Ohio BigWind news is spinning fast

Screen Shot 2018-09-10 at 8.01.46 AM

Events are spinning fast in the world of wind.  In just one short week, much occurred in Ohio…

Seneca/Sandusky County

Apex requested the OPSB hearings on Seneca and Sandusky County’s Republic Wind be postponed while they “amend” their project.   Speculation as to the reason behind the delay and the amendment include uncertainty over the outcome of hearings on HB 114 and whether property line setbacks will be reduced.  Apex had anticipated the bill would be passed last spring, but setback changes remain unresolved.  That being the case, it is believed Apex does not have the necessary Good Neighbor Agreements to move forward with their original plan.  There is also talk of Apex moving the location of some turbines out of hostile townships to more welcoming townships. In the event the legislature gives township voters the right of referendum, would taking turbines out of the hostile townships ease Apex’s entry into Seneca County? 

We understand further that two of the Seneca County Commissioners sought legal representation concerning the Republic Wind Project including the existing Alternative Energy Zone designation.  Township trustees also sought legal counsel for the purpose of intervening in the case before the Ohio Power Siting Board.   The County Prosecutor’s Office believed they would be unable to simultaneously represent the opposing interests of the County and the Townships and so the County hired its own lawyer.  They hired Michael Settineri of the Vorys law firm who represents almost all of the wind developers in the state. WOW! 

Apparently, Commissioner Mike Kerschner, who has been sympathetic to people of Seneca County never had a chance to object or participate in discussion about this move.  Something is definitely rotten Seneca County.  Radio ads are also being broadcast in NW Ohio against Kerschner by the ‘Economic Prosperity Project’.  Readers may recall last March when this group sent out a mailer urging that “Republican legislators need to STAND UP to Bill Seitz” because “He is using his influence to prevent $4.2 billion from being invested in Ohio wind energy.”   The address associated with the Economic Prosperity Project was registered to Innovation Ohio, a liberal think tank run by former Speaker Budish’s Democrat chief of staff, Keary McCarthy, and former top Strickland administration policy chief Jeannetta King. The “Economic Prosperity Project” is a new corporation registered to a former Strickland administration operative, too.

While these political shenanigans are playing out in Seneca County, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Rich Cordray is making the rounds in support of wind.   Cordray visited One Energy in Findlay where he expressed his support for wind. Next week he will be joined on the campaign trail by former President Obama.   It is noted also that Cordray appears to be currying favor with farmers who oppose stricter controls on manure disposal in order to clean up Lake Erie.

Huron County

In Huron County, the Greenwich Windpark project has been sold to a company called Swift Current Energy.  A group of mostly Ivy League investment bankers looking to make a bunch of money.  A series of articles below tracks a bit of history surrounding Swift Current.  Readers may recall last year General Motors announced that it would purchase wind from two projects. One project was Northwest Ohio Wind in Paulding County and the other was HillTopper in Logan County, Illinois.   The HillTopper project was a controversial project in Illinois where the original developer agreed to make payments to nonparticipating landowners on an annual basis and to establish a property value insurance program that would be managed through the Logan County tax assessor’s office to compensate homeowners should they experience a loss in the value of their property after the wind farm becomes operational.  

The project never moved forward until recently when Swift Current purchased it and since late 2016 worked to redevelop the HillTopper project, including adding new project participants; redesigning and re-permitting the project; contracting the energy on a long-term basis; and raising financing for the construction and operations of the project. Enel Green Power is managing construction for the project and will be the long-term owner and operator of the wind farm.  The HillTopper project has not been without some local controversy.  We wonder if Swift Current will also seek to sell Greenwich energy output to GM.   It is interesting to see that they were not deterred in buying a troubled Illinois project and getting it up and running by re-engineering the whole project.

In Ohio’s 13th Senate District, Rep. Manning is seeking to swap his seat in the House with his mother who is term limited in the Senate.  This appears distasteful on its face.  Neither Rep. Manning nor his mother, Senator Manning, have seemed interested in or sympathetic to the wind setback concerns of their constituents in Huron and Lorain Counties.   We were interested to read about Rep. Manning’s opponent in the Senate race, Sharon Sweda.   Ms. Sweda has served as president of the Lorain County Association of Realtors, chairman of the board for the Cleveland Area Board of Realtors and district vice president for the Ohio Association of Realtors.  How would she respond to a question about the property value of a home where a neighboring 600’ wind turbine’s nuisance effects trespassed onto the homeowner’s property while also sitting within the strike zone for flying blade fragments?  Someone should ask her on the record! She has nothing to lose by siding with the folks in the Greenwich Windpark footprint.

Lake Erie – Icebreaker

LeedCo and their Enviro buddies are making waves in Lake Erie over the Icebreaker project.  Over the objections of many wildlife advocates who protested the placement of wind turbines in the middle of one of the world’s most important migratory flyways, the OPSB staff recommended approval of the project with conditions.  In response, the backers of the Lake Erie wind farm and environmental and trade groups have agreed to proposed stipulations for the project in an Agreement.  In addition to Icebreaker, parties signing onto the prospective plan include the Ohio Environmental Council, the Sierra Club, the Indiana/Kentucky/Ohio Regional Council of Carpenters and the Business Network for Offshore Wind.  Now, in an effort to get the OPSB to back off the recommended stipulations, LEEDCo. Vice President of Operations David Karpinski says the stipulations  “make the project un-financeable and therefore are fatal conditions.” 

Migratory Bird Treaty Act Litigation

We hope the OPSB stands its ground and we also hope that they are aware of what is happening in other states with respect to the protection of migratory birds.   The battle over the Migratory Bird Treaty Act has expanded again, with eight states including New York and California filing a new lawsuit challenging the Interior Department’s scaled-back interpretation of the law’s reach.  In the suit filed this week, the states’ attorneys general assert Interior’s action endangers birds and “harms the states’ sovereign, ecological, and economic interests in robust federal protections of migratory birds from industrial and other human activities,” among other problems. Illinois, Massachusetts, New Mexico, New Jersey, Maryland and Oregon also joined in the suit, filed in the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York.  The lawsuit, as part of an effort to demonstrate that the states have the requisite legal standing, further asserts that “scientific, recreational, and birdwatching opportunities and aesthetic benefits … directly or indirectly generate economic activity and tax revenue for the states.”  

 Maybe Ohio’s Attorney General, Mike DeWine, who is seeking to become our next Governor ought to join the other 8 states in protecting Ohio’s greatest natural resource.  How about it?  No doubt the AG’s staff are currently advising OPSB on how to address the pushback on the recommended stipulations which Icebreaker finds objectionable.  We think this is a BIG DEAL….

**and finally, if you are new to our site and haven’t heard, please read through our past few blogs. On August 26th, a Van Wert, Ohio turbine blade exploded. A 10 foot piece was launched at least 800 feet away….legislative decisions could impact YOU someday!**

 

Advertisements

Van Wert blade shear gets NO media attention? Help us change this!

Against the backdrop of an upcoming election and a diminishing legislative calendar, the wind lobby is working overtime to press its case for reduced setbacks.   President Trump is a broken record on fake news but what about “no news”?   A blade failure occurred at Avangrid’s Van Wert County Blue Creek project on August 26th.    The turbines in the project are 476’ and a 10-foot section was documented by the local people via use of a drone to have flown approximately 825’.    Neither a 1.1x turbine height from the property line nor a 1.2x distance as suggested in H.B. 114 would have protected the neighbors, children or livestock from the thrown fragment.   

 

In this recent case, it appears the “systems” designed to stop the turbine did not work.  The rotor continued to spin for at least ten minutes after the blade fragment was thrown.  Neighbors called 911.  The Avangrid representative arrived two hours after the failure.  As far as we know, there has been NO media report or statement from the Blue Creek operator. 

 

Likewise, in Texas where a blade failure caused an overspeed situation and possibility of fire, a family of five was evacuated from their home.   There has been almost no press coverage of this event which occurred on the same day as Blue Creek   Lack of access to timely, actual  failure reports is one more compelling reason for statutory protective setbacks measured from property lines.  As seen in the story below, the mechanical safeguards intended to prevent the Texas overspeed situation, did not work.  ….

Texas family forced to leave home

Ohio politics and BigWind appears to be in Cordray’s pocket

Screen Shot 2018-09-05 at 1.46.55 PM

Election season is underway and they don’t call it the “silly season” for no reason.  A friend shared with is the 2018 Election Guide from the Farm Bureau.  The Guide included some questions and answers posed to the candidates for Governor.  One question was:  “What eminent domain reforms would you be willing to work on to protect property owners?”   Richard Cordray’s response was:

I will fight for farmers to have their day in court, working to bring Ohio back in line with its neighbors and federal law. The setback requirements for wind turbines that were recently imposed under Ohio law are an example  of restrictions on the rights of property owners that restrict the full economic potential of our rural areas, such as in northwest Ohio.”

So, if we read this right, Cordray believes a landowner has some kind of right to endanger a neighbor and trespass with nuisance effects.  Moreover, it appears he thinks there is some kind of eminent domain right for a wind developer to put turbines wherever they feel like it.  Yikes!

 

Following this “theme” the left wing group, Conservation Ohio, announced a $50,000 digital ad buy to boost Mr. Cordray’s gubernatorial campaign. The ads, which will run on Facebook, are designed to highlight Mr. Cordray’s position on energy issues. “Rich Cordray will be a governor who will fight for our environment, and defend us against the Trump Administration’s toxic environmental agenda,” Director Aryeh Alex said in a statement.

 

In Seneca County where Rep. Reineke listened to his constituents and supported their pleas for protective setbacks measured from property lines, a clean energy-supported group called Checks and Balances has filed Freedom of Information requests at Reineke’s office to learn about who is influencing him.  At the same time, Seneca County Commissioner, Mike Kerschner, who supports rescinding the county’s Alternative Energy Zone designation, is also the subject of a FOIA request.

 

As the General Assembly heads back to work after the Labor Day holiday, there is speculation on how the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Chairmanship will be filled after Troy Balderson won election to the U.S. Congress.   Interestingly, Senate President Obhof indicated he might merge the Committee into either the Senate Public Utilities Committee or the Senate Agriculture Committee.  Obhof was quoted saying a decision was likely this week.  House Bill 114 that proposes to reduce wind turbine setbacks is currently pending in the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee.

 

Obhof remarked in a Statehouse news report that “I think it’ll be a relatively seamless transition regardless of who the chairman is or whether we decide to combine committees,” Sen. Obhof said. “If we do combine committees we’ll…divide (bills) up among committees that would have jurisdiction. Most of the members in the Senate serve on four or five or six committees so people are familiar with the issues that are pending.”

The Senate Public Utilities Committee is chaired by Sen. Beagle and the VC is Senator McColley.  Others on the Committee are Republican Sens. Burke, Eklund, Matt Huffman. Kris Jordan, La Rose, Tehar and Uecker.  Democrat Senators are  Williams, O’Brien and Sykes.   The Senate Ag Committee is chaired by Senator Hackett, and VC Hoagland, with Republican Sens. Beagle, Kunze, LaRose, McColley, Peterson and Uecker.   Democrat Senators are O’Brien, Skindell and Tavares….

Have you contacted your legislator to share your views about the setback debate??????

 

 

Van Wert, Ohio Turbine BREAKS and throws debris >800 feet!

 

This blade failure happened Saturday in Van Wert County, Ohio. Second failure here in Van Wert in less then 7 yrs of operation. Here are the significant FACTS about this failure:

This wasn’t a storm incident with high winds and still managed to throw debri over 800’.

The debri from this turbine was thrown past the setback distance that was in place at the time it was installed (7 years ago).

With the new proposed setback distances in Ohio here is how far these turbines will be from your property line.
475’ turbine as shown. 570’
600’ turbine new proposed. 720’

One thing that this failure DIDNT do was throw debris past the current standing setback law of 1000’ to a property line.

Doesn’t take too much common sense here to see that Ohio current setback laws were made to protect the community and if anything need to be lengthened.

Which local news media will get out from under the thumb of the wind industry and post this???

15 reasons to kick BigWind away from Lake Erie

Screen Shot 2018-08-28 at 6.08.02 PM

15 Reasons to Reject Wind Turbines in Lake Erie

 

·         Special financial treatment for the wind industry, along with Ohio’s mandate that renewable energy be included in utility companies energy mix, have artificially propped up LEEDCo. It has received $50 million in taxpayer subsidies.

o   “(We) get a tax credit if we build a lot of wind farms. That’s the only reasons to build them. They don’t make sense without the tax credit” – Warren Buffett

 

·         Contrary to LEEDCo’s statements, wind energy is high cost electricity because turbines spin only when the wind blows, roughly 35 percent of the time. Sixty-five percent of the time they are non-productive.

o   Hidden costs come from base load back-up fossil fuel systems that must remain on standby to fill the gaps. Base load systems are designed to run continually, not to be taken offline and restarted to fill in for intermittent wind energy making them more expensive to operate, too.

 

·         Environmentally, turbines destroy hundreds of thousands of bats and birds annually, including protected bald eagles and golden eagles. LEEDCo turbines in Lake Erie will violate the Endangered Species Act and the Migratory Bird Treaty Act.

o   A study of one northern California wind farm found it kills about 60 eagles and 2500 other raptors annually . . . The Tennessee Wildlife Federation reported that in just two months the Backbone Mountain wind farm sliced apart 2,000 bats . . . PacifiCorp Energy’s paid a $2.5 million fine for violating the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act by killing 38 golden eagles and 336 other protected birds at its wind farms. . Duke Energy paid a $1 million fine for killing 14 eagles and 149 other birds at its Wyoming wind farm, and more.

·         Wind turbines will spoil the pristine natural horizon of Lake Erie. Cape Wind, which planned to build turbines off Massachusetts, was cancelled after 14-years of planning due to broad public opposition, including lawsuits claiming the project would harm property values, tourism and fishing.

 

o   Lake Erie, once called a “dead lake”, is now a thriving fishery, source of drinking water, and home to countless waterfowl especially the comeback of bald Eagles along the shoreline. It is an internationally important migration route. The BSBO, American Bird Conservancy & National Audubon Society believe that by insisting that LEEDCO completes bird & bat studies through the right process and the right science, it will prove that turbines shouldn’t be built in Lake Erie.

 

·         Icebreaker is a serious environmental threat to Lake Erie and the drinking water it supplies. First, the turbines are certain to stir up and release toxins during their construction and thereafter.

 

o   For decades, multiple toxins, including PCBs, dioxin, mercury, cadmium, lead and arsenic were filtering into Lake Erie and now rest in the lake bottom sediment. Moreover, the Army Corps of Engineers dumped toxic sediment from the Cuyahoga River into Lake Erie for decades. There is an unacceptable risk of stirred up toxic sediments while installing LEEDCo turbines and 12-plus miles of cables. There is also legitimate concern over what else could be stirred up from Cleveland’s heavy industrial past when the lake bottom is disturbed.

 

·         Wind turbines contain 400-plus gallons of industrial lubricants in their gearboxes. Those lubricants need to be changed and gearbox seals fail sending oil into the lake below. Even worse, exploding and burning wind turbines are commonplace. When this occurs, burning turbines will create toxic emissions polluting the lake below.

 

o   Research shows about 120 wind turbines catch fire each year – ten times the number reported by the industry. Fires are a problem for the industry, impacting energy production, economic output and emitting toxins, casting a dark shadow over the industry’s “green” credentials. Wind turbines catch fire because highly flammable materials such as hydraulic oil and plastics are in close proximity to machinery and electrical wires. Winds will quickly fan the fire.

o   To see turbines explode, just go to YouTube and search: “wind turbine fires”

 

·         LEEDCo is set to sell the turbines to Fred. Olsen Renewables (a Norwegian multi-national). Olsen will then sell the electricity from Icebreaker to Cleveland Public Power, Cuyahoga County and others who have prematurely agreed to buy at a rate that’s certain to be much higher than other available sources.

 

o   The cost to construct and maintain an offshore turbine is 3 to 4 times higher than an onshore installation, and Ohio ratepayers will ultimately be stuck with the bills. Icebreaker is projected to cost a total of $126 million to construct, resulting in capacity of 20.7 MWh. For comparison, the “Steel Winds” onshore project near Buffalo cost about 75% less and generates more power capacity. Imagine changing out the lubricants or replacing a gear or blade in high waves or during the winter. They will produce no power until spring at the earliest.

 

 

·         LEEDCo admits Icebreaker is the “demonstrator” project leading to Olsen building as many as 1,400 to 1,600 more turbines in Lake Erie (and likely other Great Lakes) and that will threaten the Ohio’s tourism success and reduce property values.

 

o   A view of 479-foot spinning industrial blades runs contrary to the views many seek for their vacations. A study by North Carolina State University documented over 50 percent of vacationers would not rent a vacation home if wind turbines were in view. The other half would insist on a discounted rate to compensate for the lost view. Moreover, home buyers pay a premium for location and view. But property values have been shown to decrease where views are diminished by wind farms. That triggers a reduction in property tax revenues.

 

·         LEEDCo’s contention that there is widespread approval for Icebreaker is refuted by a Cleveland Plain Dealer study that showed 57.87 percent of those surveyed disapproved of Icebreaker, and many more had no opinion.

 

·         LEEDCo’s inference that some 400 public meetings it says it has held shows approval is simply unsupportable.  Holding a meeting does not confirm approval, and may, in fact, demonstrate the opposite. Evidence is clear the general public has not been made aware of the costs or dangers inherent on Icebreaker.

 

o   For example, LEEDCo’s recent meeting at Cleveland Yacht Club was one where the audience raised many of these questions and LEEDCo’s CEO Lorry Wagner couldn’t answer or rebut major questions.  As a result, the audience came out in clear opposition to Icebreaker/LEEDCO/Fred. Olsen’s project.

·         LEEDCo’s claim that Icebreaker will result in many good jobs is nothing more than fantasy.

o   The US’s first offshore project of five expensive turbines at off Block Island created a few hundred temporary construction jobs and only about six permanent ones – these at a cost of $290 million! In addition, Block Island cost about $150,000 per powered household, a monumental waste and a factual argument against offshore wind value.

 

.   Decommissioning and Disposal issues are additional threats to Lake Erie waters.

 

o   The useful life of a turbine is less than 20 years. They must then be decommissioned and removed. In California, for example, there are thousands of industrial wind turbines that have been abandoned and are falling apart. LEEDCo has no plan to address such an issue. Moreover, if the “demonstrator” project fails to exhibit its effectiveness as a reliable supplier of electricity (as is widely predicted), LEEDCo will be long gone leaving no plans to remove them. Indeed, many of the wind farms built in Europe 20 years ago will lose their government subsidies in 2020 and there are no funds or provisions to remove dead turbines.

 

.   There will be a need for “No Boating” security zones to protect the wind farms just like existing security zones around power plants and similar infrastucture. But these new bans on boating and fishing access will encompass dramatically larger wind farm areas, potentially eliminating hundreds of square miles for recreational boating and fishing.

 

o   In addition, Icebreaker’s power cables will be on the floor of the lake, crossing Cleveland’s main shipping channel. If more turbines are eventually built in the lake, freighters dropping their anchors may run the risk of striking the cable areas in the same way dragging anchors are known to hit underwater oil pipelines elsewhere.

.    A recommendation by the OPSB staff to eliminate overnight operations from March 1 to Jan. 1 unless it can prove to the Ohio Department of Natural Resources and the OPSB that Icebreaker’s the six turbines don’t kill migrating birds and bats is ludicrous.

o   The recommended 2-year radar study of migrating birds must be mandatory, not optional, and results required to be made public at least annually. While the accuracy of such a radar study is questionable given the size of small birds, etc., this and other science-based studies should be required. Up until now, extremely poor studies are being conducted, and the conclusions they reach are not based on sound science. For example, they’ve concluded there were no birds. But they were looking at a time when birds were not moving!

Conclusion:

The Ohio Power Siting Board’s mission is defined as supporting: “sound energy policies that provide for the installation of energy capacity and transmission infrastructure for the benefit of the Ohio citizens, promoting the state’s economic interests, and protecting the environment and land use.”

Going green is fine, but not appropriate in every circumstance or in every locale. In certain places, harnessing the wind just carries an unacceptable environmental risk and unjustifiable price tag. In the case of Icebreaker, the OPSB, ODNR and OEPA must meet their charge to protect the environment and Ohio’s most treasured natural resource, Lake Erie.

Rick Graham

Why battery storage won’t save BigWind

If BigWind is already UNaffordable, (see previous article),what will battery storage do to the economics? It spells d-i-s-a-s-t-e-r for the industry. We would join the ranks of Germany, where an article, “To Heat or Eat”, highlighted the disproportionate amount of cash that citizens pay for energy.  California legislators out of their minds, to believe that businesses will not continue to leave such an expensive environment….

A pair of 500-foot smokestacks rise from a natural-gas power plant on the harbor of Moss Landing, California, casting an industrial pall over the pretty seaside town.

If state regulators sign off, however, it could be the site of the world’s largest lithium-ion battery project by late 2020, helping to balance fluctuating wind and solar energy on the California grid.

The 300-megawatt facility is one of four giant lithium-ion storage projects that Pacific Gas and Electric, California’s largest utility, askedthe California Public Utilities Commission to approve in late June. Collectively, they would add enough storage capacity to the grid to supply about 2,700 homes for a month (or to store about .0009 percent of the electricity the state uses each year).

The California projects are among a growing number of efforts around the world, including Tesla’s 100-megawatt battery array in South Australia, to build ever larger lithium-ion storage systems as prices decline and renewable generation increases. They’re fueling growing optimism that these giant batteries will allow wind and solar power to displace a growing share of fossil-fuel plants.

But there’s a problem with this rosy scenario. These batteries are far too expensive and don’t last nearly long enough, limiting the role they can play on the grid, experts say. If we plan to rely on them for massive amounts of storage as more renewables come online—rather than turning to a broader mix of low-carbon sources like nuclear and natural gas with carbon capture technology—we could be headed down a dangerously unaffordable path.

Small doses

Today’s battery storage technology works best in a limited role, as a substitute for “peaking” power plants, according to a 2016 analysis by researchers at MIT and Argonne National Lab. These are smaller facilities, frequently fueled by natural gas today, that can afford to operate infrequently, firing up quickly when prices and demand are high.

Lithium-ion batteries could compete economically with these natural-gas peakers within the next five years, says Marco Ferrara, a cofounder of Form Energy, an MIT spinout developing grid storage batteries.

“The gas peaker business is pretty close to ending, and lithium-ion is a great replacement,” he says.

This peaker role is precisely the one that most of the new and forthcoming lithium-ion battery projects are designed to fill. Indeed, the California storage projects could eventually replace three natural-gas facilities in the region, two of which are peaker plants.

But much beyond this role, batteries run into real problems. The authors of the 2016 study found steeply diminishing returns when a lot of battery storage is added to the grid. They concluded that coupling battery storage with renewable plants is a “weak substitute” for large, flexible coal or natural-gas combined-cycle plants, the type that can be tapped at any time, run continuously, and vary output levels to meet shifting demand throughout the day.

Not only is lithium-ion technology too expensive for this role, but limited battery life means it’s not well suited to filling gaps during the days, weeks, and even months when wind and solar generation flags.

This problem is particularly acute in California, where both wind and solar fall off precipitously during the fall and winter months. Here’s what the seasonal pattern looks like:

If renewables provided 80 percent of California electricity – half wind, half solar – generation would fall precipitously beginning in the late summer.

CLEAN AIR TASK FORCE ANALYSIS OF CAISO DATA

This leads to a critical problem: when renewables reach high levels on the grid, you need far, far more wind and solar plants to crank out enough excess power during peak times to keep the grid operating through those long seasonal dips, says Jesse Jenkins, a coauthor of the study and an energy systems researcher. That, in turn, requires banks upon banks of batteries that can store it all away until it’s needed.

And that ends up being astronomically expensive….

“The system becomes completely dominated by the cost of storage,” says Steve Brick, a senior advisor for the Clean Air Task Force. “You build this enormous storage machine that you fill up by midyear and then just dissipate it. It’s a massive capital investment that gets utilized very little.”

These forces would dramatically increase electricity costs for consumers.

“You have to pause and ask yourself: ‘Is there any way the public would stand for that?’” Brick says….

Why batteries won’t work

Midwest BigWind energy IS TOO expensive for company to purchase

Screen Shot 2018-08-23 at 7.55.06 AM

You won’t hear about this in the mainstream media. We have blogged for years, that BigWind energy is TOO expensive to ever be a sustainable energy source.  Here is ‘quiet proof’.  Duke Energy has been an avid proponent of BigWind, but they have now ‘quietly abandoned’ plans to actually purchase it…..kuddos to Duke Energy for NOT passing these rate increases on to their ratepayers!!!…..

Duke Energy Carolinas has quietly abandoned plans for purchasing up to 500 megawatts worth of wind power capacity for the Carolinas by 2022 after finding the initial bids from producers “not economically attractive.”

Eleven months ago, Duke issued a request for proposals on wind power, expected to come from outside of North Carolina. It proposed offering power-purchase agreements of up to 20 years to buy wind power from projects, likely in the Midwest, that could be brought into the state.

“As we looked at the proposals, they were not economically attractive enough to go forward,” says Duke spokesman Randy Wheeless….

Duke Energy article