Logan-Hardin Neighbors United turn up the heat on BigWind

Ohio meeting puts the heat on BigWind. Note the highlighted points by Tom Stacy, below…

For the approximately 75 people that braved the stormy weather, Monday night at the Friendly Senior Center was an opportunity to hear the Logan-Hardin Neighbor’s United’s strong case against using wind turbines as a supplemental energy source.

The organization was started in September of 2013 by residents in the Belle Center and Indian Lake area….

Shepherd thinks wind turbines will increase energy rates and infringe on property owners’ ability to enjoy where they live. He thinks that many will be built too close to where people live. He doesn’t like how many will be built around Indian Lake. Finally, tax dollars will be misused.

Shepherd is especially concerned with how close to homes the wind turbines can be built. They cause “shadow flicker”, are noisy, and aren’t failsafe.

Tom Stacy, an advocate for affordable energy, explained that wind turbine usage will actually increase energy bills for taxpayers. If wind turbines create energy, other energy creators must cut back their production. In order to cover their costs, they must submit a rate case to PUCO. By law, taxpayers must assist energy companies if they can not meet expenses.

Wind turbine companies, according to Stacy, can’t make any money without government assistance. Typically, turbines barely make enough to cover their production costs.

The supposed income that schools receive from turbines is misleading. If a district, for example, receives $200,000, the state will decrease that amount in foundation money to the district.  Hence, there isn’t any advantage to district’s that have the turbines….

 

via Logan-Hardin Neighbors United presents strong case opposing wind turbines Audio included | Peak of Ohio.

Farmers’ coalition warning us about BigWind !!!

Please share with your neighbors and family members. The $ offered to farmers is very enticing….

The Informed Farmers Coalition IFC was formed five years ago to study the impacts of wind turbines on our agricultural and residential community. The group consists of past or present union iron workers, school teachers, township officials, lawyers, a farm manager, a plumber, a fireman, a mechanic, school board members, county board member, union truck drivers, a dentist, retail workers, construction workers, nurses, union equipment operators, hospital workers, a social worker, bookkeepers, a school administrator, salesmen, an electrical engineer for Com Ed, an EMT, numerous local business owners, large/small landowners, homeowners, and of course, farmers – many of whom are the third and fourth generation on that farm. Many are lifetime residents of this agricultural community.

They have discovered, through sworn testimony throughout the state, that people are suffering from the same health issues, noise disturbances, untruthful wind company promises, property value losses, etc. The ongoing research brings the discovery our local landowners may be responsible for the property taxes and decommissioning of the wind turbine should the wind company walk away from the project. The turbine property tax bill stays in the name of the landowner with the bill being listed c/o of the wind company. So ultimately if the wind company doesn’t pay, it will be sent to the landowner.

IFC became aware some of our local landowners with signed contracts had never seen a map where their turbines were projected to be placed. The map presented with the petition to the county also shows underground transmission lines. Some landowners were not aware transmission lines would go through their property and did not think they had signed up for that. One landowner agreed to a contract but for only 80 acres of his property. But when IFC was researching at the county, they discovered his contract was filed containing all 560 acres of his property.

The real experts about wind turbines are the citizens living among them. IFC has attended numerous county meetings across the state of Illinois only to realize the people testifying under oath all have the same story – homes where they can no longer live or sell due to noise and health issues; wind companies that townships must sue to collect their rightful money; trespassing of heavy equipment on non-participating land that compact the soil for years as well as damage crops and tile; crop dusting problems; GPS systems that no longer get a signal; cell phones and TV reception problems; etc.  IFC is aware that Lifeline helicopters may not choose to land in a turbine area; this was needed this spring for a local farm accident. A letter from a school superintendent states the children in his school district are suffering from the effects of the turbines, since they went online.

IFC also became aware that once a person signs a contract they have agreed to a gag order that restricts them from talking about the wind company…

via Guest Commentary | BCRNews.com.

Victory against BigWind in Kokomo, Indiana

Congratulations to our neighbors to the West! On June 10th, we blogged about their situation. Residents in Howard County were begging the neighboring town to incorporate their area, in order to avoid BigWind development. Property devaluations and noise disturbances have occurred in the operational wind site. People are beginning to wake up….

After months of contention surrounding further wind farm development, juwi Wind has decided to cut its losses and part ways with Tipton County….

The decision to halt the project came almost 11 months into a lawsuit filed by juwi against the Tipton Board of Zoning Appeals. The lawsuit alleged the BZA had exceeded its authority by increasing the distance wind turbines had to be from property lines and requiring a property value guarantee plan to protect non-participating property owners in the project area….

via Wind developer withdraws plans to build Prairie Breeze Wind Farm » Local News » Kokomo Tribune; Kokomo, Indiana.

Kalida, Ohio says NO to BigWind!

How refreshing to know that some Ohioans have common sense!! Congratulations for doing your homework and making an INformed decision!!

Two years after village residents voted 64 to 36 to zone for turbines, based upon approval by council, the village of Kalida said no to wind turbines. In a five-to-one vote during Monday’s regular meeting, members of Kalida Village Council voted down a request by KMI, Inc. to construct two wind turbines to offset the company’s electrical costs.

Former Kalida council member Dick Bockrath spoke on behalf of residents who were opposed to the wind turbine construction. He referred to a mapped diagram of the proposed turbine placement, estimating that approximately 30 homes are located within 1/2 mile radius from one turbine and another 10 from the other. He said that KMI has been a benefit to the community, but that the wind turbine project has met with substantial opposition.

“Shadow flicker, noise, ice throw, just the nuisance of having to look at these gigantic structures, but what it all boils down to is the potential loss of property values,” said Bockrath. “The village looks good. Why do we want to take a chance jeopardizing that?”

Bockrath referred to research he had conducted which resulted in governmental documents and public case studies in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Illinois. He noted that he was unable to locate a situation in Ohio which would mirror the KMI wind turbine proposal….

via Kalida rejects KMI wind turbines – Putnam Sentinel.

Will BigWind in Ohio be granted an 80% TAX REDUCTION??

Logan County Commissioners will be asked to grant something to wind energy developer EverPower that residents can only dream of: a property tax reduction of 80 percent. This would come in the form of a payment in lieu of taxes or PILOT.

Recently, the Logan County Commissioners stated: “Even if we do receive an application for payment in lieu of taxes and it is denied, the wind developer would still be able to build the wind turbines.”

We agree. Rejecting tax abatement for Scioto Ridge may not stop the wind development. But the decision to make local taxpayers forego tax revenue will have consequences that should be understood.

First: EverPower parent, Terra Firma Capital partners, a UK private equity investor, will be delighted to have their return on investment pumped up by the good people of rural Ohio. It will be the icing on the cake already funded by U.S. taxpayers through billions in federal tax credits that subsidize one third of the capital costs of wind projects.

After collecting from our Federal Treasury, the British private equity firm intends to strip mine the Ohio Tax Code by asking for an exemption from the Ohio Public Utility Personal Property Tax PUPPT. This is the standard tax rate that was in place long before EverPower decided to come to Ohio and it was there before EverPower started soliciting leases and telling landowners that by signing they would help bring significant tax revenue to their communities.

Ohio’s wind resource is anemic and the Ohio mandate to buy wind generated in the states is under attack in the legislature and the courts. This mandate compels Ohio rate payers to pay far more for Ohio wind than for power purchased from windier states like Iowa or Minnesota. These higher rates fall on all of us — you, me and the companies we work for. A sweet deal if there ever was one for EverPower. It is one more form of subsidy the wind industry enjoys in Ohio.

Logan County Our commissioners should focus on the costs. They must consider whether there are benefits that outweigh the costs. It is clear the benefits accrue to the foreign company that has stated its intentions to exit the business before the PILOT ends in 20 years. It is clear that leaseholders will receive payments if the company is still around. And some gravel might get sold during construction of the turbine bases.

But what about the costs? The wind developers took our ability to zone. They took our property for their setbacks by measuring from homes, not property lines. When built, flashing red lights will take our night sky and the flickering shadows will invade our yards and homes. Persistent noise and subsonic vibrations that carry across property lines — will diminish neighbors’ rights to peaceful enjoyment of their property. With that comes property value loss.

Who would choose to live in the midst of the 50-story tall industrial wind experience? As the London School of Economics recently concluded, residential property values of non-participating parcels in the footprint of a wind fueled electric generating plant drop by 11 percent. Other studies indicate a decline of as much as 40 percent. That’s if they can find a buyer at all.

There are more than 300 non-farm rural homesteads in the proposed footprint of the Scioto Ridge project. If their average value is $100,000 and the average property value decline is only 11 percent, that’s $3.3 million that flows out of the pockets of innocent neighbors and into the pockets of project beneficiaries. And the number might be as high as $12 million. By comparison the $12 million that is so important to the rural homeowners is a measly three percent of the total taxpayer subsidies the project owners would receive based on President Obama’s staffs analysis of a similar project. You would think a wind developer with scruples would just buy out all the homes and resell them at a loss since they are using taxpayer dollars — not their own — in the first place.

We know that proposed PILOT payments would be approximately $2.7 million per year for the expected 20-year lifespan of the project. That totals $54 million over 20 years. But without the PILOT, wind industry spokesman Dayna Baird Payne estimated tax revenue would be $45,000 per megawatt MW — an average $13.5 million per year and $279 million dollars over 20 years!…

via Both sides of the wind debate.