Illinois ‘over’pays for BigWind power, will Ohio?

 

Wise people learn from the mistakes of others, so they don’t repeat the mistakes, themselves. Will Ohio legislators learn from this lesson (and a multitude of other states and countries)? Let us hope so, for the sake of our businesses and residents…

For Springfield aldermen opposed to the 10-year-old Sierra Club deal that required the city to buy power from two wind farms, December 2018 can’t come fast enough.
By then, both contracts will have expired, at which point City Water, Light and Power estimates it will have spent up to $150 million. So far, the utility has spent about $101 million.
Ward 10 Ald. Ralph Hanauer, who wasn’t on the city council when the deals were approved, calls the wind-power contracts “the most costly mistake in the city of Springfield.” He added that the lack of a clause that allows the restructuring of the contacts to keep costs closer to market value — as just happened with CWLP’s coal contract — was part of the mistake….

The Sierra Club’s wind-power agreement… The 2016 price for both contracts for wind power is $58.97/MWh, according to figures provided by the city.
The variable cost of producing the same power from CWLP’s own generation has been about half that — less than $30/Mwh — over the course of the wind contracts. And the new price in the most recent coal contract makes CWLP’s variable cost of generation even lower — roughly $17 to $26/MWh, depending on the unit….

“Wise economics should determine whether future wind and solar investments are pursued,” McMenamin said. “Generally speaking, going forward, municipally owned electric utilities should concentrate on electricity distribution rather than generation.”…

“At the time, we didn’t realize how devastating it was going to be,” Redpath said.
While walking his ward and talking to the residents, Redpath said he’s run into a lot of people who are opposed to the wind-power contracts.
“There’s definitely a lesson for the future,” he said. “We have to be very, very careful when this contract comes back up. I don’t know how I could vote for it in most any form.”
Source: CWLP shells out $100M-plus for wind power

Feds must LIKE mosquitos and crop pests…

The hypocrisy is astounding. Other producers are fined $millions for taking endangered species, but BigWind is given a pass, EVERY time. And, the phrase “kill more than 60 endangered bats during the next 25 years” is laughable. We know these blades THROW birds/bats well beyond the radius that BigWind uses for their statistics. It is just a matter of time before Midwest crops are adversely affected by the massive bat kills and our use of pesticides is dramatically increased. How do Sierra Club members sleep at night? 

“The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is considering an industrial wind farm’s application to kill more than 60 endangered bats during the next 25 years.

Little Electricity, Many Kills

At the price of killing dozens of endangered bats, the proposed wind farm is not expected to produce much electricity. Operating at peak capacity during ideal wind conditions, the wind farm will produce about 5 to 10 percent as much power as a conventional coal or natural gas power plant. The wind farm is expected to operate at peak capacity less than a quarter of the time. Backup coal and natural gas power plants will have to continue operating even while the wind is blowing, in order to quickly ramp up and down to compensate for minute-by-minute and second-by-second wind variance. The ramping up and down of coal and natural gas backup power plants will reduce their efficiency and cause them to emit more pollution per megawatt of electricity generated than would be the case without the wind farm.

The wind farm seeks a permit to kill endangered Indiana bats and Virginia big-eared bats. Both species are endangered and experiencing rapid declines in numbers.”

via Feds Consider West Virginia Wind Farm Permit to Kill Endangered Bats | Heartlander Magazine.