee; and three persons appointed by the Governor based on recommendations from an Ohio-based advocacy group, an Ohio-based foundation and a metropolitan planning organization.  The study committee is to complete a report for the Governor by August 1, 2019.

Update on Van Wert county blade failure

After several weeks have passed since the failure, Rep. Bill Seitz inquired about the status of the investigation and findings of the Ohio Power Siting Board relative to the incident.   It appears they knew nothing about it and the developer may not have reported it.   The OPSB is now alerted and promises to make a report to Rep. Seitz as soon as possible.

Seneca County Poll Confirms Public Rejection of Industrial Wind

A new poll of more than 1,000 Tiffin area residents found that 75.84% of Seneca County residents oppose the area’s proposed wind projects, while 21.67% support and approximately 2.5% said they’re unsure/don’t know how they feel on the issue.   The poll breaks down respondents by varies classifications and it is clearly not a partisan issue.   In the meantime, residents with Good Neighbor Agreements up for renewal claim the developer will not release them if they do not want to renew.  The developer claims the projects are “under construction”.    Seneca County folks who signed setback waivers (aka Good Neighbor Agreements) should remember that the OPSB was charged with establishing a rule for waivers but they never did.  Are the waivers enforceable?    Against this backdrop, the State of Ohio has announced Seneca Wind qualified to receive PILOT under the terms of the local AEZ….see article link below

“Fake” Conservatives for a Clean Energy Future honors Champions of Clean Energy

CCE  has applauded three Ohio lawmakers as “champions” of clean energy.  Sen. Matt Dolan, (R-Chagrin Falls), Rep. Rick Carfagna (R-Westerville), and Rep. Laura Lanese (R-Grove City) are among elected officials receiving the group’s praise. Jon Cross, Republican candidate for the 83rd House District, was also honored.  Mark Pischea, the group’s president, called each “vocal supporter(s) of conservative energy policy solutions that emphasize clean, renewable energy and energy waste reduction. It’s polices like these that spark true innovation, create jobs, protect ratepayers and grow the economy in states like Ohio.”    Given the Seneca County Poll maybe these elected officials should decline to accept the awards. Do YOU reside in any of their districts? Have you shared YOUR opinion with them??

Lake Erie Icebreaker Project Blasted by Boaters

Boating Associations of Ohio and the Michigan Boating Industry Association, along with environmental and fishing groups, are blitzing members of the Ohio Power Siting Board with petitions from hundreds of boaters in both states ahead of a closed meeting Monday, Sept. 24 in Columbus, Ohio.  The article below notes “More specifically to boating and fishing interests, the turbine installations are expected to trigger large security zones similar to those around Great Lakes power plants. This will prohibit thousands of boating and fishing families from accessing large areas of the very waters held in the public trust. That alone should be unacceptable to the Ohio Power Siting Board, not to mention protecting the health and aesthetics of the state’s most important natural resource.”  This is a must read. See the link to article below

 

The Sierra Club and Columbus are getting Ready for 100% renewable energy

The Sierra Club is working with Columbus on a campaign establish a path to 100 percent renewable energy in the city and how to attain that goal in the next 30+ years. While they ramp up to launching their campaign, the Ready for 100 team will be adding updates to their Facebook page.   What’s not to “like”?    NW Ohio should be forewarned  that Columbus is on the march!

BIG GREEN powered by billions of left wingers and maybe a few Russians

Recharge reports “Ten liberal foundations gave $3.7 billion to environmental groups and causes over eight years….”Foundations have promised $3 billion more to “reduce the rate of global warming.”  Major foundations handed nearly $4 billion to global warming activists, anti-fossil fuel campaigners and other environmentalists over the past eight years, according to a database debuted Monday by the Institute for Energy Research. IER president Tom Pyle said the vast web of funding detailed by Big Green, Inc. shatters the notion environmentalists are locked in a David versus Goliath-like struggle against energy companies.  “The truth is the environmental left is a deep-pocketed and powerful force in American politics that is working to stop all natural gas, oil, and coal production in the United States.”  Meanwhile, Congressman Devin Nunes, Chairman of the House Intelligence Committee might have found Russian collusion.

New Gas Plant in Ohio will produces 1,182 MW of reliable power

South Field Energy LLC  will build a $1.3 billion combined-cycle energy plant in Columbiana County, Ohio. The 1,182-megawatt facility WILL (unlike BigWind) be able to power a million homes. This story notes “Owners and developers of power plants and other energy-generating facilities are increasingly trying to find ways to provide enough power to their customers… The 53 natural gas projects, however, created more installed capacity in megawatts than all the others combined.”

Everyone should read this article from American Thinker: Wind and Solar Good For Nothing

Wind or solar is an appendage to the electrical grid rather than an essential part of the system. If all the wind or solar vanished, the grid would continue operation without the slightest problem, because the grid has to be able handle the load without wind or solar. Thus, wind or solar does not reduce capital investment for traditional generating plants. You may read in the press that coal plants have been replaced by wind or solar. That is never true.”

 Federal Clean Power Plan Scrapped and Affordable Clean Energy Plan (“ACE”) Developed

Renewable advocates are furious that states will be given more authority to establish their own air quality program fearing that older coal plants would be able to continue to operate if they still have a useful life. Ohio Energy Policy director for the Natural Resources Defense Council Dan Sawmiller adds that clean and renewable energy sources will be the losers should ACE be approved, as the proposed rule pits certain power plants against others.   Boo hoo.

Production Tax Credit Race Nearing the Finish

Recharge Reports “After stockpiling gigawatts of wind turbines in 2016 to qualify projects for 100% production tax credit (PTC) value, US developers may have begun to lose a race against the clock if they want to have all of them in commercial operation as federal law requires by the end of 2020.   Without full-value PTC – an inflation-adjusted $24/MWh for electric power sent to the grid for the initial 10 years – many projects would not make economic sense and by extension, not obtain financing. “  

Corporate demand for wind power keeping wind developers in business.

Recharge reports “As US wind developers look to make maximum use of the fading production tax credit (PTC), one of the biggest questions has been whether there would be enough off-takers for all their proposed projects.   Any such concerns seem increasingly quaint. This year is proving to be a blowout for US wind power-purchase agreements (PPAs), with more than 5GW signed in the first half — a 44% increase compared to the same period in 2017 — the highest level since the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) began tracking PPA activity.” 

Operating Expense is starting to surpass the Capital Expense of Wind portending a possible slowdown in new developments. (Recharge-Wind OpEx will soon eclipse CapEx in North America: IHS Markit)

“By 2021 more money will be spent maintaining existing North American wind farms than building new ones, according to market researcher IHS Markit. Each year the existing base of wind farms expands, regardless of how many new projects get built, fueling the ever-expanding global wind operations and maintenance (O&M) market.   ….“The transition from CapEx to OpEx is significant, and the wind industry will need to shift its focus away from infrastructure build and toward providing services and minimizing costs at existing projects,” says Maxwell Cohen, associate director at IHS Markit. The shift has big implications not only for owners of wind farms, but also for turbine manufacturers – most of whom have put a far greater emphasis on O&M revenue in recent years.”

 Tiffin residents OPPOSE BigWind

Boaters say NO to BigWind

15 reasons to kick BigWind away from Lake Erie

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15 Reasons to Reject Wind Turbines in Lake Erie

 

·         Special financial treatment for the wind industry, along with Ohio’s mandate that renewable energy be included in utility companies energy mix, have artificially propped up LEEDCo. It has received $50 million in taxpayer subsidies.

o   “(We) get a tax credit if we build a lot of wind farms. That’s the only reasons to build them. They don’t make sense without the tax credit” – Warren Buffett

 

·         Contrary to LEEDCo’s statements, wind energy is high cost electricity because turbines spin only when the wind blows, roughly 35 percent of the time. Sixty-five percent of the time they are non-productive.

o   Hidden costs come from base load back-up fossil fuel systems that must remain on standby to fill the gaps. Base load systems are designed to run continually, not to be taken offline and restarted to fill in for intermittent wind energy making them more expensive to operate, too.

 

·         Environmentally, turbines destroy hundreds of thousands of bats and birds annually, including protected bald eagles and golden eagles. LEEDCo turbines in Lake Erie will violate the Endangered Species Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

o   A study of one northern California wind farm found it kills about 60 eagles and 2500 other raptors annually . . . The Tennessee Wildlife Federation reported that in just two months the Backbone Mountain wind farm sliced apart 2,000 bats . . . PacifiCorp Energy’s paid a $2.5 million fine for violating the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act by killing 38 golden eagles and 336 other protected birds at its wind farms. . Duke Energy paid a $1 million fine for killing 14 eagles and 149 other birds at its Wyoming wind farm, and more.

·         Wind turbines will spoil the pristine natural horizon of Lake Erie. Cape Wind, which planned to build turbines off Massachusetts, was cancelled after 14-years of planning due to broad public opposition, including lawsuits claiming the project would harm property values, tourism and fishing.

 

o   Lake Erie, once called a “dead lake”, is now a thriving fishery, source of drinking water, and home to countless waterfowl especially the comeback of bald Eagles along the shoreline. It is an internationally important migration route. The BSBO, American Bird Conservancy & National Audubon Society believe that by insisting that LEEDCO completes bird & bat studies through the right process and the right science, it will prove that turbines shouldn’t be built in Lake Erie.

 

·         Icebreaker is a serious environmental threat to Lake Erie and the drinking water it supplies. First, the turbines are certain to stir up and release toxins during their construction and thereafter.

 

o   For decades, multiple toxins, including PCBs, dioxin, mercury, cadmium, lead and arsenic were filtering into Lake Erie and now rest in the lake bottom sediment. Moreover, the Army Corps of Engineers dumped toxic sediment from the Cuyahoga River into Lake Erie for decades. There is an unacceptable risk of stirred up toxic sediments while installing LEEDCo turbines and 12-plus miles of cables. There is also legitimate concern over what else could be stirred up from Cleveland’s heavy industrial past when the lake bottom is disturbed.

 

·         Wind turbines contain 400-plus gallons of industrial lubricants in their gearboxes. Those lubricants need to be changed and gearbox seals fail sending oil into the lake below. Even worse, exploding and burning wind turbines are commonplace. When this occurs, burning turbines will create toxic emissions polluting the lake below.

 

o   Research shows about 120 wind turbines catch fire each year – ten times the number reported by the industry. Fires are a problem for the industry, impacting energy production, economic output and emitting toxins, casting a dark shadow over the industry’s “green” credentials. Wind turbines catch fire because highly flammable materials such as hydraulic oil and plastics are in close proximity to machinery and electrical wires. Winds will quickly fan the fire.

o   To see turbines explode, just go to YouTube and search: “wind turbine fires”

 

·         LEEDCo is set to sell the turbines to Fred. Olsen Renewables (a Norwegian multi-national). Olsen will then sell the electricity from Icebreaker to Cleveland Public Power, Cuyahoga County and others who have prematurely agreed to buy at a rate that’s certain to be much higher than other available sources.

 

o   The cost to construct and maintain an offshore turbine is 3 to 4 times higher than an onshore installation, and Ohio ratepayers will ultimately be stuck with the bills. Icebreaker is projected to cost a total of $126 million to construct, resulting in capacity of 20.7 MWh. For comparison, the “Steel Winds” onshore project near Buffalo cost about 75% less and generates more power capacity. Imagine changing out the lubricants or replacing a gear or blade in high waves or during the winter. They will produce no power until spring at the earliest.

 

 

·         LEEDCo admits Icebreaker is the “demonstrator” project leading to Olsen building as many as 1,400 to 1,600 more turbines in Lake Erie (and likely other Great Lakes) and that will threaten the Ohio’s tourism success and reduce property values.

 

o   A view of 479-foot spinning industrial blades runs contrary to the views many seek for their vacations. A study by North Carolina State University documented over 50 percent of vacationers would not rent a vacation home if wind turbines were in view. The other half would insist on a discounted rate to compensate for the lost view. Moreover, home buyers pay a premium for location and view. But property values have been shown to decrease where views are diminished by wind farms. That triggers a reduction in property tax revenues.

 

·         LEEDCo’s contention that there is widespread approval for Icebreaker is refuted by a Cleveland Plain Dealer study that showed 57.87 percent of those surveyed disapproved of Icebreaker, and many more had no opinion.

 

·         LEEDCo’s inference that some 400 public meetings it says it has held shows approval is simply unsupportable.  Holding a meeting does not confirm approval, and may, in fact, demonstrate the opposite. Evidence is clear the general public has not been made aware of the costs or dangers inherent on Icebreaker.

 

o   For example, LEEDCo’s recent meeting at Cleveland Yacht Club was one where the audience raised many of these questions and LEEDCo’s CEO Lorry Wagner couldn’t answer or rebut major questions.  As a result, the audience came out in clear opposition to Icebreaker/LEEDCO/Fred. Olsen’s project.

·         LEEDCo’s claim that Icebreaker will result in many good jobs is nothing more than fantasy.

o   The US’s first offshore project of five expensive turbines at off Block Island created a few hundred temporary construction jobs and only about six permanent ones – these at a cost of $290 million! In addition, Block Island cost about $150,000 per powered household, a monumental waste and a factual argument against offshore wind value.

 

.   Decommissioning and Disposal issues are additional threats to Lake Erie waters.

 

o   The useful life of a turbine is less than 20 years. They must then be decommissioned and removed. In California, for example, there are thousands of industrial wind turbines that have been abandoned and are falling apart. LEEDCo has no plan to address such an issue. Moreover, if the “demonstrator” project fails to exhibit its effectiveness as a reliable supplier of electricity (as is widely predicted), LEEDCo will be long gone leaving no plans to remove them. Indeed, many of the wind farms built in Europe 20 years ago will lose their government subsidies in 2020 and there are no funds or provisions to remove dead turbines.

 

.   There will be a need for “No Boating” security zones to protect the wind farms just like existing security zones around power plants and similar infrastucture. But these new bans on boating and fishing access will encompass dramatically larger wind farm areas, potentially eliminating hundreds of square miles for recreational boating and fishing.

 

o   In addition, Icebreaker’s power cables will be on the floor of the lake, crossing Cleveland’s main shipping channel. If more turbines are eventually built in the lake, freighters dropping their anchors may run the risk of striking the cable areas in the same way dragging anchors are known to hit underwater oil pipelines elsewhere.

.    A recommendation by the OPSB staff to eliminate overnight operations from March 1 to Jan. 1 unless it can prove to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources and the OPSB that Icebreaker’s the six turbines don’t kill migrating birds and bats is ludicrous.

o   The recommended 2-year radar study of migrating birds must be mandatory, not optional, and results required to be made public at least annually. While the accuracy of such a radar study is questionable given the size of small birds, etc., this and other science-based studies should be required. Up until now, extremely poor studies are being conducted, and the conclusions they reach are not based on sound science. For example, they’ve concluded there were no birds. But they were looking at a time when birds were not moving!

Conclusion:

The Ohio Power Siting Board’s mission is defined as supporting: “sound energy policies that provide for the installation of energy capacity and transmission infrastructure for the benefit of the Ohio citizens, promoting the state’s economic interests, and protecting the environment and land use.”

Going green is fine, but not appropriate in every circumstance or in every locale. In certain places, harnessing the wind just carries an unacceptable environmental risk and unjustifiable price tag. In the case of Icebreaker, the OPSB, ODNR and OEPA must meet their charge to protect the environment and Ohio’s most treasured natural resource, Lake Erie.

Rick Graham

Will Tucker Carlson side with the people or BigWind? Watch Tuesday 8pm

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We understand that at 8:00 p.m. on Tuesday, August 14th, Tucker Carlson
will air a segment on Fox News exploring the impact of industrial wind
development in the path of military aviation assets.  Carlson’s guest on the
program will be Texas State Senator Donna Campbell, author of legislation
enacted last year prohibiting tax incentives for wind energy projects within
25 miles of military aviation bases that use fixed-wing aircraft.  This
legislation – now law –  passed the Texas House 134 to 10. It is intended to
protect military bases from encroachment issues relating to airspace as well
as effects of radar equipment. THIS IS A VERY BIG DEAL! THIS IS THE 1ST TIME THIS ISSUE HAS GARNED NATIONAL MEDIA ATTENTION!!

In the last issue of Wind News we urged everyone to watch the Ohio Supreme
Court proceedings in the Ohio Black fork Wind case:
http://www.ohiochannel.org/collections/supreme-court-of-ohio;jsessionid=c5aa
45e7c644f61e80911ac6db7e?0
.  If you have not watched, we encourage you to do

so.  This week, Black Fork filed another appeal to the Ohio Supreme Court
challenging the Ohio Power Siting Board’s second extension of time to
January 23, 2020, the use of a new turbine model, the Vestas V110 2.2 M, and
the denial of the intervenors’ request for a rehearing. A copy of the appeal
is attached.  It is notable in this case that Black Fork previously added
the Vestas 2.0 MW model though filing an Amendment but when they sought to
upgrade the model once again, Black Fork did not file an amendment. Black
Fork thus was able to evade the revised property line setbacks established
in 2014.

In other news:

OHIO

*       The Cleveland Plain Dealer tries to make a big deal out of local
citizens receiving help from the owner of Murray Coal in challenging the
Lake Erie Icebreaker project.  Mr. Murray responds to the paper with a
Letter to the Editor which is followed by  a comment that asks “Are you
aware that, by spending $126 million in another way, we could build
generating capacity able to produce roughly 12 times more electricity and
eliminate 6 times more annual CO2 emissions than the Icebreaker wind
turbines?” Another commenter claims wind turbines must be put in the lake
because of restrictive rules for land-based turbines.

*       The Ohio Agricultural Law Blog addresses whether someone can
interfere with the surface water drainage on someone else’s property.  The
answer to this question lies in Ohio’s “reasonable use doctrine,” which
establishes guidelines for when a landowner has a legal right to affect the
drainage of surface water onto another property.  The new law bulletin,
“Surface Water Drainage Rights”” explains this important legal doctrine.

*       A story from the Sandusky area caught our attention as State Rep
Michael Sheehy, D-Oregon, said he’s concerned people in cities won’t be
represented when lawmakers form a new committee to study harmful algal
blooms in western Lake Erie. He thinks people from the city who need clean
water ought to have a seat at the table when Ag and the Farm Bureau discuss
how to reduce algal blooms.  We included this article because wondered if
someone will try claim that people in cities who want to breath clean air
should have a say in wind energy.  We could be stretching it a bit but you
never know….