Everpower’s ‘infrasound’ wreaks havoc on residents ONE MILE AWAY

With Everpower holding leases in Ohio (Hardin, Logan, Champaign county and beyond), you should share this with your family and friends.  An environmental health epidemiologist told these people that wind turbines should not have been permitted to be as CLOSE as 1 mile to their home! Encourage your fam/friends to get involved with a local educational group.  The groups are listed along the right-hand side of our blog. This Thanksgiving, give thanks to the Ohio House of Rep’s who passed HB 483 this year- it extended our setback to 1300 ft from the property line. Although it still appears to be woefully inadequate, it is a step in the right direction….

Low-frequency sounds can be detected in houses as far as a mile from wind turbines, an expert said.

Rick James, an acoustic engineer, said infrasounds are in homes located near the Twin Ridges Wind Farm.

Twin Ridges, located on the Big Savage Ridge area near the Maryland-Pennsylvania border, went into operation in late 2012.

James tested the infrasounds in a house that belongs to Tammy McKenzie and her husband Joe – who say they live in the “dark, deep depths of hell” beneath the shadow flicker, high- and low-frequency sounds that emit from the wind farm’s turbines.

“The tests at the McKenzies showed the characteristics I have found in homes of people who not only had adverse (health) reactions, but whose reactions were strong enough to make them decide to move if they find a home buyer or in some cases just vacate the home and move elsewhere,” said James.

In other areas, such as the Shirley Wind utility in Brown County, Wis., where more extensive testing has been conducted, folks reported adverse health effects including the sensation of moving while being still and pressure in the head, James said.

“Other people in the house may not sense anything,” James said. “There is a broad range of sensitivity to this acoustic energy. That is really not unexpected.”

Joe McKenzie said the sound of the wind turbines causes ringing in his ears and pressure in his head, his wife said….

Before the project’s construction in 2011, EverPower — a Pittsburgh-based company that owns Twin Ridges —  worked with municipalities to develop agreements and ensure compliance with industry standards, said Michael Speerschneider, chief permitting and public policy officer.

The frequency range of the infrasounds differ from waves such as sound emitted from other types of rotating machines, James said.

“Instead, they have large spikes of (peaks or crests) that are as much as 100 to 1,000 times higher in pressure than the pressure in the valleys between the spikes,” said James. “While the average sound pressure level of the tones may not appear to be very significant, it is the peaks of the pressure waves that are significant.”

Despite the sounds, the McKenzies say they refuse to vacate their “dream” home.

Tammy McKenzie also said she talked to Farhad Ahmed, an environmental health epidemiologist from Harrisburg.

“He states that they should not have let the wind industry place a turbine close to our house in the first place due to health concerns of the noise that is emitted from the turbines,” Tammy McKenzie said….

Infrasound found in homes near wind farm – News – The Cumberland Times-News.

Will Everpower ignore resident complaints in Ohio, too?

Recently, the Cumberland, MD newspaper reported a story of the effect an Everpower project, known as Twin Ridges, is having on residents of a PA community near the Maryland state line.  Noise, a constant hum, headaches and shadow flicker from 68 turbines built by Everpower are described.  Residents report that they receive no resolution of the complaints they file with the company.  What is perhaps one of the most surprising points made in this story by Everpower’s representative, Michael Speerscheider, is that when they measure noise levels, they “filter out” the “background noise”.  Siting procedures and rules for noise differ from state to state and community to community but it would have seemed to us that a “normal” background noise level would have been agreed upon prior to building the facility and that current noise levels would assume that anything over the preconstruction background noise would be due to the wind turbines.  To have Everpower claim that by using their own equipment, they are within noise limits seems odd to us.

UNU has consistently expressed concern about complaint resolution procedures which even today have not been proposed by Everpower for the Buckeye project.  To read that after 20 complaints have been made by one family, the problem continues at such a level as to motivate the family to post a huge sign by their driveway saying “This is God’s Country – Why am I living in the dark, deep, depths of Hell?” is certainly troubling. 

A comment filed by another resident following the newspaper story speaks to the finances of the Twin Ridges project.  “Time for accountability and transparency….Twin Ridge is project name, but it is Big Savage, LLC is a subsidiary of Everpower. They received $65,408,684.00  on Jan. 24, 2013 from the US Treasury. In addition, it also received state subsidies: “Matthew Karnell, director of the Commonwealth Financing Authority’s programs division for the Department of Community and Economic Development, said the agency awarded Twin Ridges $12.7 million grant that was essential to construction  So, total federal and state subsidies equaled:  $78,108,684 .    Good grief….

Tammy and Joe McKenzie believe they live in the “dark, deep depths of hell” beneath the shadow flicker, high- and low-frequency sounds emitting from wind turbines that are part of the EverPower Twin Ridges Wind Farm.

The wind farm is located on the Big Savage Ridge area near the Maryland-Pennsylvania border.

Some of the 68 wind turbines that are part of the farm can be seen from Cumberland when looking through the Narrows and from Frostburg and Mount Savage.

The project went into operation in late 2012.

“It causes a lot of problems because I’m not leaving here,” said Tammy McKenzie, who was visibly upset during a recent interview at her home. “This is our dream home and we should not have to give it up … We have lost the enjoyment of our home and our property  — something we have worked our entire life on.”

The sound of the wind turbines causes Joe McKenzie to feel pressure in his head and he can sense whether the turbines are turned on without looking due to ringing in his ears, Tammy McKenzie said.

The McKenzies say they measured decibel readings as high as 87 but were told those results aren’t accurate because they didn’t use a professional meter.

The companys engineer who conducts the noise abatement analysis uses a meter that filters out background noises and measures just the sound of the wind turbines, said Michael Speerschneider, chief permitting and public policy officer with EverPower….

via Residents say wind turbines cause heartache – The Cumberland Times-News: News.