Ohio letter shows what is wrong w BigWind

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Have you educated yourselves about these truths? Please do and share with others. As you read in our last post, BigWind, the pollster allies and lobbying groups are quick to persuade our legislators a ‘different story’.  Have you shared these truths with anyone today?? How about your legislators??…..

…When Baldosser states that wind turbines’ “efficiency is that they are quickly able to go on and off line” and if we need extra power it is easy to “put more turbines online,” it leaves the impression that wind turbines are turned on and off with a switch and that the wind is always there to use at a moment’s notice. This is just not the case.

In real life, the variable wind only blows enough for the turbines to generate one third of the electricity they could if they ran full power all the time. And, as every reader knows, the wind blows when it wants to, not when you want it to….

The intermittent output of turbines is one of their big downfalls. Some people like to say that it’s not a problem because they are connected to the grid and some other generating source will fill in the gaps. Currently, the only reliable source of power that is always ready to ramp up at a moment’s notice is certain kinds of natural gas generators. In the end, they will generate the two-thirds of the electricity that the turbines were suppose to provide but can’t because of variable winds.… And, because of the physics involved in using gas as a backup, the inefficiencies cause as much or more gas to be used in backing up wind turbines as would be used in more efficient full-time gas generators making all the electricity and not building any turbines in the first place. That is why wind turbines do not save on CO2 emissions. And remember, whenever you read that “wind energy is now the cheapest form of electricity” the cost of backing it up when the wind slows is not included in that price. Intermittent electricity has little value to you as the end user.

But what about batteries, you say? Baldosser’s 55-gallon drums sound like batteries! … While there are a few installed in California and Australia, they are only capable of storing a few seconds’ or minutes’ worth of power, and they do so at a very high cost. While there are many storage ideas being researched, there is nothing even close to being developed or deployed that can store the massive amount of electricity needed at an affordable price….If we were to ramp up current battery technology to the required scale, besides being extremely expensive, it would involve many environmental impacts and require moving mountains of earth on a scale even greater than mining coal to acquire the necessary natural elements like lithium, etc.

In the end, there is no perfect way to generate electricity without causing some issue. If we think CO2 is the immediate biggest problem, then we should be installing more nuclear plants, as they are the only thing that can generate massive amounts of stable electricity with no CO2. ...Eventually, they will realize that large number of voters being forced to live near wind turbines will not be happy with their current politicians. At that point, the wind fad will be over, but we will be left to live among the huge flailing armed machines for decades into the future, while things like solar panels would have had very few effects on surrounding residents….

Some will make lots of money on wind power and they will be happy. They are the ones so busy promoting it now. Every fad in history was pushed to its maximum by those making money on it.

Jim Feasel,

Tiffin

Letter to the Editor

Will (Ohio) property values be ‘Gone w the Wind’?

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As BigWind pushes Northern Ohio, one resident sees through the smoke and mirrors…

The Big Wind industry will use studies and carefully massaged statistics to send a message to communities hosting “wind farms that there is no real loss of property value. Well, as wind leases continue to be signed throughout Seneca, Sandusky, Huron and Erie counties, let’s take a closer look before we get blown away.

Important to note that all the studies in this article were based on industrial wind turbines that were a maximum of 477 feet tall. Industrial wind turbines proposed for the Seneca, Sandusky, Huron and Erie counties will reach heights of up to 652 feet and possibly much higher than that in future phases of the projects.

The setbacks (how far a turbine can be from a property) were, in some studies, much further than the 1,125-foot setback now required by Ohio law.

Current Ohio setbacks (1,125 feet) are the lowest in the four-state region and significantly lower than other European countries from non-participating properties. Most states and countries require a distance of 3 times the turbine length for safety reasons.

Turbine blade throws are not uncommon. The turbines in Paulding County (290 feet) have had a blade failure. The 7-year-old turbines in Van Wert (467 feet) had a blade throw this past summer that traveled over 800 feet in conditions that did not include high winds. This past spring, a turbine blade was thrown in Hardin County Hog Creek Wind LLC (367 feet). These are just Ohio blade throws.

There are 4-5 homes within a mile of the Hog Creek Wind LLC based on filings at the Ohio Power Siting Board.

Based on reports filed at the Ohio Power Siting Board, there would be about 800 homes within a half mile of the turbines in the proposed Republic Wind LLC and a similar amount within the proposed Seneca Wind LLC.

Home values decline anywhere from 8 percent to 65 percent within a 2-mile radius of the turbines in a “wind farm.”

The median home value in Seneca County is $108,381; in Huron County, it is $129,856; in Erie County, it is $125,400; and in Sandusky County, it is $123,145.

If we take the lowest median home value of $108,381 (could this be why Big Wind decided to pick on Seneca County first) and factor a modest 25-percent loss, that would be $27,095 per home….

The conservative estimated loss of property value within the Bellevue area alone could exceed $27 million!

Conclusion: The above estimate doesn’t take into consideration the increased insurance costs, burdened by leaseholders related to liability in the “wind farm” operation or further damage to home values in Good Neighbor Agreement-Wind Leases. Your county commissioners absolutely have the power to limit or stop these wind projects… Today, the counties of Hardin and Van Wert have rescinded their AEZ contracts and have repelled further wind project proposals for the good of all their residents.

resident of Bellevue

Letter to the Editor link