Ohio lawmakers are being lied to by BigWind

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Illinois votes for 2,250 feet BigWind setback from a PROPERTY LINE. How does this decision make Ohio lawmakers look? Stupid? Uninformed? Bribed? You decide. Ohio setbacks are anything BUT restrictive to BigWind! Congratulations to the BigWind warriors in Illinois.  Unfortunately, as you read below, this decision was too late for some residents….

The Ford County Board made clear Thursday that its No. 1 priority in establishing new rules for wind farms is to ensure the health, safety and welfare of its citizens — and not to ensure that more wind farms are built. (Stop right there! Continue reading below for the truth- as long as we, the taxpayers, continue to subsidize this energy, there will be support for future projects!)

With 10 of its 12 members present, the board voted 9-1 in favor of a proposal to restrict wind turbines from being built any closer than 2,250 feet from a property line…

But the measure also is considered so restrictive that the developers of three proposed wind farms in Ford County may be forced to pull the plug on their projects, as each of them told the board after the vote…

‘I’m living it’
Under Ford County’s existing wind-farm rules, which were implemented 10 years ago prior to two wind farms being built in the county, turbines could be sited as close as 1,000 feet from a home, as opposed to a property line.

And some rural residents — including a few county board members — have experienced problems as a result.

“I’m living it, and (board member) Gene (May of rural Paxton) is living it,” said board member Tom McQuinn, whose rural Paxton home is about 2,500 feet from a turbine within the Pioneer Trail Wind Farm. “So I don’t need somebody to tell me what all the statistics are (regarding the noise and shadow flicker turbines can cause). I see it. I hear it.”…

Under the measure approved by the board, McQuinn noted,  developers could negotiate with landowners to have them sign waivers to allow turbines to be built as close as 1,000 feet to a home….

“I think my property line means something, and it should to everyone out there.”…

‘There will be interest’
Ford County resident Dean Dillon said he doubts the larger setback will mean no more wind farms come to the county, though…

And the comment that (the engineer) made was, considering the number of turbines we already have and the interest that is being shown (by developers), he would wager that if the companies that are showing interest now left because of property-line measures or because of the length of setback, that they would probably be replaced by other companies as long as the federal government continues to subsidize wind (energy).

“He said, ‘Don’t dilute yourself into thinking these are the only companies that will ever be interested in wind in Ford County.’ He said, ‘Apparently you have ideal conditions, and that’s going to attract attention.”…

SetbackLink

Illinois ‘over’pays for BigWind power, will Ohio?

 

Wise people learn from the mistakes of others, so they don’t repeat the mistakes, themselves. Will Ohio legislators learn from this lesson (and a multitude of other states and countries)? Let us hope so, for the sake of our businesses and residents…

For Springfield aldermen opposed to the 10-year-old Sierra Club deal that required the city to buy power from two wind farms, December 2018 can’t come fast enough.
By then, both contracts will have expired, at which point City Water, Light and Power estimates it will have spent up to $150 million. So far, the utility has spent about $101 million.
Ward 10 Ald. Ralph Hanauer, who wasn’t on the city council when the deals were approved, calls the wind-power contracts “the most costly mistake in the city of Springfield.” He added that the lack of a clause that allows the restructuring of the contacts to keep costs closer to market value — as just happened with CWLP’s coal contract — was part of the mistake….

The Sierra Club’s wind-power agreement… The 2016 price for both contracts for wind power is $58.97/MWh, according to figures provided by the city.
The variable cost of producing the same power from CWLP’s own generation has been about half that — less than $30/Mwh — over the course of the wind contracts. And the new price in the most recent coal contract makes CWLP’s variable cost of generation even lower — roughly $17 to $26/MWh, depending on the unit….

“Wise economics should determine whether future wind and solar investments are pursued,” McMenamin said. “Generally speaking, going forward, municipally owned electric utilities should concentrate on electricity distribution rather than generation.”…

“At the time, we didn’t realize how devastating it was going to be,” Redpath said.
While walking his ward and talking to the residents, Redpath said he’s run into a lot of people who are opposed to the wind-power contracts.
“There’s definitely a lesson for the future,” he said. “We have to be very, very careful when this contract comes back up. I don’t know how I could vote for it in most any form.”
Source: CWLP shells out $100M-plus for wind power

How much $ will your school ‘ACTUALLY’ receive if BigWind becomes a neighbor?

This is an excellent, short analysis. Do you have a county, near you, with wind turbines throwing back some of their ‘pocket change’ to a school district? Why do I call hundreds of thousands of dollars, pocket change? Because, a wind site receives hundreds of millions of taxpayer dollars to build and produce energy- through subsidies, tax abatements etc. Do you actually know of a (BigWind host) county that has reduced their taxes to residents? Do you actually know of a (BigWind host) community where real estate values have INcreased? Do you actually know of a (BigWind host) school district that has been able to hire more teachers? If you do, please contact us on our home page. I won’t wait to hear from you…

“An estimated $32.5 million of the money would go toward the Maroa-Forsyth and Warrensburg-Latham school districts.”

This sentence is misleading. The wind developer’s application to the Macon County Board identifies $32.5 million as the estimated new tax revenue that would be allocated to the two school districts but goes on to note that for every new dollar of tax revenue that a district receives the state decreases the amount of state aid. The application shows the net increase to the Maroa-Forsyth district is less than $4.5 million and Warrensburg a little over $4.1 million.

These estimated tax revenues are over 30 years. The average yearly net increase for Maroa-Forsyth and Warrensburg districts would be $150,000 each. This increase would hardly cover two new positions in each district.

These values are not guaranteed either by the wind farm developer or the state. Whether these districts will receive any of this estimated revenue is uncertain….

Source: Wind turbine taxes may never be realized | Letters to the Editor | herald-review.com

Illinois residents hear the truth about BigWind and say NO

It is incredible that BigWind denies the truth about the noise, flicker and vibrations, when there are individuals, all over the world, experiencing the problems! Will Wind Turbines become the next scandal like cigarettes? Not only do you read about individuals affected by BigWind, in this article, but you can read the 2nd link (bottom of page) about more individuals suffering in Illinois. One affected citizen complains about noise and he resides 1.5 miles AWAY from a turbine!?! We must be vigilant to stop the efforts of BigWind attempting to reduce our setbacks in Ohio  – below 1,250 feet…..

After 40 days of hearings, the Bureau County Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA) recommended denial of all of the 127 applications of Walnut Ridge Wind LLC (WRW) to build industrial wind turbines. The ZBA considered the testimony of dozens of witnesses and experts on the impacts of such turbines. Six different people who live near projects in Illinois and Wisconsin testified the turbines cause extreme noise, flickering shadows, vibration and sleep deprivation. They suffered from symptoms commonly known as Wind Turbine Syndrome which involves feelings of motion sickness and vertigo. Three of the families abandoned their dream homes to escape the turbines.

An expert testified that neighbors will sustain up to a 50 percent loss in the value of their property. Nonetheless, WRW refuses to site turbines away from people’s homes nor will it agree to any property value protection plan. The ZBA unanimously found “the applicant has not produced sufficient evidence that the project will not diminish residential property values along the footprint.”…

 

Source: Zoning board denies wind turbines applications | Bureau County Republican

additional: Illinois wind problems

Ohio BigWind doesn’t have ‘their ducks in a row’

The Dayton and Springfield papers report on HB 190 to give County Commissioners the opportunity to reduce the setbacks currently provided in the law. UNU notes that only the opportunity to reduce – not lengthen – setbacks is proposed. If current setbacks are the MINIMUM, we can only conclude that to reduce them would put families in harm’s way. We encourage everyone to watch the video shot earlier this month when a wind turbine failed in Germany and a 176 lb “fragment” was thrown 1, 670 feet. This short video gives an excellent overview of the debris field. We are reminded of the blade failure in 2012 at the Timber Road II wind farm in Paulding County. Blade Throw

A Windlab representative and the attorney for Greenwich Neighbors United appeared at a recent Township Trustee meeting to address the fact that 62% of the turbines in the Greenwich Wind project do not meet minimum setbacks and waivers have not been secured. The OPSB has approved the project despite Windlab’s failure to obtain setback waivers. GNU will appeal to the Ohio Supreme Court. So, is Ohio ‘out of step’ with the rest of the country/world with our current setbacks?

In Boone County, Illinois an ordinance was passed that all wind turbines must be placed at a minimum of 2640 feet from a PROPERTY LINE. Waivers are allowed, which can reduce the turbine setback down to 1,500 feet from a residence ONLY if the host or neighbor agrees to the wind energy company’s waiver. 1,500 feet from a residence is the minimum distance allowed. The waivers would be negotiated with individual neighbors and land owners. Setbacks from roads or easement are now set at twice the turbine height. “Mainstream Renewables was attempting to develop a wind farm in Boone County, but tonight’s vote by well-informed county board members effectively rejected the wind industry’s claims that industrial wind turbines were merely “annoying” and not necessarily “harmful” at distances less than 0.5 miles from property lines. Mainstream Renewable’s attorney, James Griffin, tried to make claims that the setback waiver would be “unconstitutional,” but the Boone County State’s attorney did not support his argument.”   Boone County setback

In Falmouth, MA where the wind turbines have been a source of ongoing headaches for local government and residents, it now comes to light that the City government was advised by Vestas that the noise ratings of the turbines would be substantially higher under certain conditions and that the manufacturer had concerns about safety from ice throw. The 2010 letter which has just come to light states “The manufacturer also needs confirmation that the Town of Falmouth understands they are fully responsible for the site selection of the turbine and bear all responsibilities to address any mitigation needs of the neighbors.” It is hard to fathom why it took five years for this letter to be made public.

We provide information on the wind turbine siting rules for Freedom, Maine where “To protect the health, safety and welfare of the citizens of Freedom, Turbines shall be set back from the property line of any non-participating land owner a distance of no less than 13 times the turbine height.” That would be about 4,000 feet for a 300’ turbine. The noise measurements are standard 5 decibels over background and shadow flicker is limited to 10 hours a year.  Maine setback ……

A developer of wind energy said Tuesday she’s excited to begin construction of a wind turbine park in rural Greenwich and looks forward to the project generating money for the community.

But Jensen is way ahead of herself, according to an attorney for a group of rural Greenwich residents opposed to the project.

“They don’t have all their ducks in a row,” said the attorney, Sam Randazzo of the Columbus-area firm McNees Wallace & Nurick. He represents the group of residents calling themselves Greenwich Neighbors United.

The lawyer, who specializes in energy and Jensen were in the same room following a Greenwich Township Trustees meeting on Tuesday. After the township officials met, Randazzo explained to a roomful of residents who oppose the project that Jensen has work to do before construction can begin.

Jensen listened to Randazzo without expressing noticeable outward signs of disapproval.

Randazzo has said out of the project’s 25 turbines, 62 percent violate the minimum setback requirements, amounting to “at least 100 (affected) property owners.”…

Source: ‘They don’t have all their ducks in a row’

Pay attn Ohio, BigWind is being sued in Illinois

APEX has purchased the wind energy leases from BP Wind in Southern Van Wert County/Mercer County/abutting Allen County. Why haven’t they built a massive wind farm, yet? Thankfully, our legislators have enacted safe setbacks and frozen our renewable energy mandate (temporarily). However, some in the legislature, want to change our setbacks and allow our county commissioners to ‘override’ the safe setbacks. As this lawsuit explains, that is not a wise idea. Let us hope Ohio legislators continue to educate themselves about the realities behind this industry!…

APEX is defending against a Class Action lawsuit seeking in excess of five million dollars. This is the same company that is building turbines as we speak in Vermilion County.  Lucky for Apex, most of the local Vermilion County residents have signed “good neighbor agreements”.  Too bad for those that signed.

This suit seeks more than $5 million for infringing on property rights and for adverse health effects.

Read the suit below:…

APEX and other Wind Energy Companies, defending Class Action Suit… | Illinois Leaks.

BigWind “noise” now an EXclusion for farmers’ umbrella liability insurance

Country Insurance Mutual Insurance in Bloomington, Illinois has added “noise” to its list of exclusions for farm umbrella liability coverage.  Noise joins a list of named pollutants.  Champaign County residents will recall when EverPower and the Farm Bureau took a busload of people to Bloomington where a significant number of industrial wind turbines are located.  There have been reports of pushback in Illinois since that time.  Country Mutual’ s policy changes may cause farmers to think more carefully before signing a wind lease. This makes greater setbacks even more important!….

We value the trust you have in Country Financial for your insurance needs.  In a few weeks, we will send your revised policy, with changes effective with your policy renewal…

Illinois Amendatory – coverage restrictions

Defininitions…

– A definition of “noise” has been added. It means any wanted, or unwanted, distracting, annoying, disturbine or physically harmful sound…

via: http://edgarcountywatchdogs.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/COUNTRY-Mutual-Insurance-Company.pdf