What do we do with Toxic BigWind trash??

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More than 10,000 of the existing 28,000 turbines need to be decommissioned!! Can you imagine multiple industrial wind energy sites like this? When each one consumes tens of thousands of acres? What are we doing to our landscape, our neighbors, our countryside. Oh, but wait, we forgot, BigWind claims THEY will decommission and take care of their machines- HAHAHA.  And, how, my goodness, HOW is this environmentally friendly? It’s NOT! It’s time to change the discussion and highlight the truth about these industrial sites. There is nothing green about industrial wind energy turbines….except the green $$$ the taxpayer gives to them…

Germany has more than 28,000 wind turbines — but many are old and by 2023 more than a third must be decommissioned. Disposing of them is a huge environmental problem. Expert Jan Tessmer tells DW he’s optimistic.

DW: Dr Tessmer, disposing of wind turbines is extremely difficult.  Their concrete bases go as deep as 30 meters into the ground, and are hard to fully remove, while the rotor blades contain glass and carbon fibers — they give off dust and toxic gases so burning them isn’t an option. Some environmentalists say this problem is being swept under the carpet, what do you think?…

Jan Tessmer: I actually think everything is relative. Of course it is an issue and of course you don’t get anything for free, but you always have to see it in relation, what are the values you get out of the wind turbine and I think yes, some efforts have to be made to efficiently, and also without environmental  damage, get turbines recycled or out of the ground.

There are huge concrete foundations that have to be gotten out but I don’t see there being any principal problem  that could not be overcome. It will probably be a challenge for technology. It will really be an issue over the next years and decades probably to get old turbines off the field, so I expect industry will find technologies to cope with it.

Is the difficulty in disposing of wind turbines hurting wind energy’s reputation as a green power source?

Yes, sure…DW eco@africa - wind turbines in Germany (picture-alliance/dpa/P. Pleul)

Wind turbines pose a big environmental problem when it comes to disposing of them…

Do you think that environmentalists are still mostly pro wind energy or do you think there’s been a pushback regarding the difficulties in disposing of wind turbines?

I think we have more and more problems with the issue of acceptance. I wouldn’t say it’s because of the disposal issue, I think it’s more on issues like noise or the lightning effects during the night, that people feel disturbed. I don’t think people think so much about the disposal issue, although it might be important and I also think that we have to address this issue.

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Why should we care about Ohio BigWind setbacks?

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Because a piece of turbine that is thrown more than 2400 feet WILL KILL SOMEONE WITHIN a setback that is currently proposed by BigWind in Ohio….Do we care about the lives of Ohio citizens or do we care more the pocket change BigWind throws at our schools?

Germany–At 8:15 pm on March 8, 2018, two rotors of a brand-new ENERCON E-115 wind turbine were completely torn apart – parts flew more than 800m away. This is the third heavy windmill incident in the circle Paderborn within 2 years. In Altenbeken a pinwheel pulpit was broken off, in Dörenhagen a whole rotor, which was thrown through the air and then stuck in the field like a sword not far from the main road….

 

Turbine THROWS pieces >800meters

Ohio BigWind is on a leash-for now

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Yesterday, the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee met but announced there would be no vote taken on H.B. 114 to reduce wind turbine setbacks.   Wind power to the people!   Chairman Balderson announced in the Committee that they had received new information and language which they needed to seriously consider.  They will take the next several weeks to study the issues raised and it is likely they will come back in July to see if the bill can be voted out of Committee and go to the floor of the Senate.

Rep. Reineke also responded to the good work of his Seneca County constituents and issued a statement in support of keeping the law as it is, unchanged at 1,125’ from the property line.  Rep. Reineke’s statement is copied below.  You will note that he does not support putting the property rights of citizens up to a vote…please THANK HIM!

Sen. Dolan and wind lobbyist Terrence O’Donnell were huddling after the hearing, planning their next steps.  Know that a new wave will be coming our way!!

 

 

A statement from Rep. Reineke from Seneca County.

Bill Reineke — Ohio State Representative for District 88 — at Ohio Statehouse.

Over the past several months, I have taken time to conduct due diligence in understanding both sides of the wind setback debate and specifically how the 88th House District feels on the topic. From the beginning, it has been my sincere hope that a fair compromise could be reached between those in support of wind energy development and those with concerns. I have taken the time to listen, engage, and evaluate how my constituents view reducing the wind turbine setback requirements.

Based on my continued engagement with the constituents I was elected to represent, I have come to the conclusion that no changes should be made to Ohio’s current wind turbine setbacks. Under current law, the setbacks can be reduced if “good neighbor” waivers are reached with affected landowners in the project footprint. Property rights are key and landowners on both sides of this issue have valid arguments. In pursuit of a compromise, it is unfair for one set of landowners to completely win this debate, and property rights should never be subject to a vote.

Current law provides sufficient protection for the health, safety, and welfare of the district but also allows for the free market to work. If a wind developer and an affected neighboring landowner can come to an agreement, which results in a waiver being signed, then that is all that should be required.

I have appreciated the immense outreach and engagement from all of my constituents, both those who are for and those against reductions in the wind turbine setback requirements. This has been a contentious issue that I have personally wrestled with during these past several months, as valid arguments have been presented by both sides.

It is my sincere hope that our community can maintain a sense of civility in our discourse with each other. This issue has been divisive and pitted neighbors against each other. While it is alright to disagree, we must remember to be respectful of others’ opinions when engaging in public discourse.

As your State Representative, I will continue to monitor and advocate for the district on this important issue. If you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please do not hesitate to reach out to my office at 614-466-1374 or email me at Rep88@ohiohouse.gov.

 

Ohio testifies against (HB 114) BigWind in a BigWay

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Yesterday was a huuuuggge day at the Statehouse where rural landowners from
Champaign, Van Wert, Seneca, Huron, Richland, Allen, Hardin and Logan
Counties assembled to provide opponent testimony against the proposed
setbacks in Sub. H.B.  114.   Fifty-three separate testimonies were
submitted for the record and twenty of them were presented verbally by a
great group of people including a Van Wert County Commissioner. All
testimony can be downloaded or viewed on the Senate Energy and Natural
Resources Committee website at
http://www.ohiosenate.gov/committees/energy-and-natural-resources/document-a
rchive .   The room was packed and those who made the long trip to Columbus
left quite an impression on anyone who saw us fill the main floor and the
balcony. We spent 3 1/2 hours stating our concerns and Chairman Balderson was kind enough to let everyone say what they came to say without time constraints.

We rebutted the notion that Ohio’s setbacks were the most restrictive in
the nation by showing that the universe of states to which we can be
compared is just four states.  If H.B. 114 is passed with 1.2x turbine
height setbacks, Ohio will have the third least protective setbacks in the
nation with South Dakota (46th in population rank) and Wisconsin being worse
than Ohio.  Wisconsin measures 1.1x turbine height to the property line and
1,125′ to the residence.  The Wisconsin Town Association adopted a
Resolution a few years ago calling for a Moratorium on further wind
development and the Brown County Board of Health deemed them to be a human
health hazard.

We presented a powerful testimony documenting the property losses
experienced inside the Blue Creek Wind project.   We uniformly presented
opposition to measurement from anything but the property line and opposition
to any reduction in current setbacks.  We all demanded that people inside a
project footprint have a vote in whether or not a project should be
approved.  One opponent actually lives inside Blue Creek.  She described
the awful nuisance effects and said there were times she had to leave the
area.

Senator Dolan was ready with questions we suspect were prepared for him by
the wind lobby.  He was essentially the only one speaking on behalf of wind.

*       Sen. Dolan said OPSB siting was unique in the US and makes Ohio’s
wind siting the most professional, responsive and protective in the nation.
He said no other state has what we have. But OPSB’s siting decisions
routinely wind up in the Ohio Supreme Court because they are flawed. Both
county and township governments have been intervenors and their concerns,
like the citizens,  have been disregarded.  OPSB has not adopted all the
siting rules they were required by law to adopt; they have no standard for
Low Frequency Noise; they do not enforce the law requiring property line
setbacks for amended certificates; they deny requests for safety manuals and
on and on.   One Supreme Court  Justice once opined that   “Where there is
no rule, there can be no violation, and there will be no need for an
amendment.”  That seems to us like the OPSB philosophy.

*       One point in our testimony that should be reinforced is that, in
almost every other state, the setback is established via local zoning
ordinance.  In 27 states, there are numerous issues that state Public
Utility or Public Service Commissions evaluate when processing an
application for a wind project certificate but setbacks are not one of them.
(In some instances, the developer can appeal to the state Public Utilities
Commission if they object to the local zoning.)  When other state
governments issue a certificate, they simply verify the application complies
with the local setback and that  a local zoning permit has been issued. That
is what the National Conference of State Legislatures’ survey reveals.
Moreover, it reveals that almost every local zoning ordinance measures
setbacks from the property line irrespective of differences in distance.
Even AWEA’s setback  chart confirms this.

*       Sen. Dolan continues to assert that granting PILOT constitutes local
control even after testimony that EverPower’s representative told the family
of a witness they intended to build without PILOT. Dolan
attacked the witness saying she was spreading “hearsay” that was not
credible.  Dolan tried to get Julie to agree that there was no longer a
project in Champaign County because EverPower had been denied PILOT.  She
said she did not know that to be true.    Another thing to consider is that
an increasing number of developers are building the wind facilities and
selling them – to corporations; to other wind companies and to utilities.
These developers will not have to pay the tax because they won’t own the
project anymore.  Any company with a deep pocket and desire to appear green
(think Amazon or AEP) can afford to pay.

*       Sen. Dolan continues to assert the “two-pronged” setback – from the
property line and the residence addresses our concerns.  This is absolutely
laughable but it continues to have some kind of traction with legislators.
The only thing that matters is the distance from the property line. Anything
beyond that is irrelevant. The nuisance effects cross the line onto the
property on which these people pay taxes.  Although we continue to  say it
is trespass zoning and that the participating property-owner is given an
easement and compensated while the non-participating property owner carries
the burden, risks loss of property value and becomes a prisoner inside his
own house.

*       Sen. Dolan asked a witness if she would be willing to have the County Commissioners make the decision on approving a wind farm.
She said “no”.  She said some Commissioners are leaseholders.  (They also
have a conflict of interest in accepting the discretionary money which is
part of the PILOT and which can fund their own salary increases.) She
asserted the only acceptable thing would  be a vote of the affected people
inside the footprint.  It came through pretty clearly that local voters need
a voice.  A Van Wert County Commissioner stated that, even if the
people in the affected area do not have an opportunity to vote, the
Commissioners would take a straw poll anyway and that would guide them.
He also made the important point that giving local control to the
voters forces the wind companies to negotiate.  Right now they have no
incentive to negotiate and they ignore the concerns of the local community.
Related to that, he said in Paulding County the wind developer provided
a $5,000 bond to dismantle the Timber Road project.  That exposes the county
to a future liability that they probably will never be able to afford to
address.

*       Sen. Dolan asked us to acknowledge that the 2,300′ property line
setbacks adopted in Rush County, Indiana meant that a wind project could not
be built.  We said that was the choice of that community.  Further noted, Allen County, where Fort Wayne is located, voted to ban wind turbines. Noted, too, was the manager of the Blue Creek Wind Farm chose to live in Fort Wayne where he and his family would not be exposed to wind turbines. One size does not fit all.  Why
should it matter that a wind project would need to go elsewhere where they
can be accommodated?   It should be obvious to everyone that it is wrong to
facilitate a hostile takeover of a community.

*       We understand part of the reluctance to permit local zoning comes
from the Farm Bureau who thinks regulation in a rural area is the camel’s
nose under the tent and will legitimize future rural regulation such as for
hog farms.  That issue was squarely addressed in the testimony of our witness
 who said anyone who chooses to live in the country accepts that there might be pests and unpleasant odors from animal farm operations. But NO ONE expects to live inside an industrial power plant.  The farm lobby should not get away with conflating hog farms and industrial wind despite their continuing to call them “farms”.

If HB 114 were to pass in its present form, Ohio would become the dumping
ground for developers who want to site turbines ‘on the cheap’ near
transmission, rather than in more remote locations that have higher
transmission costs but fewer people.

As all of the debate continues, we are seeing more courts upholding
challenges from people who anticipate problems with proposed wind
developments.  There is recent court-related activity from Indiana, West
Virginia, Minnesota, Kansas and New York.

As noted above, Ohio does not have a standard for low frequency noise which
is below the threshold of hearing but can harm you.  We cannot see x-rays or
ultraviolet rays yet we understand exposure to them can harm us.  LFN is
harmful even though we cannot see it.  One opponent submitted written
testimony on this issue and we also recommend a good video to watch for a
better understanding of LFN at
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=194&v=ZXCZ3OyklrE .

Thank you to all who traveled and submitted testimony! veryone should feel proud to Every single person mattered —democracy in action!!

Seneca, Ohio commissioner Holly Stacy favors BigWind

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Commissioner Holly Stacy shows her ignorance by stating, “The previous board put the AEZ in place…That indicated that we are fair and open to energy development of all kinds.” BigWind reps are so smooth at selling their snake oil, they can literally sell sand to someone living in a desert. How? Because people simply aren’t familiar with this industry and the lies that often come with it.  Another BIG reality, that she misses, is that BigWind development will PROHIBIT other energy development in her area. Not only energy, but ALLL development in her area. Need proof? How many industries and businesses have relocated to Van Wert, Ohio since BigWind took over tens of thousands of acres? NONE.  People don’t want to live amongst these machines and new companies don’t want to build amongst them, either.  A decision to approve an AEZ benefits BigWind, but not the citizens of the communities within it.  An AEZ allows these companies to pay 1/6 of their tax bill and it gives away a communtity right to say NO. It gives all control BigWind. Wake up Ohioans…..

Opponents of wind turbine projects in Seneca County presented a petition with more than 1,100 signatures to the board of commissioners Tuesday morning and gained a notable new supporter in the process.

 

“I stand here with much support behind me, asking for your help,” he said.

Commissioner Mike Kerschner, who along with the other two commissioners has been supportive of the AEZ and the turbine projects, changed his position and said he believes the AEZ should be rescinded.

“The whole back and forth on the wind projects has been a bit of a cluster,” he said. “What this has caused is brother against brother, friend against friend, neighbor against neighbor.”

Kerschner said he knows the more than 1,100 people who signed the petition are against the project and he believes there likely are many more.

“I feel that somebody needs to represent your voice,” he said to about 60 people in attendance, of which the vast majority were there to ask commissioners to rescind the AEZ. “That somebody is going to be me from this point forward.”…

 

“It will still take a lot of work (to stop the projects),” Kerschner said. “We have to conduct conversations, not confrontations. Continue your campaign with accurate and insightful information.”

Kerschner moved that the AEZ be rescinded, but the motion died on the floor because Commissioner Holly Stacy declined to give a second and Commissioner Shayne Thomas was not at the meeting. Thomas said Monday he had a previous engagement before he knew the AEZ petition would be presented.

Stacy said she did not support repealing the AEZ Tuesday.

“The previous board put the AEZ in place,” she said. “That indicated that we are fair and open to energy development of all kinds.”…

Aichholz said if the AEZ is rescinded, it wouldn’t necessarily kill alternative energy projects.

“Every project the wind turbine companies propose would have to have its own negotiated deal in place with the county,” he said. “This will put the county in a much more advantageous spot when weighing the benefits and consequences from these projects.”…

 

Link to article

BigWind challenges Life Flight in Ohio

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The Apex turbines that have been proposed in Van Wert, Seneca and Sandusky counties will be approximately 600 feet high. How many lives could be lost or impacted if BigWind forces Life Flight to alter their flight paths???? Local residents deserve the right to vote on these projects!!

A potential 200 Megawatt Wind Farm with dozens or perhaps hundreds of turbines has been proposed for Eastern Seneca County and Southern Sandusky County.

But a group of concerned citizens want more say in where the wind turbines could go…

The Seneca Anti-Wind Union is a group of property owners who feel the economic needs of the county are outweighing the needs of these property owners.

“Money, money talks and so, when we’re talking about property rights, quality of life, that sort of thing; from a politician’s standpoint, that just doesn’t stack up to money,” said Greg Smith, member of the Seneca Anti-wind Union.

The group also has health and safety concerns, as Nate Blaser, fire chief for Bloom Township said the 600 foot tall Turbines would act as a wall that air ambulances would have to fly around on a day where there’s a low cloud base.

That’s because the proposed turbines in this project range from over 450 feet to just under 600 feet, far larger than other wind turbines in northwest Ohio.

“The ceiling height, or the window that they can fly into on a cloudy day is effected by the wind turbines. The wind turbines are much larger than what we’ve seen in other parts of the state,” said Bloom Township fire chief Nate Blaser.

The group wants to allow impacted residents to have a voice in the matter, which is why they oppose current Ohio House Bill 114, which would reduce the current turbine setback, allowing them to be built closer to private property.

“Right now, the local county has their hands tied, and the residents don’t have any say…

 

Link

It’s been a great week for BigWind in Ohio

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It has been a crazy week at the Statehouse.  The picture is becoming just a little clearer to us and it seems that the bill which Sen. Beagle drafted as Sub. HB 114 was NOT what had been expected.  Many were surprised that there was any setback language in the bill at all.  Equally surprising was the restoration of mandates even though the mandated amounts were reduced.  The House had worked hard to change the mandates to goals.  The Senate undid their good work.  All is up in the air.  

In the meantime, HB 604 was referred to the Public Utilities Committee for Sponsor testimony this coming Tuesday afternoon.  HB 604 changes the property line setbacks and it makes the PILOT program for tax abatement permanent.  It is not known whether there will actually be hearings on the bill after Rep. Strahorn (D-Dayton) gives his remarks next week.  One gossip sheet report we saw this week said:

“John Kasich, Ryan Smith, and their allies have fervently embraced well financed left coast, left wing organizations that are pushing solar and wind for Ohio.  At the same time, they are fervently opposed to both coal and nuclear power. As far as they are concerned every coal and nuclear plant in Ohio can close and consumers, investors, and taxpayers can be damned. Householder and his allies believe in more of an all of the above approach versus an either-or approach on energy issues.  They know that energy demand in Ohio and across the nation is increasing swiftly and we need coal, gas, hydro, nuclear, solar, and wind to meet the demand inexpensively.  They believe that Ohio remaining a low-cost energy producer is absolutely crucial to growing our economic base.” 

Tuesday morning, Conservatives for Clean Energy is holding a press conference at the Statehouse presumably to stage a theatrical act to convince Republican lawmakers to move swiftly on Sub. HB 114 or even SB 238 before summer recess.  An  article from earlier this year from the Washington Examiner lambasting the Conservatives for Clean Energy: “There is nothing ‘conservative’ about the Ohio Conservative Energy Forum, which appears to be little more than a front group for purveyors of wind and solar power, who will stop at nothing to keep their industry from having to stand on its own two feet. And that includes presenting themselves as conservative when, in fact, they are garden-variety hustlers looking for a handout.”

Apex has weighed in on Sub HB 114 saying, “The bill includes local engagement requirements, such as public meetings and letters to all adjacent landowners, and preserves ‘local control’ through county government consideration of property tax treatment for wind facilities,” Mr. Goodwin said. “We encourage the legislature and Governor Kasich to approve this measure before the summer recess to allow billions of dollars of investment from utility-scale wind development in Ohio to proceed.”   Ridiculous!  Every community facing the threat of wind knows that unwitting leaseholders are signed up long before the projects become public.  A requirement that public notice be given 60 days before filing with OPSB is laughable.  Public information meetings are also currently required and anyone who has ever been to one knows they are worthless and project maps on display show no roads or boundaries.  Finally, the notion that the County Commissioner’s authority to abate taxes has NOTHING to do with local input on setbacks or the ability of a community to determine if a project is a net benefit or a net harm.

Finally, we thought we would refresh your memories on what Senator Dolan said about his bill last winter when interviewed: “The setbacks were moved to a distance that really made it nearly impossible for wind farms to develop economically,” Dolan said”  Dolan may be telling the truth here.  Projects could be built if wind developers were willing to pay neighboring landowners enough money to sign a Good Neighbor Agreement.   Would it cost them a little more? Probably.  But taking it on an uncompensated basis by the action of the legislature would be more “economical”.  We guess that it really is just another handout to prop up the business.

In other news, just when BigWind convinces you that Ohio setbacks restrict their business

  • When Amazon, recently, announced a new facility in Madison County that will employ 1,500 people, Rep. Bill Seitz was quick to point out to his colleagues that “One of the most easily debunked arguments made by advocates of reduced wind turbine setbacks and for the retention of renewable mandates is that such is needed to attract companies like Amazon”.

 

  • Likewise, a solar company announced plans to open an office in Central Ohio despite no special mandates or handouts.  “A growing North Carolina business specializing in solar energy and roofing is planning a new office in Worthington.  Power Home Solar…as it looks to establish a market in Central Ohio. It says it ultimately looks to employ 65 to 70 in its local roofing operations. It’s looking to hire a mix of back-office staff, salespeople and installers. Founded in 2015 in Mooresville, North Carolina, the company has been listed on the Inc. 500’s list of fastest growing private companies.”

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