Country of Poland proves that Ohio’s wind turbines setbacks are weak

 

The BigWind companies in Ohio are, chronically and constantly, arguing that our setbacks from property lines are entirely too restrictive. So restrictive, in fact, that it hampers THEIR success in our state. But, what about OUR residents?  We recently blogged about an individual in Van Wert county who has struggled (and still is) with excessive NOISE from a nearby turbine. Noise that interferes with normal life at home…and she is not alone, there are more. Who will protect our citizens against these industrial giants? Particularly, as they age, maintenance/noise/problems can plague them. BigWind IS lobbying, HARD, to convince our legislators to REDUCE the distance from turbines to our property lines. Below, is the NIH from the country of Poland, who believes that BigWind setbacks should be much GREATER than they are at this time. Ohio has been fortunate, so far, that BigWind has predominantly ‘planted’ itself in very sparsley occupied areas. If this changes, more people WILL have problems….

The National Institute of Public Health – National Institute of Hygiene is of the opinion that wind farms situated too close to buildings intended for permanent human occupation may have a negative impact on the well-being and health of the people living in their proximity.

The human health risk factors that the Institute has taken into consideration in its position are as follows:

the emitted noise level and its dependence on the technical specifications of turbines, wind speed as well as the topography and land use around the wind farm,
aerodynamic noise level including infrasound emissions and low-frequency noise components,
the nature of the noise emitted, taking into account its modulation/impulsive/tonal characteristics and the possibility of interference of waves emitted from multiple turbines,
the risk of ice being flung from rotors,
the risk of turbine failure with a rotor blade or its part falling,
the shadow flicker effect…

the probability of sleep disruptions and noise propagation at night,
the level of nuisance and probability of stress and depression symptoms occurring (in consequence of long exposure), related both to noise emissions and to non-acceptance of the noise source.
In the Institute’s opinion, the laws and regulations currently in force in Poland (regarding risk factors which, in practice, include only the noise level) are not only inadequate to facilities such noise source as wind turbines, but they also fail to guarantee a sufficient degree of public health protection. The methodology currently used for environmental impact assessment of wind farms (including human health) is not applicable to wind speeds exceeding 5 m/s. In addition, it does not take into account the full frequency range (in particular, low frequency) and the nuisance level….

Having regard to the above, until a comprehensive methodology is developed for the assessment of the impact of industrial wind farms on human health, the Institute recommends 2 km as the minimum distance of wind farms from buildings. The recommended value results from a critical assessment of research results published in reviewed scientific periodicals with regard to all potential risk factors for average distance usually specified within the following limits:

0.5-0.7 km, often obtained as a result of calculations, where the noise level (dBA) meets the currently acceptable values (without taking into account adjustments for the impulse/tonal/modulation features of the nose emitted),
1.5-3.0 km, resulting from the noise level, taking into account modulation, low frequencies and infrasound levels,
0.5-1.4 km, related to the risk of turbine failure with a broken rotor blade or its part falling (depending on the size of the piece and its flight profile, rotor speed and turbine type),
0.5-0.8 km, where there is a risk of ice being flung from rotors (depending on the shape and mass of ice, rotor speed and turbine type),
1.0-1.6 km, taking into account the noise nuisance level (between 4% and 35% of the population at 30-45 dBA) for people living in the vicinity of wind farms,
the distance of 1.4-2.5 km, related to the probability of sleep disruptions (on average, between 4% and 5% of the population at 30-45 dBA),
2,0 km, related to the occurrence of potential psychological effects resulting from substantial landscape changes (based on the case where the wind turbine is a dominant landscape feature and the rotor movement is clearly visible and noticeable to people from any location),
1.2-2.1 km, for the shadow flicker effect (for the average wind turbine height in Poland, including the rotor from 120 to 210 m).
In its opinions. the Institute has also considered the recommended distances of wind farms from buildings, as specified by experts, scientists, as well as central and local government bodies around the world (in most cases recommended from 1.0 to 5.0 km)….

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The ‘rest of the story’ about Van Wert, Ohio turbines

How often does BigWind create a positive atmosphere in the community? How often does it bring unity? How often do Facts relay the Truth? rarely…..

To the editor,

Citizens for Clear Skies is a group formed to bring the truth to the community on the dynamics of wind energy. We are accused of only being negative from the opposition group. This is our collaborative response to their last letter:

We see significant reductions in this technology globally due to governments becoming more educated in time over the detrimental impact to consumer power bills.

We see an intermittent “resource”, one that is rarely present when consumers need it most….

We see structures that bring an “urban” feel to the country by dominating the skies, not the peace and quiet we feel we deserve by choosing to live rurally.

We see greed at the expense of your neighbors in their property value depreciation.

We see companies that use schools as their primary pawns, then paint those opposed as anti-school and anti-community.

We see taxpayer backed technologies that put hundred of millions into the pockets of company investors, while providing a fraction of that profit to a community affected….

We see farmers that have a choice whether to prevent urban sprawl or choose to sell their land.

We see a community where farmers by far have the most capital and land, as compared to other residents.

We see and hear countless stories of shadow flicker, sound and vibrational disturbances that cause serious negative health impacts on many, not non-intrusive objects to farm around.

We see trespass zoning and zoning laws that protect all citizens, not someone’s right to circumvent laws that have existed much longer than this technology.

We see small town residents buying into the massive expansion of government instead of maintaining the small government principles that make our country work better.

We see energy that is inherently more expensive and less reliable when we need it most, one that does little or nothing to reduce CO2 emissions.

We see an issue in climate change, one where relevant studies and data from opposition is completely suppressed by a willing media to promote their leftist agenda, rather than allow public debate.

We see a negative contribution to a country already 20 trillion dollars in debt, a debt that our children will have to repay at some point, the kind of big government that would make Eastern European countries proud (while they are ironically reducing this technology significantly)….

We see community and family division, not a positive attitude, solely created by this intrusion.

Hopefully Van Wert really digs into this issue and realizes what is happening globally with this technology. Recently one wind developer claimed that Ohio was not a solid wind energy resource. Wind energy is being fought and failing in many places in the country, not just Van Wert. People in the Blue Creek foot print are suffering. There are ample testimonials of families and their dealings with wind energy. It is claimed that wind energy will attract people to live here, but we find that to be dishonest. Ask someone considering relocation to Van Wert if they would buy a rural property under monstrous wind turbines, or would choose to live in the city or elsewhere? We think that answer is pretty obvious.

Citizens for Clear Skies

Van Wert county commissioner opinion of BigWind

A Van Wert county commissioner opinion about the new potential for a 35,000 Apex project. He compares this to living next to a hog farm…which no one wants to do. If you have heard that communities are torn apart by the wind industry, he hints at that reality in Van Wert. What will happen if the Apex Long Prairie Project moves forward? It looks like the one commissioner wants to leave this decision up to the people who will reside amongst it. Read a lot of common sense in this article…

Wanna start an argument? Go to almost any random group of people in Van Wert County and state your opinion about windmills. Chances are, you will quickly find someone with whom to disagree…

But, if you are going to build something on your property, you are subject to a tax assessment. Real property taxes are assessed on all land, buildings and structures. If a property owner would choose to build a windmill, they would be taxed on its full value.

The question then is should a wind farm receive a tax break? The pro crowd argues that, yes, most definitely, this is economic development and a tax break should be automatic. The current wind farm is taxed pursuant to a Payment In Lieu of Taxes (PILOT) wherein the schools, county, townships, and other agencies receive a fixed payment instead of the windmills being normally assessed. This results in about a 70-80 percent reduction in tax payments.

A few years ago, before the state changed the setbacks and after several conferences with our township trustees, the Ohio Power Siting Board and Iberdrola, we determined that the PILOT eliminated our ability to negotiate with wind companies and was not in our county’s best interest. We revoked the Alternative Energy Zone designation for our county that had allowed the Blue Creek Wind Farm to be taxed under the PILOT.

Should the setbacks be returned to a manageable distance for Apex or Iberdrola to build a farm, this is the issue we would present to voters. We would ask the affected townships and the wind company to negotiate a tax scheme that has a chance to be approved and then submit it for an up or down vote.

A concern becomes who gets to vote on this issue? It does not seem appropriate that areas that stand only to benefit from a taxing scheme be allowed to vote to burden another area. For example, if a mega hog farm would want to locate on the outskirts of Convoy and the tax benefits would accrue to every other part of the county, what might be the result in Middle Point of that vote? Or if the roles were reversed, what might be the result in Convoy?

Van Wert City Schools would receive a significant monetary benefit if turbines were located in Liberty Township. But it is the residents of Liberty Township who would be burdened by the presence of the windmills and it would be that township’s tax revenues that are affected by a reduction in the amounts paid by windmill owners. I don’t know a definition of fair that would allow Van Wert City voters, an overwhelming majority of the school district, to determine this issue for Liberty Township….

Personally, I think I’ve been clear on my position in the past. I think windmills are horrible federal policy but as long as the federal government is intent on bankrupting our next generation, I wouldn’t object to see some of that money get wasted locally.

If you are in the pro crowd, I would advise against trying to pressure us to force windmills on a population that, as of now, does not want them. That has been the tactic of the wind companies for the last few years and it continues to have a zero chance of success. Replace lecturing with negotiation – the antis are well aware of the reasons to build these things and are not convinced. Perhaps you can pay their electric bills to win some support….

 

BigWind leaseholders in Michigan have regrets

How many of you think that all residents living INside industrial wind sites are happy? You need to listen to this Youtube video from residents & leaseholders in Michigan. Will this happen to our neighbors in Ohio? Remember, BigWind is now lobbying, in Ohio, to reduce our 1,250 foot setback and give the decision-making rights to our county commissioners….

Two Michigan residents share their experiences living inside utility scale wind plants. One is a long time supporter of wind energy and another is a man who has leased his ground to wind developers. Both now have profound regret….

https://youtu.be/ps6tJMSXKic

 

 

15 Problems that occur when BigWind enters your neighborhood

Be sure to read through all 15. As you just read in our prior post, BigWind is ready to attack Ohio, again. You need to know what comes with it and educate your neighbors and friends. It is also important to let your local, county and state legislators know how you feel!…

…New York State Attorney General, Eric Schneiderman, claims that President Obama’s so-called Clean Power Plan is making a difference here in New York State. It certainly is, but negatively so! Rural communities in New York …

1.) Wyoming County taxes have risen yearly over the past 12 years (concurrent with the proliferation of wind factories in the County) – up another 9.68% this year.

2.) Wind factories are NOT paying their fair share of taxes, but instead “shift the burden of taxation on to local residents and small businesses.”

3.) Real Estate 101: LOCATION! LOCATION! LOCATION! Property values are significantly negatively-impacted. Many homes are selling below assessed value, if they sell at all. [Three more properties in the area of the Wyoming County wind factories went to auction this week (11/7/15).]

4.) The Town of Eagle, which has a wind project, was reassessed to what they were told was 100% just last year (2014), and had their assessments jacked up another 40% again this year (2015).

5.) Few – if any, meaningful permanent jobs were created here (maybe a few dead bird/bat picker-uppers). Western and Upstate New York continue to hemorrhage jobs as high taxes and electric rates continue to drive business, industry and people out of the state.

6.) The population of Wyoming County has decreased by another 2.2% since 2010 as people continue to flee the area.

7.) Nobody is getting “free” or reduced rate electricity here. In fact, New York State electricity rates continue to “skyrocket” as $Billions more of our taxpayer and ratepayer dollars are thrown into the wind.

According to NYSERDA, the average NYS residential electricity rate in 1999 was 13.3 cents per kilowatt hour (kWh). The first wind factories went up in New York State in 2000 (Wethersfield & Madison). 20 wind factories later, and the average residential electricity rate in NYS as of February, 2015, is now 19.8 cents per kWh (according to the EIA, as cited by NYSERDA) – one of the highest rates in the nation, and nearly a 50% increase since New York State began mindlessly plastering the NYS countryside with redundant generation of industrial wind factories.

The actual output of New York State wind factories has been averaging a pathetic 24% Capacity Factor – many days providing nothing at all.

Noteworthy: New York State was already getting nearly 50% of its electricity from emissions-free sources back in 2000 – 29% from nuclear, 19% from hydro, and about 1% from all other renewable sources. Fifteen years later, with countless $Billions of taxpayer and ratepayer dollars thrown into the wind, and the breakdown is now: 30% from nuclear, 23% from hydro, and approximately 3% from all other renewables (wood, biomass, wind, solar, geothermal, etc.). Natural gas is now providing the largest percentage of NYS electricity generation (approximately 40%), while coal is approximately 2% of electric generation in NY.

8.) The only thing that has been reliably generated by industrial wind is complete and utter civil discord. Community relations have been ruined. People who used to be friends no longer speak. Even families have been divided.

9.) Habitat Fragmentation associated with the miles and miles of industrial sprawl, access roads associated with wind factories, and added transmission lines that must be run from remote locations to New York City (where the power is needed), has forever destroyed “the sense of place” Wyoming County (and much of rural New York) was famous for, and is cited as one of the main reasons for species decline worldwide.

10.) Negative impacts from wind turbine-related ‘infrasound’ have been documented worldwide. In fact, New York State officials acknowledged they knew about the problems associated with ‘infrasound’ back in 2009. Yet, Governor Cuomo and Attorney General Schneiderman – the very NYS officials charged with protecting our health, safety and welfare, have neglected to require any health studies to assure the protection of New York State citizens, while continuing to allow ludicrous placement of these giant machines only hundreds of feet from peoples’ homes.

11.) Lawsuits persist.

12.) Radar systems are severely impacted, thus impacting Homeland Security. Since it wasn’t in Invenergy’s contract to cover it, Wyoming County residents are stuck paying an untold amount for a new Emergency Communications tower after the one we had no longer works adequately following the construction of Invenergy’s Orangeville wind factory in 2013 (Another county-wide impact, as the new tower sits unfinished).

13.) The “flicker”/strobe effect created when the sun is behind the turbines, and the blinking red lights at night drive some crazy. The light pollution now corrupting our night sky looks like a cheap blinking Christmas tree spread out for miles.

14.) Since the diffuse energy of wind cannot replace reliable, dispatchable, baseload generation sources, all of the environmental, economic and civil devastation has been for naught. Thus, consumers pay for the redundancy of wind, and for all the transmission lines that must be added to run across New York State to New York City (where the power is needed in New York State).

15.) It remains to be seen who will take these giant fans down once they are defunct. According to a prominent wind industry attorney, should the corporations abandon a project – whatever the reason, “The landowner will be liable.”

It’s long past time that we STOP the decimation of rural America for the destructive NON-SOLUTION of industrial wind energy.

Source: Wind Power Destruction in New York State: ‘Clean’ Power Plan Problem – Master Resource

906 Homes IN OHIO are less than a mile from a turbine…. | Welcome to Greenwich Neighbors United

This is Huron county, Ohio, where a developer has proposed another project for Ohio. Do you have friends/family that live there? Call them and ask them to get involved! Don’t think this couldn’t be YOU next….

Take a look, what we now call home, Greenwich, Ohio an historical rural farming community will become a Wind-Powered Electric Generation Facility unless “We the People” let our governor, state and federal representatives, the Ohio Power Siting Board [always include case no. 13-0990-EL-BGN when communicating with them] on down know of your displeasure! Get moving Greenwich, click on the menu buttons to the left, you will be taken to the page where you may email them. Oh, and by the way, our township trustees are still also very much a part of this, so don’t forget to become involved at both the township & county levels see schedule below!…

via 906 Homes are less than a mile from a turbine…. | Welcome to Greenwich Neighbors United.

Logan-Hardin Neighbors United turn up the heat on BigWind

Ohio meeting puts the heat on BigWind. Note the highlighted points by Tom Stacy, below…

For the approximately 75 people that braved the stormy weather, Monday night at the Friendly Senior Center was an opportunity to hear the Logan-Hardin Neighbor’s United’s strong case against using wind turbines as a supplemental energy source.

The organization was started in September of 2013 by residents in the Belle Center and Indian Lake area….

Shepherd thinks wind turbines will increase energy rates and infringe on property owners’ ability to enjoy where they live. He thinks that many will be built too close to where people live. He doesn’t like how many will be built around Indian Lake. Finally, tax dollars will be misused.

Shepherd is especially concerned with how close to homes the wind turbines can be built. They cause “shadow flicker”, are noisy, and aren’t failsafe.

Tom Stacy, an advocate for affordable energy, explained that wind turbine usage will actually increase energy bills for taxpayers. If wind turbines create energy, other energy creators must cut back their production. In order to cover their costs, they must submit a rate case to PUCO. By law, taxpayers must assist energy companies if they can not meet expenses.

Wind turbine companies, according to Stacy, can’t make any money without government assistance. Typically, turbines barely make enough to cover their production costs.

The supposed income that schools receive from turbines is misleading. If a district, for example, receives $200,000, the state will decrease that amount in foundation money to the district.  Hence, there isn’t any advantage to district’s that have the turbines….

 

via Logan-Hardin Neighbors United presents strong case opposing wind turbines Audio included | Peak of Ohio.