Country of Poland proves that Ohio’s wind turbines setbacks are weak

 

The BigWind companies in Ohio are, chronically and constantly, arguing that our setbacks from property lines are entirely too restrictive. So restrictive, in fact, that it hampers THEIR success in our state. But, what about OUR residents?  We recently blogged about an individual in Van Wert county who has struggled (and still is) with excessive NOISE from a nearby turbine. Noise that interferes with normal life at home…and she is not alone, there are more. Who will protect our citizens against these industrial giants? Particularly, as they age, maintenance/noise/problems can plague them. BigWind IS lobbying, HARD, to convince our legislators to REDUCE the distance from turbines to our property lines. Below, is the NIH from the country of Poland, who believes that BigWind setbacks should be much GREATER than they are at this time. Ohio has been fortunate, so far, that BigWind has predominantly ‘planted’ itself in very sparsley occupied areas. If this changes, more people WILL have problems….

The National Institute of Public Health – National Institute of Hygiene is of the opinion that wind farms situated too close to buildings intended for permanent human occupation may have a negative impact on the well-being and health of the people living in their proximity.

The human health risk factors that the Institute has taken into consideration in its position are as follows:

the emitted noise level and its dependence on the technical specifications of turbines, wind speed as well as the topography and land use around the wind farm,
aerodynamic noise level including infrasound emissions and low-frequency noise components,
the nature of the noise emitted, taking into account its modulation/impulsive/tonal characteristics and the possibility of interference of waves emitted from multiple turbines,
the risk of ice being flung from rotors,
the risk of turbine failure with a rotor blade or its part falling,
the shadow flicker effect…

the probability of sleep disruptions and noise propagation at night,
the level of nuisance and probability of stress and depression symptoms occurring (in consequence of long exposure), related both to noise emissions and to non-acceptance of the noise source.
In the Institute’s opinion, the laws and regulations currently in force in Poland (regarding risk factors which, in practice, include only the noise level) are not only inadequate to facilities such noise source as wind turbines, but they also fail to guarantee a sufficient degree of public health protection. The methodology currently used for environmental impact assessment of wind farms (including human health) is not applicable to wind speeds exceeding 5 m/s. In addition, it does not take into account the full frequency range (in particular, low frequency) and the nuisance level….

Having regard to the above, until a comprehensive methodology is developed for the assessment of the impact of industrial wind farms on human health, the Institute recommends 2 km as the minimum distance of wind farms from buildings. The recommended value results from a critical assessment of research results published in reviewed scientific periodicals with regard to all potential risk factors for average distance usually specified within the following limits:

0.5-0.7 km, often obtained as a result of calculations, where the noise level (dBA) meets the currently acceptable values (without taking into account adjustments for the impulse/tonal/modulation features of the nose emitted),
1.5-3.0 km, resulting from the noise level, taking into account modulation, low frequencies and infrasound levels,
0.5-1.4 km, related to the risk of turbine failure with a broken rotor blade or its part falling (depending on the size of the piece and its flight profile, rotor speed and turbine type),
0.5-0.8 km, where there is a risk of ice being flung from rotors (depending on the shape and mass of ice, rotor speed and turbine type),
1.0-1.6 km, taking into account the noise nuisance level (between 4% and 35% of the population at 30-45 dBA) for people living in the vicinity of wind farms,
the distance of 1.4-2.5 km, related to the probability of sleep disruptions (on average, between 4% and 5% of the population at 30-45 dBA),
2,0 km, related to the occurrence of potential psychological effects resulting from substantial landscape changes (based on the case where the wind turbine is a dominant landscape feature and the rotor movement is clearly visible and noticeable to people from any location),
1.2-2.1 km, for the shadow flicker effect (for the average wind turbine height in Poland, including the rotor from 120 to 210 m).
In its opinions. the Institute has also considered the recommended distances of wind farms from buildings, as specified by experts, scientists, as well as central and local government bodies around the world (in most cases recommended from 1.0 to 5.0 km)….

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List of BigWind REJECTIONS all over the USA. Need help? Look here!

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Do you wonder what other states are doing to fight BigWind? It is a growing list of actions that have been taken to protect individuals and communities. Please click the link, below and view the spreadsheet and see if there has been an action that could help you!!!

An interesting addition to our post from 2 days ago…we posted a video of a noisy turbine that is affecting a household in Van Wert, Ohio.  Iberdrola developed this industrial wind site LESS than 6 years ago and we have repeatedly blogged about developers SELLING their sites BEFORE the 10 year mark, due to maintenance issues and the end of the PTC $ at the 10 year mark.  Iberdrola has LEFT THE VAN WERT AREA and sold/merged the project! This household has been UNable to get through the telephone line of the ‘new’ BigWind company that is ‘supposed’ to be operating the site!!! Don’t let this happen to your neighborhood!!!

 

Sometimes, turbines make grown men cry

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The following letter elicits many emotions that range from beautiful to maddening, but this is why we fight. This is why we care. This is why we must stand up to the injustice that BigWind brings into our communities…

“I’m home, safe and sound.”Words that should always go together.
But yesterday I had an emotional visit with Ted Hartke and his beautiful wife Jessica.
I was returning from Missouri and, with nothing but time to kill on my 11 hour drive home, I gave Ted a call.

He pointed out that I would be very near the home he and his family abandoned due to wind turbine noise and he would like to take me through the now-empty home. So I took him up on the offer.
We spent a long time together…
It is hard to describe the feelings Ted and Jessica expressed as we visited in front of the abandoned home that was once their dream.
Violated? Robbed? Victimized?
All the things that were so important to them only three years ago- before the turbines went into operation-things like getting the yard just right, picking the right paint colors and flooring, and commemorating their new-home-in-progress with their very young children’s hand prints in freshly poured concrete- were stripped of their precious value by by the nuisance trespass of Chicago-based InvEnergy, a multi-billion dollar wind energy corporation with little conscience.
As soon as the turbines went into operation, the noise from the nearly 500′ tall turbines invaded their home and deprived them of sleep. When operating at or near their rated capacity, every pass of the a turbine blade sent low frequency noise pulsation through the wall of their home, stealing their rest.
Nothing would stop they noise. They moved all their beds into the interior of their home in a futile attempt to escape invading energy. They asked Invenergy to stop the turbines and they sometime complied. But in the end, profits were more important than people.
So they abandoned their dream home that was in “just the perfect spot with a perfect view” and instead took on a second home and a second mortgage and all the additional expenses that come with two homes. Maybe some would have just left the lender high and dry. But Ted and Jessica aren’t those kind of people.
Ted and Jessica have finally found a new home and are improving that new home like we all do.
New homes usually bring joy and a sense of new adventure. But Ted and Jessica’s new home experience is haunted by dark thoughts born of bitter experience.
The first thought (expressed in my words): “We already went though the hard negotiations couples go through as they decorate a home together. Paint colors, finishes, landscaping, kitchen designs. It is stressful enough for a couple to do once. But now we are forced to go through it again due to someone else’s negligent behavior.” And the second thought: “Dare we invest our emotions into another home when our hearts were broken in those moments the turbines started to spin just three years ago?”
The feelings are the feelings of grief and loss. And violation.
They struggle together, recovering from trauma- an unnecessary and pointless trauma- that, unbeknownst to them, began years ago as opportunistic and now faceless lobbyists roamed the nation’s legislatures under a false cloak of credibility selling a bogus cure for an over-hyped disease. And their trauma was enabled by all-too-willing engineers and planning commissioners who violated their oaths to protect human beings from harm.
They profit. Ted and Jessica paid.
Just like Cary Shineldecker and Karen L. Ward Shineldecker paid. And just like the David Peplinski family and all the other past and present litigants and victims in Huron County, Missaukee County, Delta County, Mason County and across the Midwest. They borrow against their retirement to hire attorneys to then spend years in court trying to recover their most precious commodity- a home, safe and sound. And at best they receive money. But money does not bring justice.
Ted said to me “Imagine being at a party and seeing a man tapping your wife lightly on the shoulder, again and again. That would be annoying for my wife. But how much worse would it be for me as her husband to have to stand by and be powerless to stop it? Those turbines-InvEnergy turbines-reached through the walls of our house and touched my wife and my children and I could not make it stop.”
That is when Ted and I, two grown men well over 6 feet tall, “tough rugged and independent”, stood in his Illinois driveway and wept.
People think wind turbines look cool.
But sometimes wind turbines make people cry.
Cary Shineldecker and Karen L. Ward Shineldecker and I have wept. Ted and Jessica and I have wept. I have cried many times when talking to victims of irresponsible wind development and with those who try to halt it.
I am not ashamed. I weep for people who are needless victims.
And I also weep for those who watch suffering and do not weep…and do not make it stop.
-Kevon Martis

BigWind destroys milking cows in France

Farmers, in the USA, need to do their homework before signing leases with BigWind. Although this video is from France, a similar situation has also occurred in Wisconsin…

France, host of the U.N. climate conference, prides itself on being one of the world’s top innovators in wind energy technology, and wind turbines have become a symbol of the country’s commitment to clean energy. But the French government is coming under fire from farmers and others who say the proximity of some of the turbines is hurting wildlife and cattle. VOA Europe Correspondent Luis Ramirez went to a dairy farm in the northern Picardy region to get one farmer’s story

Source: French Farmer Sues Wind Farm Over Stressed Cows

BigWind leaseholders in Michigan have regrets

How many of you think that all residents living INside industrial wind sites are happy? You need to listen to this Youtube video from residents & leaseholders in Michigan. Will this happen to our neighbors in Ohio? Remember, BigWind is now lobbying, in Ohio, to reduce our 1,250 foot setback and give the decision-making rights to our county commissioners….

Two Michigan residents share their experiences living inside utility scale wind plants. One is a long time supporter of wind energy and another is a man who has leased his ground to wind developers. Both now have profound regret….

https://youtu.be/ps6tJMSXKic

 

 

Indiana seeks greater setbacks than Ohio for BigWind

BigWind cries about Ohio’s wind turbine setbacks, enacted last year; however, once again, we find others desiring even more stringent setbacks than our own. Why? The truth is spreading like a wildfire. People are aware that some individuals ARE affected by infrasound from these machines…

The debate over a wind farm in Fayette County is picking up steam again, as there will be a public hearing on a petition from a group of residents seeking to extend the setback distance for wind turbines in Fayette County…

The WPCC, however, has expressed concerns over the county’s current zoning ordinance on setback distances for wind turbines — 1,000 feet — and feels a greater distance is needed, in order for those residents who are not participating in the project to be safeguarded against physical and environmental concerns, such as shadow flicker and noise, they have concerning the wind turbines.

NextEra Energy Resources, as part of their previous agreements with the county, has stated it would implement a 1,400- foot setback for wind turbines from non-participating landowners, but the WPCC wants to see a greater distance, according to the petition submitted to county commissioners.

“It is a petition for a zoning ordinance amendment,” Commissioner Frank Jackson said during Tuesday’s meeting. “What is being requested is a 2,640-foot setback from property lines of non-participating landowners, plus 2,640 from the participating landowners residence, and the same for public conservation lands, public parks, public schools, fire stations, et cetera.”

The petition clarifies that participating landowners in a wind project can waive, in writing, the 2,640-foot setback concerning a wind turbine on their property, and also requests that the noise level of both commercial and non-commercial wind turbines be no greater than 35 decibels measured from the nearest residence — excluding the residence of a participating landowner — and that the noise level can measure no greater than that with the exception of a utility outage or severe storm occurrence….

County to have public hearing on turbine setbacks | Hoosier Herald.

How far away does your home have to be from a turbine to keep its $ value?

THE leading wind turbine appraisal expert in the USA has spoken, and what he said is not good for BigWind. Here, in Ohio, we must be thankful for our legislature, last year.  They approved INcreased setbacks from property lines for industrial wind turbines – although still woefully Inadequate.  Additionally, it was refreshing to see our Governor approve a ‘freeze’ on our renewable energy standards. Both of these legislative victories have given us time to gather more information, like this, about the negative impacts that industrial wind turbines can have on our property, communities, citizens, businesses and economy…

Michael McCann, of McCann Appraisal, LLC, a Chicago-based company, testified about property values and how they are negatively affected when wind turbines are installed.

    He said he has 33 years experience in appraising many types of commercial real estate, land and special use properties. He also has extensive litigation experience, qualified as an expert witness in over 20 states, and has testified at federal and state trials, zoning hearings, utility siting boards and arbitration. He has also done work for other wind farm projects throughout the United States….

    He also illustrated reasons for people to sell property with a turbine on or near it include health impacts….

    He also listed issues he called “more physical in nature.” These included trespass or intrusion, excessive noise, vibrations, odor, contaminants and flicker….

    McCann said overall results showed a 25 percent lower value within three miles of the turbines as compared to control sales more than three miles away from turbines.

    Property impact studies have been done throughout the world and one he described showed assessed values indicated a 20 percent deviation from assessed sale value.

    McCann also said he came to some conclusions, including having a setback of less than three miles can cause a significant loss of value, as well as many of the health problems people have described to him in the past that qualified experts have agreed with.

    “They (doctors) do find it happens,” McCann said. “It doesn’t happen to everybody.”

    McCann also noted that people should hire appraisers that comply with the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisers Practice, especially in cases like this.

Experts offers insight to wind farm questions – News – Pontiac Daily Leader – Pontiac, IL – Pontiac, IL.